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Old 04-08-2014, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Containment Area for Relocated Yankees
1,052 posts, read 1,845,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eeyore1 View Post
Charters have a lottery when there are more applications than there are seats. It just baffles me that so many people apply to a school that only exists on paper.

There are some really great charter schools out there, but you need to do some research to find them. EMOs are bad, IMO, but others will disagree. When these companies are at the helm, those charters tend to be nothing more than "cookie cutter" schools. The mission statements are full of eduspeak and empty promises, like "project based learning, STEM, Arts, learning based outcomes," etc. Charter schools should have a compelling mission, and everything that comes out of the school should be guided by the mission. (A good example is Entrepreneur High School, where students learn a trade.) A charter school application that is full of buzzwords and gobbledygook scares me.

I encourage you to visit the NC Office of Charter Schools website, and read some of the charter school applications from the past year. Ask yourself if you see evidence that these schools will deliver what they say in their mission statements. (This goes for all of the applications, not just the ones run by EMOs.) You can see that some EMOs have submitted more than one application. These schools' applications are virtually identical, with just the name of the school changed where needed. The Boards of Directors tend to be made up of bankers, business owners, and real estate agents. I believe that educators, not fat wallets, should run a school. There is no evidence (IMO) that these schools know how to carry out their own mission. This is troubling to me.


A downside of not using an EMO is that school without EMOs will likely need to survive on less money. I would rather send my child to an outstanding school AND one where I knew exactly where the money was coming from.
First, I want to thank you for your response -- it's very helpful. I did look at their application a while ago, but honestly, not being an educator, after the first few pages of "eduspeak" it was all gobblegook to me.

It seems like the charters that have opened around here lately have all had a lottery for admissions. If there are only as many applications as there are seats, I guess everyone would get in (and essentially eliminate the need for a lottery). However, as you can see, there are plenty of parents to whom "a school that only exists on paper" is still more appealing than dealing with their local school district. It's a sad state of affairs, and speaks to the lack of funding, lack of class offerings (in non-magnet schools), lack of stability and lack of trust in the school board.
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Old 04-08-2014, 06:30 PM
 
4 posts, read 11,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gal83 View Post
Where did you get Waiting List info from? I though that they gave admission to everyone who applied.

No data and no information sessions is making the decision very difficult. Our base school is Alston Ridge which is currently capped. Returning to Alston Ridge if things don't go well at Cardinal would be hard.
Alston Ridge is a great school, if my base school were as good I would not entertain a charter school in its infancy. I did attend an information session back in February, but it would be good to have another session for parents of accepted students who need to make a decision. I hope everything works out!
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Old 04-09-2014, 08:31 AM
 
7 posts, read 19,034 times
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I would agree - a good public school is better than a soon to be established charter school. Unfortunately our base school is no good - so looking around.

Coming back to my original question, how realistic a chance I have with WL 22 in grade 5 (69 seats) and WL 55 in K (120 seats)?
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Old 04-09-2014, 12:47 PM
 
4 posts, read 11,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by traingleguyhere View Post
I would agree - a good public school is better than a soon to be established charter school. Unfortunately our base school is no good - so looking around.

Coming back to my original question, how realistic a chance I have with WL 22 in grade 5 (69 seats) and WL 55 in K (120 seats)?
I think there is a very good chance that your children can get in. As you can see, many people are undecided about sending their children to this school. There will be a lot of movement on the waiting list and number 22 can easily become a much lower number. It is still only the beginning of April and official offers have not even been sent out yet. Stay in touch with the enrollment specialist, she is really nice and I am sure she will let you know where you stand as the enrollment process moves along.
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Old 04-09-2014, 02:59 PM
 
7 posts, read 19,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RocStarMom View Post
I think there is a very good chance that your children can get in. As you can see, many people are undecided about sending their children to this school. There will be a lot of movement on the waiting list and number 22 can easily become a much lower number. It is still only the beginning of April and official offers have not even been sent out yet. Stay in touch with the enrollment specialist, she is really nice and I am sure she will let you know where you stand as the enrollment process moves along.
Thanks. Its a good forum we have here. Please do keep updated when you guys get offers and what you decide.
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Old 04-09-2014, 06:09 PM
 
621 posts, read 909,110 times
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This really speaks to the chasm between what parents in this area expect and what WCPSS delivers. The disappointment levels are so high that the barriers to filling up a charter school appear to be minimal.
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Old 04-11-2014, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
6 posts, read 15,118 times
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Our daughter got into K. I swear all I've been doing this week is research on charters and Charter Schools USA, specifically. Our daughter also got into a decent magnet, so deciding has been particularly difficult. We are leaning towards taking the leap of faith and going to Cardinal. We like the mandatory parent volunteer work, the uniforms, the new facility/technology, the parent portal where you can check assignments/grades. I also like that my daughter could stay in the same school through HS. It seems that the locations of the schools have a lot to do with the schools' ratings and test scores. The poor performing Charter Schools USA schools are predominantly in areas where the public schools are also poor performing. I'm hoping the Cary location may help - I've heard from a few friends who currently have kids in good Cary schools and are going to switch over to Cardinal. I'm still a little nervous about it - but every school has its pros and cons.
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Old 04-12-2014, 03:40 AM
 
621 posts, read 909,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynncy1 View Post
We are leaning towards taking the leap of faith and going to Cardinal.
Leap of faith, yes, but not that much of a risk. The lack of transportation is a barrier and facilitates various things:

- charter schools have committed parents
- charter schools have more willing students and/ or supervised-at-home children
- charter schools tend to have fewer students with disciplinary problems
- charter schools focus more on education than a BOE worried about elections, lawsuits, etc.
- charter schools don't have to deal with NC HEAT, Legal Aid NC, etc. intent on keeping disruptive elements in regular classrooms

All of the above, combined with other factors, produce charter schools with outstanding academic results and thus I can see the seductive appeal of charter schools. Throw in uniforms and you get the private school feel. Without the private school price tag!

While I don't believe a solid charter school student has a leg up over a solid public school student when it comes to admissions time, I too have considered charter schools in the past. And can't but help give it a thought every time I read about WCPSS' discipline standards being further eroded.
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Old 04-12-2014, 06:34 AM
 
75 posts, read 163,916 times
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Thanks for the information so far. We also got an email yesterday with enrollment details for our daughter who will be going to K. I agree that the hired principal has great experience. I don't see any information sessions scheduled yet on their website. Just saw the online video. I also tried looking up other schools managed by Charter Schools USA and found that some schools in FL are doing excellent whereas others are just average. As somebody said earlier, the location of the location of the school might be a factor.

They will have carpool signing booth in the Open house... Anybody in west cary (west of 55) considering Cardinal??
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Old 04-12-2014, 07:48 AM
 
Location: My House
34,827 posts, read 32,955,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pegotty View Post
This is one of the problems with large corporations like this one getting into the business of education. My husband just filled out an application for a job at the school. Once the application was completed he was asked several dozen personal questions about whether he had received food stamps, been on unemployment, was a veteran, had a disability, was an ethnic minority, etc., etc., etc. Hiring decisions at this school will not be made based on the most qualified candidates. They will be made based on which candidates will get the corporation the most government kickbacks. I can't even understand how it is legal to ask all those personal questions in a job application.
I thought they were not supposed to ask that entire set of questions of applicants. That set sounds like a combo of the ones they ask of applicants and new hires. Weird.
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