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Old 06-25-2020, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
4,157 posts, read 2,277,724 times
Reputation: 11217

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You've got bigger problems than just the inspection.


https://www.city-data.com/forum/real...l#post58474335


Why you started two threads on the same topic is beyond me.
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Old 06-25-2020, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Knoxville
4,622 posts, read 23,322,495 times
Reputation: 5785
Quote:
Originally Posted by selling home View Post
We are in the process of selling our home and a few weeks ago the home inspector came by and within a few days came up with a long list of problems with the house.

I was shocked by the long list because I was proud of the fact that we spent so much time and money maintaining our home during the last five years. I thought the house was in nearly perfect shape. The home inspector hired by the new buyer disagreed.

Our real estate agent told me it is all part of a silly game buyers and inspectors use to get money from the seller towards closing costs. It is easier to try to pay them off with a lump sum than hire contractors to try to fix the defects and then be concerned things were not fixed to everyone's standards.

If you sold a house recently, what did you do about the list of things on the home inspector report? Did you fix everything or pay money to the buyer to waive inspection? Tell us how you came up with your decision about what to do.
Sounds like the inspector did his job! For 30 years I played that silly game you call it as an inspector. Not once did I conspire with buyers or Realtors to create a list for them to use as an advantage or game. In fact, when one of my clients asked me to include some things in the report so they could extort more money, I refused. When she insisted that "she was paying me and I would do what she said", I stopped the inspection and told her to find someone else.

You are a very common home owner thinking their house is perfect, and when something is pointed out as a problem, they usually respond with something like "its always been like that, and its not a problem". Improper and unsafe electrical is usually explained by "well its never been a problem for me".

As others have said, wait for the buyers to give you a list, and then you can say yes or no as to what you are willing to do. Then they can decide if they want to buy your house. Its a negotiation. Home inspectors couldn't give a flip whether they client buys the house, or if you sell it. They are interested in giving the most accurate assessment of the condition of the property. They are paid regardless if they find 300 things, or nothing. In reality, finding more stuff, makes more work for us. It would be much easier to find nothing. However, there is that liability issue where people are so willing to sue you for any little thing that might have been missed. THATS why inspectors make such long lists. WE DO NOT WANT TO BE SUED.
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Old 06-25-2020, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
49,986 posts, read 51,987,161 times
Reputation: 98359
1) Don't take it personally.
2) Remember that you're selling a used home.
3) Let the seller tell you what things they think should be fixed.
4) Negotiate those items.

What is on the "long list" of HOA violations from your other thread? Had you received warnings about those violations previous to listing your house?
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Old 06-25-2020, 09:57 AM
 
13,222 posts, read 15,015,941 times
Reputation: 17775
I sold about 5 years ago.

The inspector found some trivial things. (cracked outlet plate, loose railing, etc) Fixed a few minor things myself, but basically said "take it or leave it" on the other items. They took it.
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Old 06-25-2020, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Berkeley Neighborhood, Denver, CO USA
16,326 posts, read 25,029,781 times
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Rule #1 is to always leave at least 6 easy-to-find needs fixing items for the inspector.
The inspector has to find some things wrong.
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Old 06-25-2020, 10:15 AM
 
5,375 posts, read 2,350,788 times
Reputation: 12436
We took $1500 off the price of a $385,000 house. We didn't fix anything. The complaints were trivial. Once we agreed on the new price we refused to allow a re-inspection by anyone other than the buyer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by selling home View Post
We are in the process of selling our home and a few weeks ago the home inspector came by and within a few days came up with a long list of problems with the house.

I was shocked by the long list because I was proud of the fact that we spent so much time and money maintaining our home during the last five years. I thought the house was in nearly perfect shape. The home inspector hired by the new buyer disagreed.

Our real estate agent told me it is all part of a silly game buyers and inspectors use to get money from the seller towards closing costs. It is easier to try to pay them off with a lump sum than hire contractors to try to fix the defects and then be concerned things were not fixed to everyone's standards.

If you sold a house recently, what did you do about the list of things on the home inspector report? Did you fix everything or pay money to the buyer to waive inspection? Tell us how you came up with your decision about what to do.
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Old 06-25-2020, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
10,166 posts, read 19,881,305 times
Reputation: 8855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamaman1 View Post
My issue is that most real estate agents and buyers don't understand the importance of some items that are on the list of deficiencies. Buyers and sellers have to communicate thru their agent who talks to the other agent. There's a lot of miscommunication in the industry.....
To be fair, it's not always the agent. It's usually the buyer deciding what matters to them. However, I agree, too often the buyer gets bad advice from the agent.
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Old 06-25-2020, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
10,166 posts, read 19,881,305 times
Reputation: 8855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Okey Dokie View Post
One thing that the inspector wrote up when we sold our last house were things that were “not to code” although they WERE code when the house was built 10 years previous. Example: there was a HVAC vent in the garage which now would require a “fire damper.” These sort of requests we told the buyer we would not consider. We fixed a few others, and gave them some money (about $750.00 IIRC) on some others.
Our home inspections rarely(like pretty much never) quote codes. They aren't code inspectors. For example, GFCI's are grandfathered in based on when codes changed. However, inspectors don't write them up for being code/not code. If the home doesn't have GFCI outlets, it's simply written up as a safety concern.
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Old 06-25-2020, 10:26 AM
 
14,385 posts, read 8,022,101 times
Reputation: 14013
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Rule #1 is to always leave at least 6 easy-to-find needs fixing items for the inspector.
The inspector has to find some things wrong.
When I sold one home a number of years ago I made sure there were a few easy things left and chatted up the inspector when he was looking at areas that I really didn't want him to look at too closely.
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Old 06-25-2020, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
42,928 posts, read 53,462,384 times
Reputation: 75484
We had a home inspection before we put our house in the market, thinking that it would be easier when we sold to have nothing to apologize for, and to speed up the process. It turned out to be a huge waste of money (and it also forces you to disclose things you otherwise wouldn’t have known about), because our eventual buyers came up with about 50 nit picky items anyway.

Next time, I’ll take more of a take it or leave it attitude.
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