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Old 04-30-2007, 12:14 PM
 
478 posts, read 1,953,377 times
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Please tell me why accepted laws of real estate do not apply to so much of North Raleigh. We looked at subdivisions which have airplane noise ('you can only hear it when you're outside, and only mornings and evenings', they say) due to proximity to flight path, zero amenities ('everyone just goes to the YMCA'), and are priced at high $700s.

Why would anyone pay for this? I understand people come from outside NC and are keen (aka greedy) to get a home size they could never typically afford in their area. But why would people be willing to pay so much for so little? And resale value: these airports usually get bigger, not smaller, more money is invested in more international flights, and more flights overall. Who wants to be at the mercy of that, even if one fancies himself a good community protestor (wrt to airplane noise)?
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Old 04-30-2007, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Wake Forest, NC
842 posts, read 3,087,016 times
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Well...a few reasons....

1) There's a limited amount of land in Wake county that within close proximity to RTP (where most high-paying jobs are located).
2) Lots of people travel for their jobs, so they want to be close to the airport.
3) In 20 years, the flight path won't make a difference because they'll have invented the silent fuel-celled airplane. :-)

But I'm with you...I wouldn't want to be under a flight path myself.
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Old 04-30-2007, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Asheville, NC
648 posts, read 2,840,671 times
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Combine "in Wake County" with "near Research Triangle Park" and the dollar signs start to add up it seems. That's my guess...
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Old 04-30-2007, 12:39 PM
 
124 posts, read 477,887 times
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Default Blessing and a curse

North Raleigh in demand now but in 20 years if growth continues and the airport does indeed add more flights, there is a risk of devaluation of this area. One thing Raleigh has is land in all 4 directions. I found the noise very worrisome when visiting Morrisville, though not as worrisome in N. Raleigh.
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Old 04-30-2007, 01:03 PM
 
546 posts, read 2,306,221 times
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It makes no sense what so ever... My husband and I have shook our heads at this for years. "If you build it they will come..."
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Old 04-30-2007, 02:10 PM
 
478 posts, read 1,953,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nclover View Post
It makes no sense what so ever... My husband and I have shook our heads at this for years. "If you build it they will come..."
Then 'they' are more desperate than I thought!

Does make sense that one would want proximity to RTP, and possibly those same people need access to airport.

But I would not spend that kind of money to live under a flight path. It's amazing to me someone can say with a straight face, 'you only hear it when you're outside, and it's only mornings and evenings'. Yeah, only!
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Old 04-30-2007, 02:18 PM
 
Location: North Raleigh
578 posts, read 2,948,216 times
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You can say this same thing about a lot of developments in the Raleigh area. I saw developments in Wake Forest with the biggest power cable structures I've ever seen running right through (not year but right through it) the development. Yet they sell like hot cakes. Saw another in Wake Forest with moderate sized power cable structures running through the development but it also had the steepest sloped yards I'd ever seen. Some of them had 30' retaining walls just to meek out a mere 12' swath of back yard. And of course they're selling like hot cakes too.

Answer: There is no seemingly normal answer.
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Old 04-30-2007, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Wake Forest
3,124 posts, read 12,079,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gastric View Post
You can say this same thing about a lot of developments in the Raleigh area. I saw developments in Wake Forest with the biggest power cable structures I've ever seen running right through (not year but right through it) the development. Yet they sell like hot cakes. Saw another in Wake Forest with moderate sized power cable structures running through the development but it also had the steepest sloped yards I'd ever seen. Some of them had 30' retaining walls just to meek out a mere 12' swath of back yard. And of course they're selling like hot cakes too.

Answer: There is no seemingly normal answer.
The power lines always get me. We thought we found 'the house' and my husband saw it for the first time in the evening and loved it.

We viewed it in daylight a few days later....and low and behold...POWERLINES almost in the back yard. Deal breaker!
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Old 04-30-2007, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
8,269 posts, read 23,685,674 times
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Different things bother different people I guess. We're under a flight path and it has never really bothered me. I don't even notice it anymore. We're also just a few miles from the train tracks in Cary and I've gotten pretty used to those as well.
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Old 04-30-2007, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
146 posts, read 659,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lamishra View Post
Different things bother different people I guess.
Exactly. Some places have aircrafts - some have trains, busy roads/highways, power lines, landfills, etc. For many people, getting used to the noise is worth a short commute. For us, proximity to RTP and RDU was extremely important - more so than finding a place that was dead quiet.
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