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Old 06-25-2020, 11:35 AM
 
Location: City Data Land
17,081 posts, read 11,045,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
I sold a home a couple of years ago via a relocation company, and the inspection and associated fixes were literally trivial - the home was only 3 years old.

Things like a piece of insulation in the attic was turned over. Hired a company for $50 cash to come, flip it back, document it in an invoice and give me a copy.

Some sunken pavers. A screw missing on a pool heater.

An inspector will always find SOMETHING. It’s their job.

But for most homes it will be more substantial. Some critical, some just picky.
Correct. A home inspector's job is to nitpick a house to death. If they don't do that, they are a bad inspector. My wife is a home inspector and some RE agents don't like her because she's so observant and picky their home deals fall through when they use her. They will use her with clients who are buying, but not for their clients who are selling
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Old 06-25-2020, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
43,171 posts, read 53,817,577 times
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Here, we were told that inspectors are on a rotation, so an agent must use the next in line, instead of just a favorite.
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Old 06-25-2020, 03:01 PM
 
14,386 posts, read 8,168,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
Correct. A home inspector's job is to nitpick a house to death. If they don't do that, they are a bad inspector. My wife is a home inspector and some RE agents don't like her because she's so observant and picky their home deals fall through when they use her. They will use her with clients who are buying, but not for their clients who are selling
When I bought my current home I used an inspector, and naturally he found some things (roof was old, HVAC was old). As he put it, "end of life - replace". That's the obvious answer. As it turns out, I did decide to replace the roof as there was a minor leak (and it was going on 20 years old). And I am replacing one of the AC units shortly, and budgeting for the others over time. There have been a few other small things over the past 21 months I've been in the house, but they're all standard homeowner things.

But I asked him a simple question which was telling, if you get the right kind of inspector.

"Would you buy this house?"

He said "there's nothing here that would stop me".

That was just as important as the full report in my view.
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Old 06-25-2020, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Rural Wisconsin
13,878 posts, read 4,655,289 times
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Our house was built in 1988, we bought it eight years ago, and spent about $50,000 since then in repairs and remodeling. We knew that it was not perfect when we put it up for sale on June 5th this year, but we were confident that it was in decent shape except for the carpet and back yard. We priced the house 15K below what our agent suggested ($25k below market value according to comps and online appraisals), and we had four offers within 48 hours of listing -- two at list price and two over list price.

We were confident that the buyers would be getting at least some "instant equity", but we were shocked to see the inspection report which had a long list of things that were wrong. However, the buyer only insisted on having the roof replaced (which our insurance paid for after a $1,500 deductible) and four other very minor objections totaling just $350.00, so we paid a total of $1,850 that we weren't expecting to pay, but we paid because we wanted to sell quickly. I think the reason the buyer did not list more "things to do" was because she was just as anxious to buy, and decent houses in our area in our price range are very few.
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Old 06-25-2020, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
10,081 posts, read 6,877,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Here, we were told that inspectors are on a rotation, so an agent must use the next in line, instead of just a favorite.



That may be some agent's policy, but it can't be a rule.
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Old 06-25-2020, 06:49 PM
 
5,915 posts, read 5,548,602 times
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Right now, in many areas, it is TOTALLY a seller's market, with multiple offers first day on the market, and houses going for as much as 10% over asking. So, if someone gave me an offer like that, in that market, and then submitted a long list from the inspector, I'd tell them that I wasn't paying for a single thing, that they could take it or leave it, and they've got 24 hrs to decide. They're probably gonna take it. If they don't, I'd tell the realtor to start showing it aggressively, and contact the others who had made offers.
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Old 06-25-2020, 06:51 PM
 
Location: on the wind
15,498 posts, read 9,083,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by selling home View Post
We are in the process of selling our home and a few weeks ago the home inspector came by and within a few days came up with a long list of problems with the house.

I was shocked by the long list because I was proud of the fact that we spent so much time and money maintaining our home during the last five years. I thought the house was in nearly perfect shape. The home inspector hired by the new buyer disagreed.

Our real estate agent told me it is all part of a silly game buyers and inspectors use to get money from the seller towards closing costs. It is easier to try to pay them off with a lump sum than hire contractors to try to fix the defects and then be concerned things were not fixed to everyone's standards.

If you sold a house recently, what did you do about the list of things on the home inspector report? Did you fix everything or pay money to the buyer to waive inspection? Tell us how you came up with your decision about what to do.
Is this the same house for which your HOA sent a list of covenant violations?
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Old 06-25-2020, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Kansas City North
5,457 posts, read 9,167,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
Our home inspections rarely(like pretty much never) quote codes. They aren't code inspectors. For example, GFCI's are grandfathered in based on when codes changed. However, inspectors don't write them up for being code/not code. If the home doesn't have GFCI outlets, it's simply written up as a safety concern.
To be honest, the inspector probably did not actually use the term “not to code” but the implication was because it was current code it should be done. Our response was what they were asking for was like asking for anti lock brakes be installed on a 1980 vehicle.

Our realtor was very good, talked Mr. Dokie back off the ledge after we got their original repair requests and I felt we didn’t get screwed.
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Old 06-25-2020, 07:56 PM
 
479 posts, read 187,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Here, we were told that inspectors are on a rotation, so an agent must use the next in line, instead of just a favorite.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
That may be some agent's policy, but it can't be a rule.

Yeah I'm not sure I understand this if talking about regular home inspector hired for the benefit of the buyer. Maybe talking about places requiring code inspections by city/county/etc as part of the sale? In that case I can see the inspector being assigned rather than chosen.
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Old 06-27-2020, 12:03 PM
 
4,593 posts, read 1,573,089 times
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As mentioned earlier I'd go with a seller's credit. One can loose valuable time and out of pocket money trying to correct themselves. If you have a sale and the credit isn't too much I'd take it. Time is money.


Also once the repair door is open you might never get it closed meaning the contractors could find more issues or only do things a certain way to comply with code or just make the fix easier. The older the house the greater chance a project could expand.



You don't want to get leveraged or taken advantage of but you have a sale with no money out of your bank, the goal is to put money into it. Sellers credit.
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