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Old 03-30-2021, 05:34 PM
 
634 posts, read 1,164,748 times
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Late 90s and 2000s are by far the worst. OSB sheathed junk built by stooges. Those structures will be lucky to last 50 years.

By far the best are the pre-balloon framed structures up until the civil war.
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Old 03-31-2021, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
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You also have to be careful of additions in the older homes. The original frame might be built well but often the additions are what causes problems.
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Old 05-01-2021, 12:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FalconheadWest View Post
In Dallas, the 2000's are the worst construction. The 80's were built very well. The early 90's have some 80's influence, and the rest of the 90's is ok, but once 2000 hit and the boom was going on, those houses are glued together and much worse construction than earlier.

I see about the same thing in Austin. Construction is getting better as the builders have slowed down.
I disagree. Being in the real estate industry in Dallas, i am constantly disappointed in the poor quality of the late 70’s/80’s “tract” home in the Dallas area (apart from some higher end homes built by more established custom builders). You cannot properly maintain a home that was built with substandard material unless you are ok with eventually rebuilding that house piece by piece. Trim and doors lacking sealant (leading to moisture swell and disintegration), lack of insulation (leading to a leaky home and sky high electric bills), poorly laid slabs, load bearing beams that were not adequate (leading to stress on walls causing sagging and cracks around windows and doors), circuit/breaker boards that would not trip when overloaded (leading to fires) etc.... While I understand that in order to build homes for “the masses” requires cost cutting measures, the “culture” of the decade pushed square footage over quality. We were at the genesis of our “bigger is always better” neurosis and, along with the state and FHA construction standards (MPS/minimum property standards/specifically durability requirements) being incredibly low, the builders had no incentive to exceed those standards when there were crazy profits to be made.
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Old 05-01-2021, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Morrisville, NC
9,144 posts, read 14,753,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrandD View Post
I disagree. Being in the real estate industry in Dallas, i am constantly disappointed in the poor quality of the late 70’s/80’s “tract” home in the Dallas area (apart from some higher end homes built by more established custom builders). You cannot properly maintain a home that was built with substandard material unless you are ok with eventually rebuilding that house piece by piece. Trim and doors lacking sealant (leading to moisture swell and disintegration), lack of insulation (leading to a leaky home and sky high electric bills), poorly laid slabs, load bearing beams that were not adequate (leading to stress on walls causing sagging and cracks around windows and doors), circuit/breaker boards that would not trip when overloaded (leading to fires) etc.... While I understand that in order to build homes for “the masses” requires cost cutting measures, the “culture” of the decade pushed square footage over quality. We were at the genesis of our “bigger is always better” neurosis and, along with the state and FHA construction standards (MPS/minimum property standards/specifically durability requirements) being incredibly low, the builders had no incentive to exceed those standards when there were crazy profits to be made.
Agree. The 80s had polyethylene, masonite siding, and a lack of understanding of building science by most of the industry. Couple this with the fact that in many metros, the 80s was the first really big wave of expansion and building and the municipal inspection departments could not keep up. Bad things are lurking in lots of houses that take real money to fix.
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Old 05-03-2021, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Morrisville, NC
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oops, autocorrect fail. Meant to say polybutylene.
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Old 05-03-2021, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
43,266 posts, read 77,043,330 times
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I owned a 1940 house.
Regrettable money pit.

We have had poor execution of construction of all types for all of history, leading to junk. I just happened to buy one.
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Old 05-03-2021, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
13,707 posts, read 12,413,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinE View Post
Late 90s and 2000s are by far the worst. OSB sheathed junk built by stooges. Those structures will be lucky to last 50 years.

By far the best are the pre-balloon framed structures up until the civil war.
OSB is stronger than sheathing the house in Oak. And while not a scientific experiment, two scraps that are sitting beside my shed, one of plywood and one of OSB, the Ply is delaminating, the OSB is not.

And you do realize that the net effect of taking a single 10x10 beam, as opposed to the same board feet in 2x4's, you'd probably have the same structural strength? You can frame a 16 foot wall, one way or another.

The craftsmanship and skill required to execute that from a mortise-tenon perspective doesn't mean that the structure is stronger.
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Old 05-03-2021, 09:27 AM
 
12,022 posts, read 11,562,088 times
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Stucco was the rage in the 1920's. Groucho endorses Stucco.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPTqrFas9Bo
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Old 05-03-2021, 08:02 PM
 
1,471 posts, read 1,414,990 times
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Early 21st century... most pitiful I have seen. The 60s were better than the 70s and 80s. The late 40s have a poor reputation...there was huge demand and easy loans post WWII.
The 90s were good.. if you are talking 1890s...
I am moving into my 1936 house on Saturday.. wish me luck.
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Old 05-04-2021, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Needham, MA
8,547 posts, read 14,012,666 times
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Around here, I would say the worst quality houses are those built in the 80's. Second worst is probably the 90's and then the 70's after that. Recent construction seems to be pretty solid and pre-70's construction is typically pretty solid and we have may homes dating back to the 1600's and 1700's. The antique houses like that usually have been "updated" in important ways like houses that were supported by tree trunks sitting on dirt floors have been upgraded to modern lally columns sitting on cement footings. Once you do things like that these houses are usually pretty solid.
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