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Old 02-05-2021, 08:47 AM
 
5,779 posts, read 5,040,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ExNooYawk2 View Post
Like many people, we've been spending a lot of our Quarantine time watching tv in general, Netflix and Amazon Prime in particular. One of the more delightful programs we're watching is Night Stalker, about the creep in Los Angeles back in the '80s.

The film showing him opening ground-floor windows and sneaking inside the house made me wonder about where it's safe for a single woman to live. Attacks happen with other family members present, too, but too many of us ladies are vulnerable.

Are you better off in a high-rise apartment or townhouse? A townhouse community? A gated community?

I like to worry about things. Any thoughts?
An alarm dog. Doesn't have to be a terrifying dog. Any dog can be shot or poisoned. What you want is a deterrent. Stealth entry is deterred by the presence of a barking dog, who wakes up the resident. Can be a sweet little lap dog, as long as they're really yappy when someone is outside the house. When interviewed, criminals who enter by stealth to do harm to a person, say that they just chose a woman who didn't have a dog.
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Old 02-05-2021, 09:07 AM
 
9,897 posts, read 4,827,702 times
Reputation: 27531
Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
An alarm dog. Doesn't have to be a terrifying dog. Any dog can be shot or poisoned. What you want is a deterrent. Stealth entry is deterred by the presence of a barking dog, who wakes up the resident. Can be a sweet little lap dog, as long as they're really yappy when someone is outside the house. When interviewed, criminals who enter by stealth to do harm to a person, say that they just chose a woman who didn't have a dog.
In fact there is an argument to be made that a small dog is a better choice.

Anyone who is prepared to break into a house with a large aggressive dog, is prepared to kill the dog. Someone who breaks into a house with a small dog is likely to just kick the dog to make it go away.

Do you really want your dog to lose her life over a TV?
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Old 02-05-2021, 10:28 AM
 
1,309 posts, read 612,203 times
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This should help.

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Old 02-05-2021, 10:39 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
2,241 posts, read 1,059,108 times
Reputation: 3602
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExNooYawk2 View Post
Like many people, we've been spending a lot of our Quarantine time watching tv in general, Netflix and Amazon Prime in particular. One of the more delightful programs we're watching is Night Stalker, about the creep in Los Angeles back in the '80s.

The film showing him opening ground-floor windows and sneaking inside the house made me wonder about where it's safe for a single woman to live. Attacks happen with other family members present, too, but too many of us ladies are vulnerable.

Are you better off in a high-rise apartment or townhouse? A townhouse community? A gated community?

I like to worry about things. Any thoughts?
I would say Richard Ramirez was more than a “creep”?

The safest housing for anyone is a place that has an attached garage.

After that you use common sense when in your home. You don’t answer the door unless you’re expecting company, or recognize a neighbor. You keep windows open, but have locks on that prevent them from being open too wide. Timers on lights can now be set to random times everyday. Motion sensor lights around the house are just great to have in general, and a security system is nice, but the signs and window stickers work too.

And of course a dog. My neighborhood is far from rough, but there’s an element not too far away. Anyone that would ever case our street during the day would just move on as everyone has a dog. It can be annoying when the mailman comes around as you hear a wave of barks, but when I check the crime map in the paper every week my neighborhood is free of any crime.
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Old 02-05-2021, 11:09 AM
 
15,823 posts, read 28,157,967 times
Reputation: 27207
Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
An alarm dog. Doesn't have to be a terrifying dog. Any dog can be shot or poisoned. What you want is a deterrent. Stealth entry is deterred by the presence of a barking dog, who wakes up the resident. Can be a sweet little lap dog, as long as they're really yappy when someone is outside the house. When interviewed, criminals who enter by stealth to do harm to a person, say that they just chose a woman who didn't have a dog.

I saw a professional burglar interviewed on "Oprah" once. They showed video of different houses and he said how he'd get in. When asked about the one thing that would stop him most times, he said, "A barking dog." He said he didn't have to fear being bitten or attacked, just that noise would point him out and he'd rather go onto another target home.
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Old 02-05-2021, 12:06 PM
 
30 posts, read 43,804 times
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Having lived as a single-woman for many years back in the day (and having had a number of friends who had people crawling into their homes), here are a few things I'd consider (and did use). Your goals are to make your home safe to enter when you come/go and to make your home a hard target that increases the risk of being spotted because of noise and/or length of time to enter your property. Deny access and secrecy.

