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Old 03-27-2008, 08:54 AM
 
144 posts, read 473,163 times
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Yup, it is growing fast. According to this it is not the biggest drawer of people but nevertheless, as with any other city in south & west, it is growing fast.

Census: Texas is the hot place to live - Yahoo! News (broken link)
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Old 03-27-2008, 09:00 AM
 
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Here's CNN's coverage: Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas grows more than any other U.S. city - Mar. 27, 2008
From the article:
Quote:
A few cities were among both the fastest growing and the areas with the biggest population jumps. And two of those double-hitters were in North Carolina. Raleigh, N.C., was the third fastest-growing metro area, up 4.7%, and ranked 12th with a population gain of 47,052. Charlotte, N.C., was the 7th fastest-growing metro area, up 4.2%, and ranked 6th with a gain of 66,724.

Raleigh and Charlotte have been growing rapidly for close to 30 years, according to Bill Tillman, state demographer of the North Carolina Office of State Budget and Management. Research Triangle Park, a science and technology hub, and the increasing number of national banks based in Charlotte are the area's biggest draws.
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Old 03-27-2008, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Wake Forest
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Found this statement in the CNN coverage article interesting, "
"The big story in these numbers is that they are putting the breaks on the fast growth," said Frey. The effects of the slowing economy and the housing crunch began to set in during the first half of 2007, and will be more pronounced in the next census."

What will the next census show? With housing starts down and new job creation down as the above states the 'breaks' are being applied all over including here.

I should have quoted the website I pulled the quote from. Sorry. Here is the website for clarification.
Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas grows more than any other U.S. city - Mar. 27, 2008

Last edited by autumngal; 03-27-2008 at 12:12 PM.. Reason: member added link :)
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Old 03-27-2008, 11:21 AM
 
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Please let them have air brakes to really stop sprawl here.
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Old 03-27-2008, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Durham, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saturnfan View Post
Please let them have air brakes to really stop sprawl here.
You don't need to put breaks on growth to control sprawl. What we need is smarter growth, directed upward rather than outward, and also in more dense settings that allow people to get around without always getting in their car.
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Old 03-27-2008, 12:49 PM
 
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Smarter, better planned growth would be wonderful! Perhaps with developers working with conservationists to not mow down every single tree we have left.
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Old 03-27-2008, 01:58 PM
 
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I second (or third, as the case may be) smarter growth. But it's not just density. We have to change zoning laws so that some businesses (retail and office) can actually locate within or directly next to large suburban tracts. That in itself would diminish the amount of travel people have to do on a daily basis. Brier Creek for example is reasonably dense with both shops and residences, but is absolutely horrible because it's impossible to get from one to the other without donning the armor of a car.
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Old 03-27-2008, 02:10 PM
 
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Smart Growth>>>>Slow Growth.
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Old 03-27-2008, 02:24 PM
 
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But how do you force the growth to slow down?

People can move here if they want, but most of them can't stay without employment. If there weren't jobs o be had, then people wouldn't move here. So it seems to me that the only way to slow down the growth is to make it more difficult or expensive for companies to do business here. So should the government discourage companies from moving here? Or somehow sabotage local companies so that they won't be as succesful and won't be able to afford to hire new people? Or is there another, saner option I don't know about?
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Old 03-27-2008, 04:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsSteel View Post
But how do you force the growth to slow down?

People can move here if they want, but most of them can't stay without employment. If there weren't jobs o be had, then people wouldn't move here. So it seems to me that the only way to slow down the growth is to make it more difficult or expensive for companies to do business here. So should the government discourage companies from moving here? Or somehow sabotage local companies so that they won't be as succesful and won't be able to afford to hire new people? Or is there another, saner option I don't know about?
Encourage concentration of both residences and businesses so public transit would work.
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