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View Poll Results: How many square feet is considered a big house?
1500+ square feet 5 3.40%
2000+ square feet 20 13.61%
3000+ square feet 68 46.26%
4000+ square feet 31 21.09%
5000+ square feet 10 6.80%
6000+ square feet 9 6.12%
The person who set these poll choices doesn't even know what big is! 4 2.72%
Voters: 147. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-28-2014, 12:34 PM
 
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The way I think it is the size of the rooms. At 4,000 square feet the master bedroom might be 300 square feet but you're still looking at some smaller bedrooms that are 10 by 10 which is rather cramped.

For the entire home to feel big to me, every room should be at least 200 sq ft, with the larger rooms, like the family room, on the order of 600 to 800 sq ft each. That's why I said a house like 5,000+ or 6,000+.
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Old 04-28-2014, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Long Island
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We had a 1300sqft starter house that was 3 bed (1 downstairs) and 1 bath and for the 2 of us then it was perfectly fine. Then because of kids we moved to a 1500sqft ranch that was 3/1 also, plus full basement with bath, but we put a 2nd floor on top making it 2730sqft - 4 beds and 2 baths upstairs and all of the downstairs bedrooms converted to an open floor plan plus an office - now it feels big. Upstairs we have extra room in the master bed & bath with vaulted ceilings and 3 good size kids rooms. Of course if you grew up in this kind of house like my kids will, it will just feel normal to them. It's always just what you're used to. I'd say anything over 3000 is wasted space personally. You don't see many even get to be that size on LI with our 100x60 avg lots unless it's a new construction with 17k+ in taxes.

Last edited by ovi8; 04-28-2014 at 01:58 PM..
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Old 04-28-2014, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Saint Paul, MN
1,365 posts, read 1,668,444 times
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I voted for 3,000+ square feet.

I am not attaching any value judgments to house size…big does not have to mean TOO big, and other people’s housing preferences are their own business. But I think it would be hard to argue that 3000 square feet is not empirically a large house. New housing starts have been averaging just under 2200 square feet based on the past few years, and with all the existing housing stock that is much smaller than that, I think it would be safe to say that the average home is (probably well) under 2000 square feet. A house at least half again the national average would fall into the “empirically large” category in my mind.

I say this as someone who grew up in a 6000 square foot home out in the country. It was HUGE, and I don’t think anyone could disagree with that. There were 4 actual bedrooms (although several others fit the definition of a bedroom), a massive sunroom, an art studio, his and hers offices, a sewing room, etc., etc., etc. My house is just a hair under 2500 square feet, and it feels slightly on the large size of average to me. There is space for a guest bedroom, a big office, a huge media/family room, a workshop, and a project room that would eventually be a nursery if life takes me in that direction. I'm not saying that it would be in any way wrong to have or desire more space, but I don't think it is particularly reasonable to claim that such a house would be anything other than large.
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Old 04-28-2014, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Long Island
9,407 posts, read 14,047,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellemint View Post
I've always wondered what the folks who live in 10,000 sq feet homes do when they misplace their glasses or something like that---it's a lot of house to search
their butler is the one who suffers
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Old 04-28-2014, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,246 posts, read 94,065,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikester View Post
We went to some open houses and I think for me over 5,000 or 6,000 square feet starts feeling nice and open. Anything smaller is ample but I still consider it cozy. Am I way off base here?
Your views are not the norm.
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Old 04-28-2014, 02:27 PM
 
392 posts, read 838,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squirl View Post
It is a combination of actual square footage and floorplan. I consider any house under 1200' sq feet a small house, 1200- 1400' sq feet a modest house, 1500-2000 an average sized house; larger than 2000' square feet a nice-sized house, over 5000' sq feet a large house .....
I agree with you.

I also think, it depends on the floor plan and how people use the home. How much privacy / alone time they need (and how often), how much they spend home all together (say if some are working, and have different shifts, and barely bump into each other, and different scenario would be working from home for both parents etc)
We have days when guests and relatives stay to visit, and every square inch of space is used to the fullest. And there are other days when we are pretty much in and out for work / kids activities, and just crash in the evening, get up in the morning for quick breakfast, and whole house seems to stay "unused"...
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Old 04-28-2014, 02:30 PM
 
392 posts, read 838,782 times
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But to answer OPs question, yes I think 5k is definitely a very big house. However, if you can afford a bigger one to feel that you truly have enough space - sure, why not?
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Old 04-28-2014, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Mount Laurel
4,186 posts, read 10,676,426 times
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I put the land space in consideration when determining what's big. Put 3000 sq/ft on less than .25 acres. Small house to me cause you are just cramped into a big box. Look out the window and it's your neighbor.

I like a proportion between house sq/ft and land. When the land is small, 2000sq/ft may be too big.

Just my .02
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Old 04-28-2014, 03:06 PM
 
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It depends on whether you are looking for a place to be alone or looking at your heating bill.
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Old 04-28-2014, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Montana
1,820 posts, read 1,950,600 times
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When I was growing up 1200 sq/ft was a "typical" sized mid-income home, and over 1,500 sq/ft was getting into the category of "large" home.

It seems outside of large cities like LA, NY, Chicago, Philly, Boston, or unique real estate markets like Hawaii, that 2,000-2,500 is the "typical" sized mid-income home anymore, at least that is what is most commonly found in new home developments, and home plan books (completely unscientific, but it's what I see).

I think 3,000 sq/ft is a "large" home, and while everyone is free to make their own decisions, I would have a hard time figuring out what to do with the space for anything over 4,000 sq/ft.
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