Best is having a direct door to your home (whether it's a condo/apartment/townhouse/single-family-home). Better is having an extra layer with a lockable screen door. The entry should be well lit and not allow anyone to hide behind. Once inside great devices to have include alarms that you can apply to the door that you activate once you're in (these can slide into the space between the door and frame - they can be used on windows and other doors throughout your home) and there are wedges that are also work well (and both of these devices are excellent when you travel).

You should look at any home you're in (whether you're single or not) and if you can identify a way into your house if you lock yourself out that's an area to pay attention to. This includes doors/windows on the first floor but also the second and upper floors. Are there low roofs that someone can climb onto using a garbage can? Are there overhanging trees, etc.?

Be sure to use a properly sized piece of wood/iron etc. to place in the track of any sliding glass doors. I personally don't like these types of doors or French Doors as the locks are garbage. Pay attention to them and create barriers to prevent them from becoming an entry point.

Utilize wireless alarm systems. These are great if you rent because you can move them with you. Blink, Arlo, Home8, etc. are all good options and reasonably priced. Invest in cameras to target your weakest areas.

Know who has a key to your home if you rent. It's why I especially used my own entry and screen door plus alarm set up in rentals. Who knows how many keys were made and are retained by previous tenants? Ideally you can pay the cost for your landlord to have the door rekeyed. Money well spent. Always rekey a new home you've purchased on the very first day you move in.

Don't expect that a window A/C unit is too large to move out of a window even on a second/upper floor. It's not. I've known of several friends who had someone enter their home on the second floor by removing A/C units. Ditto with thinking an upper floor apartment with a balcony can't be accessed via the balcony.

Always lock your doors and windows, even on upper floors. Always keep the door from your garage to your house locked. This latter one is an easy way for someone to enter your home.

A dog of any size is always a deterrent because of the noise and so too is the earlier poster's recommendation of involved neighbors.

I personally avoided laundry and storage areas in lonely basements and I refused to rent anything on the ground floor or with a common entry for multiple units (high rise or not). And it doesn't matter whether you're single or not. Security lasts well beyond your single years.

Good luck and stay safe.
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Old 02-05-2021, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
11,730 posts, read 9,969,554 times
Reputation: 17238
When I lived in apartment buildings in cities, I preferred the 3rd or 4th floors. Not easy to break into like 1st and 2nd story. If elevator not working not to many flights of stairs to go down in an emergency. Fire truck rescue ladders could reach you. Probably could jump into a fired dept. safety net.

When I moved to single family homes in the burbs one of my requirements is a safe neighborhood.
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Old 02-05-2021, 02:08 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
2,241 posts, read 1,059,108 times
Reputation: 3602
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettingoutofpa View Post
Having lived as a single-woman for many years back in the day (and having had a number of friends who had people crawling into their homes), here are a few things I'd consider (and did use). Your goals are to make your home safe to enter when you come/go and to make your home a hard target that increases the risk of being spotted because of noise and/or length of time to enter your property. Deny access and secrecy.

Best is having a direct door to your home (whether it's a condo/apartment/townhouse/single-family-home). Better is having an extra layer with a lockable screen door. The entry should be well lit and not allow anyone to hide behind. Once inside great devices to have include alarms that you can apply to the door that you activate once you're in (these can slide into the space between the door and frame - they can be used on windows and other doors throughout your home) and there are wedges that are also work well (and both of these devices are excellent when you travel).

You should look at any home you're in (whether you're single or not) and if you can identify a way into your house if you lock yourself out that's an area to pay attention to. This includes doors/windows on the first floor but also the second and upper floors. Are there low roofs that someone can climb onto using a garbage can? Are there overhanging trees, etc.?

Be sure to use a properly sized piece of wood/iron etc. to place in the track of any sliding glass doors. I personally don't like these types of doors or French Doors as the locks are garbage. Pay attention to them and create barriers to prevent them from becoming an entry point.

Utilize wireless alarm systems. These are great if you rent because you can move them with you. Blink, Arlo, Home8, etc. are all good options and reasonably priced. Invest in cameras to target your weakest areas.

Know who has a key to your home if you rent. It's why I especially used my own entry and screen door plus alarm set up in rentals. Who knows how many keys were made and are retained by previous tenants? Ideally you can pay the cost for your landlord to have the door rekeyed. Money well spent. Always rekey a new home you've purchased on the very first day you move in.

