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Old 03-24-2011, 08:08 AM
 
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A recent thread asks what people are looking for in houses:

//www.city-data.com/forum/real-...ow-houses.html

For realtors, buyers, past sellers, and future buyers in rural/semi-rural areas: are there any differences? (Do people still care about granite countertops, or are they more likely to be inspecting the pasture fence? Are they more interested in hardwood floors or outbuildings?) What have been the deal-breakers, the selling points, and the deciding factors for you and/or your clients?
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Old 03-24-2011, 08:51 AM
 
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I think I would qualify as looking for a home in a semi-rural area in that I want neighbors but not right on top of me, but not out in the middle of no where, either. Around here that would be considered 'semi-rural.' About two acres would be ideal. When we look, we aren't really expecting to find high-end updates since we are mentally allocating a higher percentage of the purchase price to land and not 'house' if that makes sense. If the house comes all updated, great, but since we figure more money is going to the acreage itself, we are willing to cut some slack to the interior of the home because of our interest in the land itself. The smaller the lot/acreage, the more I am expecting to see updates/higher-end appliances, etc., since for the same 'X' price we would pay, the house itself needs to make up for less acreage.

Personal preference, again, for outbuildings. We would love to find a detached garage in addition to one attached to the home. My husband is a car guy and needs a place to store them. However, we've seen some properties that just had too many outbuildings, and they were new and expensive. We had no need for them and clearly the price of the home was reflecting the addition of these new buildings. Might have been perfect for someone else though.

And on a side note re: granite countertops. I really don't like walking in and seeing them because, chances are, I won't love their choice of color/pattern but I know that 1, I'm going to be paying for those countertops in the purchase price of the home and 2, I'm going to be hard-pressed to chuck their granite for stone that I like better - so I am going to have to live with their choice of granite. I'm one of those buyers that loves walking into a home with bad, out-dated laminate because then I feel justified in putting in my own choice of a pricey countertop. ////off of soapbox///
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Old 03-24-2011, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Mokelumne Hill, CA & El Pescadero, BCS MX.
6,958 posts, read 20,336,785 times
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I hate using a broad brush, but in general, those of us that live in the country have far different values than city folk. We don't dress for success, we don't buy a new car until the old one wears out, we don't follow popular culture very much (although I do know a couple of people that watch American Idol). We also don't have fancy homes with all the upgrades. Almost all political views are tolerated and nobody cares much about race or gender issues.

In my part of the world the terrain is quite varied and my experience with buyers is that they are looking for a home that fits in the place it's located. Got a view? Great, does the house take advantage of it? Can I see the neighbors? Not so easy a sale. Can I hear the neighbors? Almost the same thing. The ability to connect with the natural world is high up on the list. When I'm at the store, I hear people talking about the moon phases and the stars, something I can honestly say I never heard growing up in the city. I guess you might call it a holistic vibe is probably the most important thing to a rural buyer.

I think rural people are looking to have their privacy, but I've also found that it's not a matter of being anti-social. As a matter of fact, the people in my community are generally quite willing to pitch in an any project that benefits the community as a whole.
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Old 03-24-2011, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Perry South, Pittsburgh, PA
1,437 posts, read 2,614,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMenscha View Post
I hate using a broad brush, but in general, those of us that live in the country have far different values than city folk. We don't dress for success, we don't buy a new car until the old one wears out, we don't follow popular culture very much (although I do know a couple of people that watch American Idol). We also don't have fancy homes with all the upgrades. Almost all political views are tolerated and nobody cares much about race or gender issues.
Boy you must seriously live in a sheltered rural area, because that's not even 1% of the rural areas I've been to.
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Old 03-24-2011, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Mokelumne Hill, CA & El Pescadero, BCS MX.
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Yep!
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Old 03-24-2011, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Connecticut is my adopted home.
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For me:

Some acreage, water rights or an abundant well, fences and useful multi-purpose outbuildings in decent condition, ditto for the house, grown trees around the house, a wooded patch and a good sized level area on the property for gardens, decent sun exposure, not too far off the beaten path, no area hazards such as flood zone, high radon levels, ground water contamination issues etc.

A classic home that has been recently updated in a way that enhances and respects the integrity of the original home design done in neutral shades for lasting installations such as stone, mature fruit trees and a greenhouse would have me shelling out quite a bit of extra cash.
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Old 03-24-2011, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Dallas area
171 posts, read 741,796 times
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We are in the process of selling a rural home. I am one of the rare people that has kept my house updated in our neighborhood. We have current paint colors, hardwood floors, granite. We did it because we liked it.
Then hubby got transferred.
Turns out rural folks don't care so much about my updates. They are complaining there aren't more outbuildings, barns, or more land. Our listing clearly says 2 acres, but many of them are expecting not to see a neighbor for miles? I even posted a satellite photo for reference because we were tired of hearing "We were hoping not to see any neighbors" as feedback.
(The neighbors are NOT on top of us, by any means.)
So, because of our updates and how pretty it looks (if I do say so myself. ) we are attracting a lot of city folk who come out and say things like "The house is great. Wish we could move it in town."
Insert "banging head" emoticon.
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Old 03-25-2011, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Snellville, GA
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I've got 2 clients currently looking for their 'almost rural' dream home. Seems that privacy plays a big role in their choice (both are looking for 2-3 acres) - the way the house sits on the land (and away from neighbors).

Septic doesn't seem to be a concern, since most potentials have that instead of sewer. Water isn't a big concern either.

Outbuildings are nice - more sheds/garages than barns - gives added 'workspace room.'

There's been a couple of homes that were recently built and, it seems, that the owners got into some distress situation and the homes were a great price. Being more recently built, they had the larger closets, more updated kitchens and bathrooms.
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Old 03-25-2011, 09:36 AM
 
4,329 posts, read 8,186,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peachstatehomegal View Post
There's been a couple of homes that were recently built and, it seems, that the owners got into some distress situation and the homes were a great price. Being more recently built, they had the larger closets, more updated kitchens and bathrooms.
And do your rural clients put much importance on the larger closets and updates?

We definitely have the closets: seven walk-ins (5 br, office, and front closet). Or eight, if you count the one under the stairs.
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Old 03-25-2011, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
37,093 posts, read 64,465,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sll3454 View Post
And do your rural clients put much importance on the larger closets and updates?

We definitely have the closets: seven walk-ins (5 br, office, and front closet). Or eight, if you count the one under the stairs.
You know, just as every property is unique, every buyer is different.
When people get out and see what is available, their wants and needs often become re-ordered.

Sometimes the rural buyer ends up in town because the details of the house turn out to be more important than living rurally. Actually, this happens quite often.

But, folks who have to have open space, or no zoning or covenant limitations for business or horses, etc, will compromise more on the home than they will on the land.
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