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Old 10-01-2008, 12:45 PM
 
22 posts, read 81,066 times
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Landscaping anyone? What are the do's and dont's? I want to landscape my home and build a pond in the backyard area. Will this addition give me a good ROI when I sell the home or should I skip it and spend more on what?

Any ideas would be appreciated! I was reading a "homes with a pool" thread and too was shocked that no one likes pools in this area.

I remember when my real estate agent was showing me houses here in NC, she mentioned that the next house we would be seeing was "not good" because it had a pool.

I'm from Miami and if a house HAS a pool , the chances of you selling it are much higher. No one really cares that there is maintanance on it since it's so cheap to upkeep or do it yourself (just like mowing the lawn). Maybe its more expensive here?

Ok, well back to my original question - are ponds a good investment for a home ? Let me know your thoughts!
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Old 10-01-2008, 12:53 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 65,518,175 times
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unless you planning on creating living space for humans in the pond it will not increase the value of a home.

It limits the type of buyers of the home. I would turn around if I saw they had a pond.

Mosquitoes, kid traps, and duck poo oh my
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Old 10-01-2008, 02:42 PM
 
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Do you mean a small, manageable goldfish pond for the garden? Or a much larger-scale pond?

Either is much, much easier to maintain than a pool, but potential parents may be turned off by a water feature. However, a small goldfish pond would be easier for them to change (if necessary) than a large-scale, actual pond.
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Old 10-01-2008, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, FL
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Are you talking about a small ornamental pond with a waterfall, koi or fish in it? Or are you talking about something more substantial that a backhoe digs out on something with several acres? Ornamental ponds really don't add any value. May look nice, but they do require maintenance (I have one and wish I never went down that road). Maybe a waterfall would be nice for ambiance, but I would skip the pond if I had to do it over. If you want one, do it for your own pleasure.
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Old 10-01-2008, 04:06 PM
 
22 posts, read 81,066 times
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Ahhh all good suggestions. In response to everyone , yes - I'm talking about an ornamental pond.

Janecj - how much does it cost you a month to maintain? It would be a very small one about 8ft. I know that people think mosquitos might come along but they do only with stagnant water. The pond would have a filtration system.

So more gardening and leave the pond out is the consensus?
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Old 10-01-2008, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
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If you live in Creedmoor I do know someone right in your area that does that and a good job at it. PM me and I will get you that info.
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Old 10-01-2008, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Pittsboro
82 posts, read 278,471 times
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I'll throw my 2 cents in here for the other type of pond, a natural earthen dam pond. I built a 1 acre, 14 foot deep pond about 5 years ago and absolutely love it. It's stocked with bass, bluegill and catfish, and there is nothing like grabbing a fishing rod and walking to your own pond and landing a nice fish. There is some maintenance involved just keeping the area mowed and weed-whacked, but I only do that once a month or so in the summer. Lots of wildlife are attracted to any type of water feature, and that is as entertaining as doing any fishing. Another benefit is irrigation water, an unlimited supply. I don't water my grass yet, but someday may hook up to the pond to do the irrigation system. 1 acre of water 1 inch deep is over 27,000 gallons of water.
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Old 10-01-2008, 06:15 PM
rfb
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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I had a friend who had a small pond with goldfish. He ended up having to put some netting over the top, as a resident hawk took to swooping down and taking the fish from the pond. Just something to keep in mind.
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Old 10-01-2008, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Creedmoor
148 posts, read 676,817 times
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Done right, ponds can be a great addition to your landscape package - and your ROI on professional landscaping is at least dollar for dollar, if not more. A well built pond that is filtered and has circulating water does not attract mosquitos...and the sound of the water over a waterfall is very relaxing.
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Old 10-01-2008, 07:25 PM
 
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I myself built a 9x9 pond using a liner from Lowes.
We have 3 turtles that live there.
I''m amazed how much wildlife migrates to water, birds, frogs, etc.
I added a waterfall which is part of the filtration system, the water draws through a 1x1 ft filter and shoots back into the pond over stacked rocks. The thing probably cost $200 and we love it.
Untill I added a fence, deer came and drank from it.
The Red Barn off the 70 in Clayton is an ideal place to get the rocks.
Digging the hole was the worst part, if you have clay like me wet the soil first or wait till after a good rain.
Check out Lowes garden center and use a liner not the preformed, that way you can make it as big as you want.

Hope that helps!
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