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Old 05-01-2021, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
4,546 posts, read 10,527,302 times
Reputation: 9523

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Ultimately, few of us have the broadness of mind to overcome the confines of our own personal experience.

My own experience as a long-term homeowner was an unmitigated disaster... personally and financially. In the darkest days, when some overwhelming disaster would occur in the house, such as leaks through the roof and into the basement so severe as if a phantom faucet jutting insolently through the wall was as it were opened wide, the denial was so intense, that I'd decamp to the office, and sleep there, too fearful and dejected for days to even return "home". The eventual sale of the house wasn't merely a relief; it felt like a rescue, a helicopter dropping a rope to my beleaguered splintering raft.

Who cares, how many times a haughty landlord drops on me a sudden eviction notice? I'd rather have my possessions ignominiously scattered curbside, the butt of public mockery, than to endure the gnawing, relentless cancer of a house collapsing in price and structure - despite the supposed security of having it paid off.
I can relate to this. I think it was coming home to a geyser in my yard that did me in. I did everything you're supposed to do. I had the inspection before I bought, did routine maintenance, had an emergency fund (that was depleted real fast) and completely underestimated how expensive and time consuming it is to sell.

I do not know if I will buy again. Never say never. However, I'm thoroughly enjoying a break from ownership.
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Old 05-02-2021, 10:11 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
21,645 posts, read 22,807,480 times
Reputation: 18069
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
My own experience as a long-term homeowner was an unmitigated disaster... personally and financially. In the darkest days, when some overwhelming disaster would occur in the house, such as leaks through the roof and into the basement so severe as if a phantom faucet jutting insolently through the wall was as it were opened wide, the denial was so intense, that I'd decamp to the office, and sleep there, too fearful and dejected for days to even return "home". The eventual sale of the house wasn't merely a relief; it felt like a rescue, a helicopter dropping a rope to my beleaguered splintering raft.
What caused your roof to leak?

Usually, that is the result of a problem that has been festering for a long time.
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Old 05-02-2021, 11:15 AM
 
Location: moved
10,865 posts, read 6,675,318 times
Reputation: 18269
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
What caused your roof to leak?

Usually, that is the result of a problem that has been festering for a long time.
The house was improperly built in the first place. It was a custom-construction by the owner himself, from the sturdy pioneer days, before rigorous code-enforcement and the sort of government meddling that I myself am only too quick to decry.

The place was, first, improperly cited with respect to local soil condition and topography. Second, the foundation was unsound. Third, the drainage was inadequate or outright absent. And fourth, it was a "hip roof" improperly framed with respect to the chimney... which was had incorrect masonry. Thus the leaks intruded from both above and below, merging into a basement that came to resemble a scene from a prison-escape movie in sewer tunnel.

The prestige of age, and naïve adoration for the custom and the self-generated, blinded both me and the house-inspector. We were seduced by the idyllic image of the prairie-hut, softly puffing smoke in snowbound frontier-winter. In hindsight it would have been better to go with a Ryan Homes generic match-stick box, finished in Chinese drywall and roofed by folks of you-know-what immigration status.
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Old 05-02-2021, 02:55 PM
 
10,850 posts, read 6,821,410 times
Reputation: 28742
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
The house was improperly built in the first place. It was a custom-construction by the owner himself, from the sturdy pioneer days, before rigorous code-enforcement and the sort of government meddling that I myself am only too quick to decry.

The place was, first, improperly cited with respect to local soil condition and topography. Second, the foundation was unsound. Third, the drainage was inadequate or outright absent. And fourth, it was a "hip roof" improperly framed with respect to the chimney... which was had incorrect masonry. Thus the leaks intruded from both above and below, merging into a basement that came to resemble a scene from a prison-escape movie in sewer tunnel.

The prestige of age, and naïve adoration for the custom and the self-generated, blinded both me and the house-inspector. We were seduced by the idyllic image of the prairie-hut, softly puffing smoke in snowbound frontier-winter. In hindsight it would have been better to go with a Ryan Homes generic match-stick box, finished in Chinese drywall and roofed by folks of you-know-what immigration status.
This is the longest possible way of saying "I bought a poorly built old wreck because it looked quaint."

But it's sad that the experience completely soured you on home ownership. I'd have a word or two to say to the home inspector who cleared it, too. It's one thing for the average person to overlook issues, completely another for a profession to fail to notice them.

