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Old 11-24-2013, 10:41 PM
 
1 posts, read 23,570 times
Reputation: 11

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Home inspected was built in 1976.
* Heating unit original to house and shows rust in the burner chamber.
*Condenser is 1988 and coil is 1976.
* No gutter system
* Grading correction needed in backyard
* Missing GFCI protection in bathrooms, kitchen, garage, wet bar, exterior
* Kitchen counter receptacles all have open grounds
*Water Heater is 1976 unit

These are just the major things. Also, how much would all this cost to repair/replace if seller does not cover it?
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:45 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 41,664,880 times
Reputation: 16190
Personally the only things I would ask for are the GFCI and the receptacles. If the other items are in working condition I wouldn't expect anyone to replace them for me. You knew you were buying an older house.


Talk to an expert about estimates.
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Florida -
9,639 posts, read 12,060,314 times
Reputation: 19676
Reasonable for whom? Quite frankly, you are asking the wrong question!

You are at a pivotal point in your home-buying process where it's imperative that you ask yourself a simple question: "How badly do you really want this house? (and perhaps, 'What type of repairs is it going to take for you to be happy with the house and total price?").

This is the last point in the buying process that you can ask for repairs or even bail out if you think it is necessary. You obviously have some concerns. If you 'blink' at this point of the deal, you will lose any leverage you have.

Last edited by jghorton; 11-24-2013 at 11:08 PM..
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Old 11-24-2013, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Rural Central Texas
3,620 posts, read 9,645,610 times
Reputation: 5476
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
* Heating unit original to house and shows rust in the burner chamber.
rust is normal, forget about it
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
*Condenser is 1988 and coil is 1976.
no big deal. You want a new house, buy a new house.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
* No gutter system
You noticed that when you made the offer, right? no a defect, it is a normal condition of many houses
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
* Grading correction needed in backyard
Also visible before you made your offer. Should have taken it into account.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
* Missing GFCI protection in bathrooms, kitchen, garage, wet bar, exterior
At last a non-visible code defect. Ask for it to be repaired don't worry about the cost. It is a requirement of the lender under most circumstances.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
* Kitchen counter receptacles all have open grounds
another code defect that should be remedied for safty.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
*Water Heater is 1976 unit
Normal condition. don't sweat it.

These are just the major things. Also, how much would all this cost to repair/replace if seller does not cover it?[/quote]

If the seller refuses to fix the code violations, call an electrician and ask. It will vary depending on who you ask and their rates, distances and overhead.
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Old 11-24-2013, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Rural Central Texas
3,620 posts, read 9,645,610 times
Reputation: 5476
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
* Heating unit original to house and shows rust in the burner chamber.
rust is normal, forget about it
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
*Condenser is 1988 and coil is 1976.
no big deal. You want a new house, buy a new house.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
* No gutter system
You noticed that when you made the offer, right? no a defect, it is a normal condition of many houses
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
* Grading correction needed in backyard
Also visible before you made your offer. Should have taken it into account.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
* Missing GFCI protection in bathrooms, kitchen, garage, wet bar, exterior
At last a non-visible code defect. Ask for it to be repaired don't worry about the cost. It is a requirement of the lender under most circumstances.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
* Kitchen counter receptacles all have open grounds
another code defect that should be remedied for safty.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
*Water Heater is 1976 unit
Normal condition. don't sweat it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cg70 View Post
These are just the major things. Also, how much would all this cost to repair/replace if seller does not cover it?
If the seller refuses to fix the code violations, call an electrician and ask. It will vary depending on who you ask and their rates, distances and overhead.
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Old 11-25-2013, 03:11 AM
 
4,899 posts, read 3,882,653 times
Reputation: 10461
It's reasonable to ask for hidden, major defects. It's unreasonable to ask for something that was visible or to be expected (older components). The GFCIs will be cheap to install. Most everything else should have been visible when you saw the house the first time or to be expected because of the age. Proceed as contracted if you still like the house or if you're willing to be pissy you might be able to whittle some money out of the seller.
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Old 11-25-2013, 03:48 AM
 
17 posts, read 44,283 times
Reputation: 26
Ask for whatever makes you comfortable, whatever you feel the seller should address and/or whatever is reasonable for your local area. Unless you are an electrician, plumber, or general contractor or do not beat yourself up for not noticing some of those thngs when you viewed the house. Ask yourself if you are willing to purchase the house and bear the cost of addressing those items. If yes, then you do not need to ask seller for repairs. If your answer is no, then you should ask for repairs of the items you are not willing to pay for out of pocket.
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Old 11-25-2013, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Georgia
4,574 posts, read 4,527,327 times
Reputation: 15857
1. This is what happens when you buy an older home. If the owner wasn't going to buy a new HVAC for himself, do you really think they are going to buy YOU one? :-)

2. Were the ages of the systems disclosed on the seller's disclosure? Around here, the seller's disclosure is 5 pages long and includes questions regarding the age of things like the HVAC system, the water heater, etc. If they were on the disclosure, you knew (or should have known) the general age going into your initial negotiations. If not, it's a toss-up.

3. No gutter? Sorry, not a safety issue. And definitely something you should have known before you made your initial offer. Lots of people choose not to have gutters because, to them, it spoils the line of the roof. They are not "required."

4. GFCI outlets in wet areas, around here, cost about $50-$80 each for an electrician to install.

5. At that age, it's only a matter of time before the water heater fails. I had one that lasted almost 30 years -- but when it failed, it was spectacular :-/ Around here, a 40-50 gal. gas water heater, installed by a professional, is about $1200 - $1800.

6. "Grading correction"? What does this mean? The ground slopes toward the house? Is there evidence of water intrusion as a result? If not -- it's certainly something to consider down the road, but not necessarily a deal breaker.

If I were you, and you feel like you got a good deal on the house, then I'd ask for the electrical work, and maybe throw in a request for a new water heater, and leave the rest. Or else ask for a price adjustment based on the cost of fixing the electrical and replacing the water heater, then negotiate from there.
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Old 11-25-2013, 06:22 AM
 
Location: NC
7,587 posts, read 9,572,258 times
Reputation: 15991
In my opinion, you should only ask for a) code violations to be corrected, b) correction of functional issues like a missing knob from the stove, c) correction of defects that make something in the house be not as represented (for example if the heat would not come on). Of course, those items can be negotiated via the price, or can be ignored by the seller.

These are just things it would be fair to ask for, not meaning that you would get them. I have had agents tell me however that one could ask that a room be repainted, carpet replaced, etc. But that would come at the offer stage perhaps rather than after inspection.
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Old 11-25-2013, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
7,498 posts, read 5,944,225 times
Reputation: 25679
The heating system and water heater are not something that I would ask for. It's an old house and those are just things that you should have factored into your offer. At this point, it's really not even something to ask for. I wouldn't want whatever cheap unit they threw in to satisfy you. Were these facts not in the disclosures?
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