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Old 05-13-2013, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Cary
2,863 posts, read 4,674,752 times
Reputation: 3466

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The concrete slab by our front door has dropped about a half inch in one spot and no longer aligns with the brick steps. In addition the settling has created a low spot towards the house and the caulking at the junction of the pad to our house is getting green with mold. I can't envision using leveling cement since it would be very thin in other sections by the door since that area has not dropped. I'm getting a quote from Concrete Raising of North Carolina to inject material below the slab and lift it up with the appropriate grading away from the house. Does anyone have experiences with either the quality of the end product using this technique or the company that's quoting the work? I'm not necessarily looking for an inexpensive solution but rather a solution that looks professional since the affected area is at my front door. My neighbors had their slab broken apart, new fill added, and a new slab poured. I remember that approach as being rather costly. My slab is in good condition so the lifting seems to be a valid avenue to pursue. I'd appreciate input from anyone that has gone through this process.

Thanks, Chris
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Old 05-13-2013, 12:53 PM
 
Location: NC
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No experience, but watching this thread as we have some trouble spots in our circular driveway I'd love to fix.
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Old 05-13-2013, 01:03 PM
 
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When I had my patio extension done we tied in the old to new slab with rebar. This is very rarely done it seems and is what keeps the two separate slabs together and acting as a unit. I laugh because someone in my neighborhood had their driveway start to settle like you describe and ripped it out and repoured the half that was settling but now 1 year later it's doing the same thing...they didn't tie it in, and it would've only taken about 30 minutes to do so with a hammer drill.

I have no had experience with injection. I would talk to them about future settling and how their product would prevent it. Otherwise you are just doing a temp fix.
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Old 05-13-2013, 01:05 PM
 
Location: NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
When I had my patio extension done we tied in the old to new slab with rebar. This is very rarely done it seems and is what keeps the two separate slabs together and acting as a unit. I laugh because someone in my neighborhood had their driveway start to settle like you describe and ripped it out and repoured the half that was settling but now 1 year later it's doing the same thing...they didn't tie it in, and it would've only taken about 30 minutes to do so with a hammer drill.

I have no had experience with injection. I would talk to them about future settling and how their product would prevent it. Otherwise you are just doing a temp fix.
This happened to our front walkway nearest the house. The section right up against the front steps sank down and we had the builder come back and re-do it with re-bar tying it in to the house itself and also the other concrete. Still sits perfectly.
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Old 05-13-2013, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Morrisville, NC
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The injection definitely works and since they are putting solid material under the slab it will help even if the subsoil is not great. If you just rip out and pour new without dealing with the soils underneath it will most likely sink again. You will usuallly have some spots where they have to drill into the slab to put the injector. I think there may be some ways around this so call and ask. No idea about that specific company though.
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Old 05-13-2013, 02:35 PM
 
513 posts, read 1,604,687 times
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The only issue with mud jacking/pressure grouting is the unknowns of the soil underneath. You get no warranty against future movement. Sometimes its cheaper to remove a slab and replace it.

We have been grouting for 17 years or so and have had great success in recovering settlement. Garage slabs (if not cracked) and basement slabs are the best situations for this type of work. Its usually cheaper to replace sidewalks and patios.
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Old 05-13-2013, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Cary
2,863 posts, read 4,674,752 times
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This slab is approx 7' x 2'. The fill below, to the best of my knowledge, was stone, construction debris, and sand. I can see how it settled a bit. It's a small contained area so I hope we're good candidates.
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Old 05-13-2013, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Morrisville, NC
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Well of its known to be trash under there the best thing would definitely be to remove the old slab dig out all the bad fill below and place new properly compacted fill and re-pour a new slab.
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Old 05-13-2013, 08:59 PM
 
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A 7x2 slab @ 4" is <$40 in concrete
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Old 05-13-2013, 11:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
A 7x2 slab @ 4" is <$40 in concrete

I poured a 4' x 10' slab for an attached shed and it about killed me. My mistake was buying 80lb bags of concrete instead of 60lb bags. I used a cement mixer so the mixing part was easier, but I was sore for days.
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