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Old 07-14-2009, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
4,826 posts, read 13,788,837 times
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Can you say "CAP & TRADE"
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Old 07-14-2009, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Barrington
63,952 posts, read 43,817,785 times
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I do not think this is true of the entire state of NJ or at least it was not when I lived there.

It is however, a requirement of Howell Township:

http://www.twp.howell.nj.us/filestorage/3263/Revised_Housing_Application_5_21_09.pdf (broken link)

This does not address carpeting in the kitchen. It does however address cleanliness of flooring. So maybe that's the real issue.
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Old 05-21-2010, 11:12 AM
 
1 posts, read 2,782 times
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Carpet in kitchen -- highly flammable (esp. polyester), near flame sources. So, just remove carpet and
install linoleum (modern has no asbestos) or tile, ceramic or vinyl. And get a fire extinguisher. These
measures -- while now delay your sale -- will prevent the mass tragedy of a fire that destroys the home and people in it and the neighborhood. A CO certifies only that the home was safe when CO issued. So it is necessary -- after a few years of a residency, during which UNSAFE conditions can ARISE such as: termites, mold, other structural deterioration -- for public-safety municipal inspectors to REinspect a home, to ensure its soundness before again issuing a CO to certify the home is STILL FIT to live in. (A safe APPEARANCE can mislead, as there may be HIDDEN, "LATENT" DEFECTS such as mold and termite and other structural damage or deterioration such as deteriorated roof (from years of rain), electrical wiring, storm window frames, foundational cracks from bldg.'s continuing "settling" or sinking into ground, etc.

States such as NJ and PA that MANDATE these inspections are WISE. But states (e.g., NC and FL, past victims of mass housing damage from hurricanes (e.g., roofs easily flying off during gales) because of LAX or inadequate building codes and [as in NC] older wooden housing) are NOT PRUDENT -- "Let the buyer beware." Housing code regulations are NEEDED to prevent sellers (for profit) from selling a
SUBSTANDARD home to buyers (e.g., young, old) UNaware of a given home's health and safety issues.

There is always a conflict, tension between (thus, need to balance) individual rights (e.g., extent of freedoms) and public rights (that limit the freedom of one or some individuals to harm other/s). Such is life!
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Old 05-21-2010, 01:39 PM
 
5,253 posts, read 13,430,354 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Raleigh_Guy View Post
I have a family friend who is selling a 30 year old condo located in a retirement commutiny in Howell Township, NJ. This is not a condo in a large multi level building, it is similar to a SFH with a garage and yard except it shares a wall with a similar unit next door.

Anyway, in addition to having an appraisal and inspection done by the prospective buyer, apparently the town did an isnpection as well and has decided not to issue a certificate of occupancy (CO) becasue it has a a problem with carpet being on the floor in the kitchen.

My question is this, why does a new CO need to be issued by the town for a 30 year old house? I thought a CO was issued at the time of initial constrcution and after that whenever the house was sold and bought down the road the CO transfered with the purchase. I know when I bought my 5 year old resale house in NC I did not have to go through any CO inspection process.

Is this something unique to NJ? IF so, what is the reason? In any case, why would the town not issue a CO becasue there is carpet on the floor in the kitchen instead of tile? Seems like the town/State of NJ make it very difficult for homeowners to actually sell their houses. The buyer is fine with the house as is, but now the town is holding up the sale becasue they don't approve of my friend's 95 year old grandmother's flooring choices from 30 years ago!

I hope my question makes sense. Any insight would be greatly appreciated
Probably because NJ is way over-regulated. You still can't pump your own gas there can you??
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Old 05-21-2010, 01:43 PM
 
5,253 posts, read 13,430,354 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimtheGuy View Post
Probably because NJ is way over-regulated. You still can't pump your own gas there can you??
oops...I see I said about the same thing in 2007. I live in a "nanny" state too (MN). Politicians (especially liberals) seem to think that the citizens are all retarded and need to be protected from everything including themselves.
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Old 05-21-2010, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
40,933 posts, read 71,050,377 times
Reputation: 42439
Revival of three year old thread!

"IT'S ALI-I-I-I-IVE!"
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Old 05-21-2010, 01:51 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,578 posts, read 44,358,601 times
Reputation: 16246
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
Revival of three year old thread!

"IT'S ALI-I-I-I-IVE!"
And someone makes the same exact comment they made three years ago. Good stuff.
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Old 05-21-2010, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,488 posts, read 19,729,341 times
Reputation: 5397
Just another way for the government to reach into your pocket is all.

If it was truly because the government was concerned for peoples safety why not mandate that the inspections be done every 5 years. They push for as much as they can get away with.
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Old 05-21-2010, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL (Mandarin)
2,539 posts, read 6,090,680 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by manderly6 View Post
And someone makes the same exact comment they made three years ago. Good stuff.
Too funny!
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