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Old 02-17-2011, 03:38 PM
 
138 posts, read 402,489 times
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My husband and I are redoing our basement (took out old wood planks on the walls and replacing with drywall, also added recessed lighting and dimmers). We're looking at all flooring options and want to know what will give us the most bang for our buck. Our basement is divided into two parts, a storage area where the sump pump and bilco door is located and the other bigger side with laundry and 2nd bath is located. Do we tile, carpet, epoxy/paint the concrete on the nicer side? Do we leave the concrete alone on the storage side? What do buyers like for basement floors?
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Old 02-17-2011, 05:51 PM
 
28,460 posts, read 81,445,247 times
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Default Really depends on local standards and specific configuration of you home...

In my area (west suburban Chicago) many newer homes have the whole basement floor sealed with the "garage coating" type epoxy treatment.

If there is sufficient ceiling height for appropriate underlayment and access to daylight to justify having the space finished to a level that includes hardwood floors those are installed later.

If the nieghborhood / house is more modest carpet is an excellent option.

Hard flooring surfaces, like porcelien or ceramic tile are not popular unlessyou can get radiant heat down first -- cold feet are not pleasant!

Portions of the basement can have resilient flooring -- vinyl sheet goods, vinyl "tiles", as well as green touted products like natural linoluem /marmoluem or cork are sometimes seen too. The semi-temporary interlocking rubber products are great for work-out and storage areas.

SHOP CAREFULLY -- moisture issues and even temperature rated products can be deal killers, and if you do not read the details even a "fully guaraneteed" product installed / used in a way that is counter to the manufacturer's requirement will be EXPENSIVE to replace!
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Old 02-17-2011, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Athens
470 posts, read 1,443,410 times
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A lot of it really depends upon what the basement is used for. Will it be an entertainment center? Bedrooms, 2nd kitchen, workshop, utility, workout, etc. Finish it like you would any room, with consideration for any moisture issues.
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Old 02-17-2011, 10:18 PM
 
Location: New York
158 posts, read 507,989 times
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For a basement you are probably safe with a beige/tan berber. I wouldn't use anything dark. Depending on the size you may be able to get remnant. Leave the storage side alone it will just get funky.
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Old 02-20-2011, 03:34 AM
 
Location: When idiots elect idiots you get an idiocracy
7,306 posts, read 9,072,903 times
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Deferring to Chets advice. If you can heat it I would consider tile. It avoids most moisture issues if any. There are tiles that look like wood laminate flooring even. Also if your basement is more of a hobby/work room you might look into resilient "garage tiles" by companies like Race Deck. (google it) These are mainly for garages but might be a solution for basement flooring.
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Old 02-20-2011, 01:59 PM
 
Location: When idiots elect idiots you get an idiocracy
7,306 posts, read 9,072,903 times
Reputation: 15435
Next morning update. I just remembered the "allure" resilient flooring. It is designed for that sort of application and goes in like laminate.
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Old 02-20-2011, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Kailua Kona, HI
3,199 posts, read 12,900,042 times
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Anything but carpet! People can use large area rugs if desired but I would never put wall to wall carpet in a basement.
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