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Old 11-02-2013, 03:43 AM
 
10,749 posts, read 24,551,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmk31088 View Post
I will agree that that is what you said... not in my neighborhood

(because they're beneath me). <--- you didn't say that, but that's what you meant. Because it's not like all those high class folks living in multi-million dollar homes don't commit crime. You'd just prefer high class crime, right? Drug king pins, money launderers... stuff like that.

Again, if you want to debate this, take it over to the debate forum. I answered the question asked and if you dont' like the answer, don't read it.
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Old 11-02-2013, 03:58 AM
 
Location: Oregon
895 posts, read 1,584,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luluwas View Post
apparently this conjures up some negative connotations to neighbors? sure does make a house hard to sell!
affordable housing is significantly different from low income housing. and most towns (in my neck of the woods-central NJ) now require new developments to have a portion dedicated to affordable housing.
i am amazed as to how people think these are reserved for sub humans and that your house and your neighborhood is no longer safe.....
anyone experience this attitude or these complexes being developed?
i now know why my house is becoming hard to sell, because there is a new development of luxury rentals going up and a portion of them are affordable units.
i think affordable housing AND subsidized housing are very much needed and don't necessarily mean bad residents. like all new residents they can be screened for criminal past (as renters), or other hindrances. As long as you apply the same quality standards (within reason) to all, it isn't unlawful discrimination and you can get good renters.

as for your house not selling, i wouldn't really assume that your reasons given are the only or primary reasons why it isn't selling. keep seeking ways of making your home more attractive to buyers, find the right buyer markets and advertise there, and also, find out more ways of presenting the sale and offering terms - and reasons to buy-- that are a win win situation that the buyer recognizes as an advantage to themselves. i think a person needs to read up well on real estate ed in order to know what to do in selling OR buying.
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Old 11-02-2013, 08:41 AM
 
Location: GA
399 posts, read 542,015 times
Reputation: 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kim in FL View Post
Again, if you want to debate this, take it over to the debate forum. I answered the question asked and if you dont' like the answer, don't read it.
There's nothing to debate. You have your opinion, I have mine.
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Old 11-02-2013, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
39,954 posts, read 70,648,639 times
Reputation: 64338
I love affordable housing!

Otherwise, I wouldn't be able to keep a roof over my head.

I suspect many of us are in the same boat.
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Old 11-03-2013, 11:56 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
30,929 posts, read 42,553,169 times
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I'd be slow to purchase in a neighborhood of very expensive houses where government mandated affordable housing was just being built.

In an established area, where the affordable housing had been there for several years and I could see how it was being maintained and what the crime stats were, it might not be so much of an issue.

In a high rent area, I would expect beautiful landscaping at an apartment building. If rents are artificially reduced, perhaps there would not be enough income for the landlord to maintain landscaping or even to do the maintenance needed to keep the buildings looking good.

That's a risk with a building that is under construction. There is now ay to know how well it will be managed or what the rental criteria will be.
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:21 PM
 
1,260 posts, read 1,935,213 times
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Here in Boulder, CO there are several affordable housing programs. As far as I know one of them has units (mostly 2-3 bedroom condos) within regular (pretty pricey, as most housing in Boulder proper) complexes. I would estimate the prices of these affordable units as being about 20% below market price of the comparable units. The maximum income to get into the program is also not too low. The result is lower middle class families being able to afford housing in Boulder, while being neighbors with rich yuppies. I think it works very well. I know of a family who qualifies and bought one of these units. They can only sell back into the program, but as it is, they are happy with their home - it allows them to live close to good schools, recreation and everything else a young family needs.
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:46 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,452 posts, read 14,163,777 times
Reputation: 12512
This was the stated reasoning for a California 60-unit low-income seniors housing project to be denied last month:

"Opponents said the chosen site...is zoned for single-family homes...low density. Several people who bought homes in that area were very concerned about their investments (which are) based upon the promises of city zoning...it would result in an overconcentration of affordable housing in the area. They also argued that the cluster would increase traffic congestion and lower their home values."

The project was less than a mile from another such project. But the real reason for the denial was the vehemence of the property owners fighting it.
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Old 11-04-2013, 02:06 PM
 
Location: SoCal
542 posts, read 1,475,504 times
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I'm generally opposed to programs that disincentivize personal advancement, which "affordable housing" clearly does. If someone with low skills (and thus low pay) can magically afford to live in a high-demand area thanks to govt subsidies and whatnot, then they now have no incentive to advance their career and financial situation via legitimate means; along the same idea, now their employers have no incentive to raise their pay or promote them because these people are now willing to live on their current wages because they are now living in the area they want to be in. So now the employer is basically getting to pay below-market wages for the worker because the worker is getting subsidized housing. Effectively, we are subsidizing the employer with tax money. Of course, govt programs never end up helping those they are intended to help.

I just read an article this weekend (by coincidence) about "affordable housing" being built here in Orange County CA. Some of these families were sharing apartments before (4 adults and about 5 or 6 kids in a 2 bedroom apartment), and now each family gets their own 2 bedroom apartment, paying about 60% of market rate. So the rest of us are all subsidizing these families who decided to have kids they couldn't afford to support, and live in a high-demand area that they can't legitimately afford to live in. If we stopped subsidizing these people's lives, they wouldn't be able to afford to live or work here, and employers would have to offer higher wages (and perhaps benefits), thus enabling workers to afford to live here based on their income, not a subsidy.

As far as living near "affordable housing," I generally would stay clear of it if there were other good housing options that were not as close to it. Sure, some of the families who live in affordable housing are good, but crime does tend to be higher in and around lower income communities, there's no getting around that.
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Old 11-04-2013, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,759 posts, read 4,951,432 times
Reputation: 1200
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post
This was the stated reasoning for a California 60-unit low-income seniors housing project to be denied last month:

"Opponents said the chosen site...is zoned for single-family homes...low density. Several people who bought homes in that area were very concerned about their investments (which are) based upon the promises of city zoning...it would result in an overconcentration of affordable housing in the area. They also argued that the cluster would increase traffic congestion and lower their home values."

The project was less than a mile from another such project. But the real reason for the denial was the vehemence of the property owners fighting it.
Well, common sense dictates that traffic congestion likely would increase by increasing density and simple economics states that more supply = lower valuation for resales.
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Old 11-04-2013, 03:01 PM
 
1,835 posts, read 3,051,317 times
Reputation: 3786
I am 100% against affordable housing in high income areas. Even if you promised only the best of the best of the tenants would be placed in it. People work their rear end off to be able to afford an area and a complex - it is entirely unfair to reward those who have not earned it with the amenities and luxuries that someone who has worked harder or smarter can not get at the same price. It is anti-capitalism and I would not buy a house next to one of these complexes.

It makes no sense. Put affordable housing among other affordable houses. Get the most bang for your buck. Do not bring the nice areas down to the affordable housing levels. It is never just about money though, cultures, morals, ethics, work habits - these things are very different among various groups with various income levels - mixing them does not produce good results...for every one that you lift up through these programs, you drag 2 or 3 down a little bit. If you do it perpetually, you will eventually even everyone out - but that average will be well below what it is now.
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