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Old 12-15-2013, 11:09 AM
 
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Debating whether to just deal with painting the fiber cement on our house every so often or getting it "treated" with something like Rhino Shield. (Not sure what other options are out there but we saw the Rhino Shield info at a home show.)

Anyone ever do something like this? Recommendations and thoughts would be appreciated.
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Old 12-15-2013, 02:24 PM
 
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It will be interesting to hear if anyone has, but I wouldn't want to be a pioneer and be the first to try it. First, pre-primed fiber-cement holds paint really well, it doesn't need to be painted nearly as often as other siding materials, over a long stay in a house the cost of painting hardi as needed isn't very expensive. I don't know if Hardi's warranty on the siding would support non-standard paint coating, something to look into. Second, I've always heard that RhinoShield and similar were basically scams, overpriced paint. No type of paint is going to look brand new after ten years or so, and because fiber cement does not rot or warp, the only reason to repaint the siding is strictly cosmetic anyway, so I don't really see an advantage.
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Old 12-15-2013, 06:26 PM
 
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You are correct it is just an overpriced paint job. They don't manufacture it and only give a 1 year warranty on labor which is what any paint gives. Sherwin-Williams and every other manufacture gives a 25-year warranty just like Rhino Shield. It's only warranties for chipping, flaking, and peeling not fading so it's same as others. Save your money or get one with a warranty on labor for same term as material.
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Old 12-15-2013, 07:23 PM
 
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From what I understand (and keep in mind I've never had my hands on this particular product), RhinoShield and ilk are something like PlastiDip. If we took two pieces of wood, painted one with glossy exterior paint and judged durability, initially most would probably pick the PlastiDip board. Repeatedly dunk them in water then expose to hot sunlight for a while and the picture could change. The PlastiDip would probably resist water touching the wood better, if it was not scratched, but once damaged (think of a hole in a plastic bag) the water could get inside onto the wood with no way to drain. Plus I bet if you had a robotic arm doing the dunking for a couple of years, both of them would look like crap, especially if you simulated high PSI pressure washing, etc which would take its toll on the PlastiDip more than the paint in most cases.

I can see something like RhinoShield being beneficial for protecting something like crappy Masonite siding if it coated it completely, front and back and edges, before being installed because it could keep it from wicking water (of course as we all know Masonite didn't do anything like this and now a lot of people still have this horrible stuff rotting away on their home).

But now enter materials like fiber-cement or pvc. Who cares if they get wet? Cheaper and easier to just paint. And with Hardiplank you should be able to go 8-10 years or more without painting.
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Old 12-16-2013, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
37 posts, read 69,112 times
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agree with what has been shared above

in addition to paint, make sure you have someone seal the holes around the nails every 2 years, will go a LONG way toward keeping the masonite boards from being damaged by water
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Old 12-16-2013, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redwhiteblue1 View Post
agree with what has been shared above

in addition to paint, make sure you have someone seal the holes around the nails every 2 years, will go a LONG way toward keeping the masonite boards from being damaged by water
But, the OP is talking about fibercement, and there are no face nails in properly applied fibercement.
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Old 12-16-2013, 07:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redwhiteblue1 View Post
agree with what has been shared above

in addition to paint, make sure you have someone seal the holes around the nails every 2 years, will go a LONG way toward keeping the masonite boards from being damaged by water
One of the problems I've been noticing more and more with Masonite siding over the last couple of years is efforts to keep it going by painting the outside and replacing a board or two here and there. Problem is, usually by the time Masonite shows rippling on the visible surface, it's already been rotting from the inside out and has been holding water for some time, and the plywood underneath (or studs) have already taken a hit by that point. So efforts to keep the Masonite going by painting over the evils often just lead to more damage that goes unseen until the siding is pulled off.

There's a good reason they don't sell this stuff anymore
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Old 12-16-2013, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Northeast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
But, the OP is talking about fibercement, and there are no face nails in properly applied fibercement.
Right on about that..I haven't installed it recently, but the HP samples and houses I've scene recently look
fantastic and feel the extra cost in the product is well worth it.
HP has been a trusted name in the trades for a long time and can only imagine they have perfected their
product greatly over the past years..

Rhino Shield?? We use it in our trucks for a bed liner that's about it; as a coverage product...I'll stick with the
proven products thanks..
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