Don't expect that a window A/C unit is too large to move out of a window even on a second/upper floor. It's not. I've known of several friends who had someone enter their home on the second floor by removing A/C units. Ditto with thinking an upper floor apartment with a balcony can't be accessed via the balcony.

Always lock your doors and windows, even on upper floors. Always keep the door from your garage to your house locked. This latter one is an easy way for someone to enter your home.

A dog of any size is always a deterrent because of the noise and so too is the earlier poster's recommendation of involved neighbors.

I personally avoided laundry and storage areas in lonely basements and I refused to rent anything on the ground floor or with a common entry for multiple units (high rise or not). And it doesn't matter whether you're single or not. Security lasts well beyond your single years.

Good luck and stay safe.
My god, where were you living where you had multiple friends that had people invade their homes? That sounds absolutely terrifying?

Also locking your door from your house to garage is a solid suggestion, but if that’s your concern you can easily put a lock (or a stick even) through a hole on the track near a bottom wheel once you’ve arrived. Whether they have a device to read codes, or manually try to force it up, it won’t budge. If it’s an old school door on hinges a slide bolt on the inside of the door and frame will accomplish the same. I did this when we went on vacation once for two weeks, but don’t bother anymore. Don’t ever leave a garage door opener in your car if you park in the driveway or street. Even if it’s not on the visor, thieves will look for these when ransacking a car.
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Old 02-05-2021, 06:09 PM
 
2,688 posts, read 903,887 times
Reputation: 7733
Quote:
Originally Posted by Formerly Known As Twenty View Post
In my experience, living in a neighborhood with at least one "Pittsburgh Alarm System" have been the safest ones for when I've been living solo. Even when I lived in some sketchy parts of town, I never felt unsafe in my own home.

**A Pittsburgh Alarm System is living in a intergenerational neighborhood with longtime residents who tend to keep an eye out for each other---particularly a neighborhood with a retired older person who is aware of everyone's comings and goings and what's normal for each resident. Bonus points if said neighbors listen to a police scanner.
To build on this concept, a "retirement community" would offer similar benefits, with lots of people who are at home all day, consider it a plus to keep an eye on their neighbors, largely are devoid of young people, etc..

Speaking of "young people", think of who is most-represented in crime statistics, the "young" and "male" represent the majority of people who commit crime. Then start sprinkling in other factors like poverty, drugs, racial components, etc., and you don't have to wonder why cops tend to "profile" people, they aren't much different than fishermen who choose to go to the lakes with the most fish - except it isn't fair for people who are swept up in the profiling who don't commit crimes, LOL, which is why profiling is looked down upon.

To me, extremely-resistant-to-entry doors and windows are key to keeping one safe, in addition to alarms and yappy dogs. If someone cannot enter without a two-man battering ram and two minutes time, it allows one time to clear the mind, retrieve the shotgun, assume a defensive position, and dial 911. But even these steps are not as good as living in an area with few criminals, because you need to be able to retrieve your mail, enter your car, tend to one's lawn, etc., and the best doors in the world won't help you in those situations. Nor is it realistic to assume everyone can or wants to become adept with concealed carry, although at the end of the day, you are ultimately responsible for your own safety. As they say, when seconds count, the police are minutes away.

I quit answering my door long ago, anyone I know has my phone number and will call before coming over. Anyone knocking on my door (or even ringing my phone, for that matter) is doing so for THEIR benefit, not mine, and if I were looking to purchase something, certainly wouldn't be doing it from a door-to-door salesman, RING doorbells or equivalent are worth their weight in gold for allowing you to screen people without having to open your door.
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Old 02-05-2021, 06:25 PM
 
1,500 posts, read 1,325,931 times
Reputation: 2430
Quote:
Originally Posted by kab0906 View Post
Personally I don't like living in a building with lots of other people. Apartments, condos, etc. They're all strangers, basically, and rotate in and out.

Townhomes can be ok. You usually get more settled people in townhomes.

But a single family home seems safest, so long as you're in a good area to begin with.

Plus, get a dog. A barky one.
Agreed, and a Glock

Seriously, I like modern high rises. They have 24-hr concierges and one would need a key fob to access the elevator. I always opt for the highest floor. Mainly for views, but I also feel safer. I rented a basement apartment once. And, while the neighborhood was safe, I was freaked out that someone could have easily kicked in the french doors. There was a security alarm, but that didn't bring about any relief. I moved after 3 mos of living there.

Other than that, I prefer gated townhouse communities with 24 hr. security.
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