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Old 07-14-2011, 06:53 PM
 
7 posts, read 35,124 times
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I have a home inspection and sewer line inspection completed, and have til tomorrow to counter offer. The sewer line:

Hired a camera sewer inspection. Roots were found in the sewer line (old clay pipes). The plumber said he wouldn't worry about the roots if he were buying the place. He said the connections were good, and he didn't see anything to worry about. He did say that I would have to have the roots taken out every year. When I related this information to my father, my father said to get estimates on changing the sewer lines because he's had sewer lines collapse.

Home inspector said that I would need to add a chimney liner, and have someone check some points where the mortar was coming out in parts of the chimney.

Since the accepted offer is contingent upon a what is found in these inspections, what's reasonable for a counter offer?
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Old 07-14-2011, 06:59 PM
 
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Neither of these are "major" issues on a home inspection. Yes, a possible sewer collapse could be costly, however the plumber said the line was in good shape-roots in the line are no big deal if the line is in good shape, $400 for Roto Rooter to come out and cut them off. A chimney liner also isn't expensive and really not something that is worth "counter offering" on. The house was probably priced to accommodate normal wear and tear, which these fall under. Now, if the roof was ready to collapse, that would be something to counter with.
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Old 07-14-2011, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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I'd agree -- neither are imminent safety issues and neither are the result of neglect by the homeowner.
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Old 07-14-2011, 07:09 PM
 
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Default I forgot to mention the garage...

The one car, detached garage is leaning towards the neighbor's garage (shared driveway), and sunlight is coming in through the slates. It has wood siding (recently painted), and a new roof, and a newer garage door and opener that are functional. The home inspector did say that that may come down on the neighbor's garage. Should I go back to the seller with any pricing to replace that?
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Old 07-14-2011, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Central Fl
2,903 posts, read 11,358,765 times
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There are so many variables here that one could not possibly answer your question on this forum.
We do not know price points, competition with other buyers, cost of remedies, etc,etc,etc......

In the end only you can decide how bad you want this home....only you know the answers to the questions above.

Frank
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Old 07-14-2011, 07:45 PM
 
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Default Sorry Frank

Thanks for the reply. I'll figure it out.
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Old 07-14-2011, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Central Fl
2,903 posts, read 11,358,765 times
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No reason to say sorry....we try to be helpful here, but in this case there is just too many other considerations to really give a good answer.

On a million dollar house these things would be minor...on a $40k house they may not be, as the fixes could be a larger portion of your total cost.

Of the problems you mention, the garage seems to be something to we concerned about. Hard to say without seeing it. you really have to have a knowledgeable person look at it to see how expensive a fix it would be.

I've fixed some garages easily...but I've also taken some down and just built a new one....

Good luck on whatever you do.


Frank
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Old 07-14-2011, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Boston Suburb
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My thought is that if there are no other buyers, it doesn't hurt to counter.... at worst you get a flat response like 'Take it as it is'. If the market you're in is real slow and buyers are hard to come by, you might just get back some money to fix those things. If houses have no problem selling or the seller has other buyers lined up, sellers will just take the next person down the line if you demand anything.
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Old 07-15-2011, 12:07 AM
 
28,461 posts, read 74,442,419 times
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I think the OP shows signs of being less than familiar with the general process. Once a offer is made by the buyer and agreed to the seller the procedure in most parts of the US is for there to a period that allows for an inspection of the property. The results of that inspection may be used to allow the buyer to withdraw their offer, continue on toward to closing, or make a request of the seller address issues that are unacceptable.

The general procedure is NOT to use the results of the inspection to make a new offer.

The term "counter offer" is generally given to the offer(s) submitted during the NEGOTIATION PHASE that happens BEFORE come agreement.

In this specific case a well informed seller SHOULD have anticipated that many MINOR items consistent with the age and overall condition of an older home would be part of a thorough home inspector's report and COULD have constructed the contract to allow for specific limits / allowances of what could be done to encourage the deal to move forward. Asking for concessions beyond what is reasonable is unwise. Asking in a way that shows an unfamiliarity with the process may invite a wiser seller's agent to recommend a more reasonable buyer.

Parents, although by definition always OLDER than their children, are by no means automatically WISER and listening to one's father (or mother) who has no special expertise in either sewer lines or home purchasing, may inadvertently give advice that is neither accurate nor useful.

Similarly if the garage is in a condition that sunlight is coming through the "slates" (but has new roof? made of slate? on a garage???? new siding too?? ) one would assume the seller is aware of this condition and has priced the property accordingly. What sort of inspector says a "garage may come down on neighbor's??? I MAY get hit by a bus if one comes crashing through a red light, but odds are STRONGLY against that...
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Old 07-15-2011, 05:13 AM
 
574 posts, read 1,458,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HydrangeaHeaven View Post
I have a home inspection and sewer line inspection completed, and have til tomorrow to counter offer. The sewer line:

Hired a camera sewer inspection. Roots were found in the sewer line (old clay pipes). The plumber said he wouldn't worry about the roots if he were buying the place. He said the connections were good, and he didn't see anything to worry about. He did say that I would have to have the roots taken out every year. When I related this information to my father, my father said to get estimates on changing the sewer lines because he's had sewer lines collapse.

Listen to your father as he is right! As for the plumber saying it is not a problem then ask the plumber to put that in writing along with putting their recommendations in writing. While the plumber is putting it in writing also ask them to put in writing a quote for repairs. Where did you find this plumber, from your agent? You will be surprised how fast that plumber will change their tune when you ask them to put it in writing!

Home inspector said that I would need to add a chimney liner, and have someone check some points where the mortar was coming out in parts of the chimney.

Having these repairs performed is not a cheap fix. Of course you will have others claim that it is but cheap is relative to how much you can afford to pay for out of your own pocket.

Since the accepted offer is contingent upon a what is found in these inspections, what's reasonable for a counter offer?

Have all of the problems estimated for repairs by professionals and not hack weekend handymen. Take the estimate amount and subtract it from your offer and that is a reasonable counteroffer. The owner can counter that if they want and you can work from there.
Answers in blue italic above.
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