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Old 11-01-2013, 09:27 AM
 
8,407 posts, read 11,231,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luluwas View Post
it was just hard to hear how uninformed people are and sometimes just down right ignorant.
Well, this is the United States of America. Get used to it.
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Old 11-01-2013, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,759 posts, read 4,952,902 times
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It's a requirement in Montgomery, Howard and Frederick Counties in Maryland for new home and apartment construction. As a builder, we just view it as another impact fee. Frederick allows you to pay a fee in lieu of constructing these homes, Howard's MIHU program has had difficulty selling the low income homes and Montgomery's MPDU program slashes the price to nearly 1/3 of a comparable market rate home.

These are relegated to town home developments in my experience. It's not a free ride for the buyer either. There are numerous deed restrictions in place so you don't purchase one then sell and make a huge profit.
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Old 11-01-2013, 09:56 AM
 
8,407 posts, read 11,231,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kim in FL View Post
I'm for affordable housing (people have to live somewhere) but I'm not for Section 8 houses smack dab in the middle of a middle class neighborhood. Put them in other low income areas.
Yep, we gotta keep them low-lifes in their place, right?

While I disagree with how the Section 8 program is administered, I disagree more with the type of intolerance exhibited by your post. The primary reason for placing affordable housing opportunities within regular communities was to avoid the situation of perpetuating slum neighborhoods, and to avoid stigmatizing people and perpetuating a cycle of dependency. We can argue about whether it is working, or talk about how we could improve things, but I just find the prevalent notion that "some people don't deserve to live under better living conditions" rather appalling.
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Old 11-01-2013, 11:57 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,497 posts, read 25,488,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kim in FL View Post
Nor am I for "low income" units within a 'regular' complex. Either it's a low income complex or it's not...no in between.
The way it works in my city is that the apartment complexes get a grant from HUD to cover some of their building costs (or remodeling costs). In return, they agree to provide a certain number of affordable apartments to people who meet certain income guidelines for a certain number of years. Once their obligation is fulfilled, they go back to charging full price for the apartments.

I looked into it when I was living in apartments, because I am a SAHM and we like to save money wherever possible. If I could pay $800 for an apartment instead of $1100, that would have been a good thing. We didn't end up doing it because at the complexes we looked at, the affordable apartments were all on the third or fourth floor (no elevators) and I have a disability that makes climbing that many stairs difficult.
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Old 11-01-2013, 02:11 PM
 
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Don't want it anywhere near me.
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Old 11-01-2013, 03:57 PM
 
10,748 posts, read 24,560,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackmichigan View Post
Yep, we gotta keep them low-lifes in their place, right?

While I disagree with how the Section 8 program is administered, I disagree more with the type of intolerance exhibited by your post. The primary reason for placing affordable housing opportunities within regular communities was to avoid the situation of perpetuating slum neighborhoods, and to avoid stigmatizing people and perpetuating a cycle of dependency. We can argue about whether it is working, or talk about how we could improve things, but I just find the prevalent notion that "some people don't deserve to live under better living conditions" rather appalling.

The OP asked how we felt about it, I told him/her how I felt about.

If you want to debate it, take it to the debate forum. You don't have to agree with me, in fact, I don't care what you think. I never said anyone was a 'low life' that was your term, all I said was "not in my neighborhood...if they can't afford to live here on their own dime, why should the live here on a govts dime?"
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Old 11-01-2013, 04:02 PM
 
10,748 posts, read 24,560,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
The way it works in my city is that the apartment complexes get a grant from HUD to cover some of their building costs (or remodeling costs). In return, they agree to provide a certain number of affordable apartments to people who meet certain income guidelines for a certain number of years. Once their obligation is fulfilled, they go back to charging full price for the apartments.

I looked into it when I was living in apartments, because I am a SAHM and we like to save money wherever possible. If I could pay $800 for an apartment instead of $1100, that would have been a good thing. We didn't end up doing it because at the complexes we looked at, the affordable apartments were all on the third or fourth floor (no elevators) and I have a disability that makes climbing that many stairs difficult.
We have a couple of places like that here....they are so full of crime that all the 'full rent' people have moved out and the city had no choice but to turn one of them into a low income housing complex (project). They now have a police substation on site manned 24/7 and do monthly 'sweeps' of the units.
Not a place I'd ever be caught in. Sad thing is, there are good, law abiding families living there and getting caught up in the crap.
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Old 11-01-2013, 05:07 PM
 
4,676 posts, read 9,441,721 times
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Once again... the conversation goes from "affordable" to HUD subsidized and Sec 8 housing.

The "affordable" housing townhomes and some small (1200 sqft) single family homes (no garages) in my area are priced around $255,000. Add $5500 plus for taxes...........plus insurance...........

Buyers have to qualify just like those buying million dollar properties.
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Old 11-01-2013, 06:00 PM
 
Location: GA
399 posts, read 542,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kim in FL View Post
not in my neighborhood...
I will agree that that is what you said... not in my neighborhood

(because they're beneath me). <--- you didn't say that, but that's what you meant. Because it's not like all those high class folks living in multi-million dollar homes don't commit crime. You'd just prefer high class crime, right? Drug king pins, money launderers... stuff like that.
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Old 11-01-2013, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Portsmouth, VA
6,513 posts, read 7,831,088 times
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It can go either way. A new luxury housing project in Norfolk is built thanks to the US Government. So what part of that complex is affordable housing, and how do the people that can afford luxury prices feel about this? To be fair, the complex is not built in a high income neighborhood to begin with, and I do not personally see anything luxurious about the location; yes it is next to the water, but there aren't any amenities in that neighborhood.

I do agree that the miseducation of buyers has a lot to do with the prejudice, but I also agree that the local governments have not done a great job of educating those buyers either. Local governments are not building housing projects anymore, and there is only but so much Section 8 to go around, so now we get affordable housing, as a new requirement for new housing projects that command rents that are already higher than what the average person could afford anyway.

Part of the irony in Hampton Roads, is that new apartment complexes are charging exorbitant rents, and anyone that can afford those rents that can get a mortgage, does get a mortgage and pays for a home or a townhome. So once again, the working poor are those stuck renting apartments. If I could afford $1,300 a month for rent, I could save up my money or build my credit and save enough money to purchase a home could I not? So then why would I rent in one of these mid-rise apartment complexes, when the developers are not building anything into the developments? I still have to cross the street and take my life into my hands, running across several lanes of traffic to get to retail; I would rather drive from my home and play it safe.

So now you have the paradox of setting aside $800 to $900 a month units for those with good credit in the same development where everyone else pays $1,300 a month. But the bottom line is that people that can afford $1,300 a month are too good to live next to the $800 crowd. Plus the $800 crowd is accustomed to living in Section 8, and before that, were accustomed to living in housing projects. This type of setup might work in NYC where $3,000 a month set aside is considered to be affordable housing, and everyone else has a $300,000 mortgage or more, IDK, but here that $500 difference is often the difference between open air drug and prostitution markets and public transportation to living in a good school district and driving a SUV.
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