Last edited by saibot; 05-02-2021 at 03:41 PM..
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Old 05-02-2021, 04:49 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
2,479 posts, read 1,229,256 times
Reputation: 4169
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
The house was improperly built in the first place. It was a custom-construction by the owner himself, from the sturdy pioneer days, before rigorous code-enforcement and the sort of government meddling that I myself am only too quick to decry.

The place was, first, improperly cited with respect to local soil condition and topography. Second, the foundation was unsound. Third, the drainage was inadequate or outright absent. And fourth, it was a "hip roof" improperly framed with respect to the chimney... which was had incorrect masonry. Thus the leaks intruded from both above and below, merging into a basement that came to resemble a scene from a prison-escape movie in sewer tunnel.

The prestige of age, and naïve adoration for the custom and the self-generated, blinded both me and the house-inspector. We were seduced by the idyllic image of the prairie-hut, softly puffing smoke in snowbound frontier-winter. In hindsight it would have been better to go with a Ryan Homes generic match-stick box, finished in Chinese drywall and roofed by folks of you-know-what immigration status.
I would love to see a copy of that inspection report as I have a hard time believing they’d overlook so many problems? If things were out of their scope of expertise (considering the age of the house) I’m sure there were recommendations to have them checked by a specialist.

Home inspectors have seen it all and have a job to do. There’s zero reason for them to be, as you say, “blinded and seduced” by a house’s age, setting, or anything else, and just sign off on a lemon?

I have a feeling you only heard/read what you wanted to after falling in love with the house. It happens all the time.
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Old 05-08-2021, 10:00 PM
 
76 posts, read 55,718 times
Reputation: 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by bande1102 View Post
I can relate to this. I think it was coming home to a geyser in my yard that did me in. I did everything you're supposed to do. I had the inspection before I bought, did routine maintenance, had an emergency fund (that was depleted real fast) and completely underestimated how expensive and time consuming it is to sell.
.
How long did you own that house?
Can you list the major expenses you incurred?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
The place was, first, improperly cited with respect to local soil condition and topography. Second, the foundation was unsound. Third, the drainage was inadequate or outright absent. And fourth, it was a "hip roof" improperly framed with respect to the chimney... which was had incorrect masonry. Thus the leaks intruded from both above and below, merging into a basement that came to resemble a scene from a prison-escape movie in sewer tunnel.
.
How long did you own that house?
Can you list the major expenses you incurred?
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Old 05-09-2021, 02:58 AM
 
88,844 posts, read 86,475,658 times
Reputation: 64032
A home can also be death by a thousand cuts , not just major stuff , but endless costs that always seem to covid up…everything from buying a snow blower to gardening stuff to paint …

Most homeowners do not keep good records or even account for the fact that mortgage interest alone can cost you 2 to 3x what you paid for the house since most homeowners can’t itemize.

All our homes we owned cost a lot of money …early on we couldn’t go anywhere with out my wife buying something for the lawn or house …

We had costs cropping up every where ….but because they are all very low they just go under the radar.

We had to get the gutters and leaders cleaned even with screens 2x a year because we were in a wooded area , we had a plow guy , a Gardner , the harsh winters required frequent re stringing of the deck , we had a bug guy 2x a year .

A tree limb fell and knocked our electric service off the house …we had to have a bee guy come and remove a big nest we found …

The list of things went on and on or else every time we went to the house all I had was chores to do , it sucked .

So all these expenses really added up and eventually I had enough and sold the house .

Our other house we owned cost 169k in 1987 ..we renovated it in 2000 and it cost us 100k …

We had some heavy major repairs like when the water pipe broke where it enters the house under the concrete porch …that was thousands …we needed a new roof over our ownership .

The water heater and furnace were eventually replaced …..

Quite a few plumbing issues yearly as tree roots grew in to the sewer pipe and had to have the sewer guy cut them .

I can’t even remember most of the expenses associated with our homes .


The best deals we had were co-ops where we had nothing extra to pay outside of monthly charges

Last edited by mathjak107; 05-09-2021 at 04:03 AM..
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Old 05-09-2021, 06:43 AM
 
8,569 posts, read 4,144,081 times
Reputation: 25954
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFOtoMEM View Post
I am temporarily relocating for work, and planning to use this as an excuse to sell my house in CA. I have reached the realization that I just have zero desire to be a homeowner. I have spent SO much money and time on this house, but it's never good enough; I always see something else that could be improved, updated, or fixed. I dislike dealing with contractors and repair people. I love the idea of not being invested in a property and just calling the apartment office if something needs to be fixed.

