Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-21-2010, 06:25 PM
 
4,794 posts, read 12,381,466 times
Reputation: 8404

Advertisements

I have wondered about those expensive high rise condominiums you see in places like Miami Beach or New York or along the lakeshore in Chicago. Has anyone ever lived in one of those?
Can you hear your neighbors thumping around upstairs like you can in lots of apartments or do most of those places have better soundproofing?
I would hate to think of paying outrageous sums to live in places like that and then hear you neighbor everyday moving around in the kitchen upstairs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-21-2010, 08:48 PM
 
92 posts, read 230,132 times
Reputation: 129
The only experience I have is in high rises along the East Coast and Gulf, but they are much quieter than a basic apartment building. High rises have concrete construction as opposed to wood framing, which is a much better sound insulator. In Chicago, I couldn't say since they might have different interior construction due to not having to meet hurricane codes.

And, I totally agree about paying to not have to hear other people. That is what drove me the nuttiest during apartment living, especially since there's always that one neighbor who is a night-owl, or must hop from room to room, or plays some insanely loud musical instrument, etc. Hope you can find something quieter!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2010, 04:25 AM
 
777 posts, read 1,873,919 times
Reputation: 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by dolphin40 View Post
High rises have concrete construction as opposed to wood framing, which is a much better sound insulator.
I somewhat disagree. For years I owned and lived in a unit on a high floor in a high-rise condo. The building was brand new back in the early 1990s when I bought the unit. Floor/ceiling slabs were concrete, but interior framing between the individual units was drywall attached to metal studs. It was hardly soundproof, in fact, quite the opposite. The concrete slabs carried sound throughout the building, and the drywall on metal studs not only amplified, but actually carried sound through units/party walls.

My personal opinion, stay away from any new or new-ish construction. A 30- or 40-year old highrise, that's likely another story.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2010, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Marion, IN
8,189 posts, read 31,244,197 times
Reputation: 7344
I have seen quite a few apartment buildings that were turned in to condos. No difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2010, 04:44 PM
 
2,719 posts, read 5,361,017 times
Reputation: 6257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Racelady88 View Post
I have seen quite a few apartment buildings that were turned in to condos. No difference.
Old apartment buildings that are converted are usually much quieter than new construction at least around here. The new stuff is quickly built and probably on the cheap.

I viewed a few units in a brand new six unit building with my mother and sister and while they were looking at one unit, I was in the one next door and you could hear every word spoken in the next apartment over. I knocked on the wall and it sounded hollow. A lot of the people walking through were talking about it as well.

These were 2 bedroom units listed at $489k.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2010, 06:59 PM
 
4,918 posts, read 22,689,094 times
Reputation: 6303
They are more expensive because of location.

As for quiet, as said above, many apartment buildings have been converted to condos so apt/condo means nothing. And there have been condos built that went bust and are now apartments so again apt/condo means nothing.

Its the constructiuon and not the lable of apartment or condo or co-op or whatever is being used.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Dallas area
8 posts, read 33,757 times
Reputation: 14
Default Advice for high-rise living.

I live in a new mid-rise and was under the impression it would be quieter than a typical apartment and I am very disappointed. I asked about the construction and about the concrete barriers but I didn't check the answers I got. This is the loudest place I have ever lived, partly, I believe, because there is no carpet. I'm always joking about the riverdance crew/furniture movers that live above me! Also, because of where my unit is located has been problematic. There are two buildings and I live right between them on the outside facing the other building. There is a parking garage gate directly beneath me and one just across from me. There is also the built in dumpster below me next to the gate. When someone moves in, this is where the moving trucks are situated. I feel as though I'm living in an industrial park with beeps all day from the gates being accessed, large trucks, loud movers, metal bangs and thumps, waste management trucks beeping and lifting the large dumpster and seemingly throwing it back down causing the building to shake. I work from home and often think I need to get an outside office just for a little peace and quiet. I'm an apartment locator and should have known better but I didn't because it was my first highrise/midrise experience. Be warned!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 10:59 PM
 
Location: USA
4 posts, read 20,752 times
Reputation: 10
Condominiums?
What is the difference between condos and apartments?
Is it much cozier that the modern apartment?
That's why they are much more costly that apartments.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2010, 06:52 PM
 
2,685 posts, read 6,050,016 times
Reputation: 952
I live in an older high rise condo and it is much much quieter then apartments. I rarely hear my neighbors, mainly just noise from outside. Like anything of course it can vary greatly from building to building. Ours has concrete walls and therefore is quiet. Some newer buildings I could imagine may not be that way if the developer built them on the cheap. As always do your research.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2015, 10:55 PM
 
1 posts, read 17,423 times
Reputation: 11
I'm thinking of buying a unit in an older high rise building(1977). I went in for tour of the place specifically to test the soundproofing. I play the piano, and was told that the sound only travels through one side of the building into the centre hallway. Because this is a corner unit and I would have east and west facing views in the living room I'm not worried too much about floor to floor or side to side noise transmission.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top