Has anyone else reached the same realization, and what were your reasons? How do you explain this to your family? I am expecting some pushback from my parents for renting when I can technically afford to own a home, but just don't want the hassle.

We moved from a 3500 sf house on 0.75 acres in a very nice suburb into a 1400 sf condo close to downtown. It's not renting, but its virtually the same thing since the only maintenance we've performed on the interior has been changing a lightbulb. Yet our combined mortgage/HOA fees are considerably less than what we'd pay for a nicer apartment.

Yes, houses are money pits. Even more importantly, they are time sucks.

We're in our late 50s. My wife and I have interests that do not entail shoving a lawnmower up and down the yard or endlessly maintaining a house.

At the same time, a condo is more of a community than an apartment, chiefly because the fellow residents have the same essential interest, that of keeping the property as a desirable place to live.
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Old 05-09-2021, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
4,546 posts, read 10,527,302 times
Reputation: 9523
Quote:
Originally Posted by multifarious View Post
How long did you own that house?
Can you list the major expenses you incurred?


I owned that house for 25 years. Yes, I absolutely kept a record of all of the maintenance and expenses. Sales price - purchase price = 250,000. I can assure you, I paid far more than that in interest/maintenance/selling costs/opportunity costs (investing and not being able to move for better jobs and that's not even counting my time.

Also, neighborhoods change. Sometimes when you live in them, you just don't see it.

I even have a spread sheet comparing rent (with yearly increases) to the carrying costs of that house. I would've come ahead renting.

In that 26 years, we replaced:

Roof
siding
gutters
windows
HVAC (2x)
all appliances (2x)
remodeled 2 bathrooms
all flooring (3x)

and that's just to start. BTW, the house was a well-maintained house. Everything lasted its useful life. Houses simply require maintenance. I never got around to ripping out the 1980s kitchen.

We sold because, based on my estimations, we were looking at some big ticket replacement items. Sure, you can defer maintenance and upgrades up to a point. But eventually you'll pay.

I'm not saying I'll never, ever buy again. But I'd think long and hard about it. There'd be a helluva lot more calculating than mortgage vs rent. Comparing mortgage to rent is not apples to apples.

I find it interesting that on HGTV, they show people buying houses, fixing them up, and then proclaiming "done". Bwahahaha.
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Old 05-09-2021, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
4,546 posts, read 10,527,302 times
Reputation: 9523
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
A home can also be death by a thousand cuts , not just major stuff , but endless costs that always seem to covid up…everything from buying a snow blower to gardening stuff to paint …

Most homeowners do not keep good records or even account for the fact that mortgage interest alone can cost you 2 to 3x what you paid for the house since most homeowners can’t itemize.

All our homes we owned cost a lot of money …early on we couldn’t go anywhere with out my wife buying something for the lawn or house …

We had costs cropping up every where ….but because they are all very low they just go under the radar.

We had to get the gutters and leaders cleaned even with screens 2x a year because we were in a wooded area , we had a plow guy , a Gardner , the harsh winters required frequent re stringing of the deck , we had a bug guy 2x a year .

A tree limb fell and knocked our electric service off the house …we had to have a bee guy come and remove a big nest we found …

The list of things went on and on or else every time we went to the house all I had was chores to do , it sucked .

So all these expenses really added up and eventually I had enough and sold the house .

Our other house we owned cost 169k in 1987 ..we renovated it in 2000 and it cost us 100k …

We had some heavy major repairs like when the water pipe broke where it enters the house under the concrete porch …that was thousands …we needed a new roof over our ownership .

The water heater and furnace were eventually replaced …..

Quite a few plumbing issues yearly as tree roots grew in to the sewer pipe and had to have the sewer guy cut them .

I can’t even remember most of the expenses associated with our homes .


The best deals we had were co-ops where we had nothing extra to pay outside of monthly charges
Yup. The minor costs add up quickly, too. Since renting, we are shocked at how much we're saving and investing every month. It is insane.

The stress of the unexpected repairs cannot be underestimated. I came home to a geyser when the poly blue pipe burst outside my house. Yeah, I had the money to fix it. But I didn't have the backhoe. That was fun.

Also, things just don't last as long as they used to. I replaced a 42 year old hot water heater (never had an issue, just thought I should replace it because it was so old and I had the money) with a new, fancier version. After 5 years, no hot water in the middle of winter because the thermostat went out. Apparently, they only last 5 years. Fun times.
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