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Old 04-05-2021, 06:48 PM
 
2,534 posts, read 1,092,575 times
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We are all different in what appeals to us. I wouldn't worry about what your parents think. I wouldn't want to rent if was going to be more than a house payment.

I live in the country. I can't see my neighbors houses. The neighbors are all very nice, tho. The idea of apartment noise would be very off putting to me. I lived in an apartment for six months once. They were considered nice apartments, adults only. It was back when it was allowed to have apartments that disallowed children. Even renting a house wouldn't appeal. I don't want to have to get permission if I decide I want a pet, or if I want to change the landscaping a bit. Not all landlords are quick to fix things, either. Plus they would be unlikely to have upscale appliances.

I have considered moving to the city. But the yards are so small. It's been 30 years since I have lived in town. I had a big yard and there was an orchard behind it. Now to get a large yard would require living in an older neighborhood. I haven't a problem with that except it seems the older neighborhoods always have a mix of run down in with the nicely kept ones. I actually like older homes better if they have been well maintained.

I don't mind hiring out all the maintenance, it's finding people to do the work. It scares me when we are discussing something and I know more about what needs doing than the person giving me a bid for a job. Tomorrow a house painter is coming to talk to me about painting my house. I'd do it myself ( even tho I am a delicate flower) but the house is too tall and will involve hi-lifts or scaffolding. He comes highly recommended by a friend so I am hoping our discussion goes well enough that I don't feel the need for other estimates.
What I am trying to do since my DH died is make a network of people for home maintenance. As I have been having a hard time deciding whether to stay or move, I am now making the house ready to sell, plus I will keep doing other projects to make me happy in case I decide to stay. I won't sell unless I happen upon a house to buy first.

If I were considering moving to another state I would rent for at least six months to decide if I really liked the area.
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Old 04-05-2021, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
29,806 posts, read 22,861,147 times
Reputation: 37380
I own a townhome in a low maintenance area. Low HOA fees. Property owners generally work together to keep appearances up without being prodded to do so.

My mortgage is $675/month. ~1250 sq. ft living area, 550 sq. ft drive-under garage, 2 BR/2 BA with loft that I use as an office.

I can do with the inside whatever I want. I can replace the heat pump, garage door, its opener, redecorate the balcony, etc., to the tune a renter cannot.

I'd be hard-pressed to go back to renting for more than six months to a year if I moved to a new area.
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Old 04-05-2021, 11:02 PM
 
16,774 posts, read 15,489,354 times
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yes, i stopped being a homeowner, well, decades ago.
i have rented since then, and have always had lovely units with big trees nearby.

i have always loved gardening, and have not had to give that up renting. i was in a triplex for a few years and planted over 1200 bulbs. my landlord loved me because i made the property so beautiful. when i moved he gave me back the whole deposit, and said he felt like he should pay me even more than that.

i've been able to move when i feel like it, and it is easy. i like things simple. for me, owning a home was not simple, and renting is very simple. i like that. it suits me.
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Old 04-06-2021, 04:48 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
21,479 posts, read 22,638,466 times
Reputation: 17892
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFOtoMEM View Post
I am temporarily relocating for work, and planning to use this as an excuse to sell my house in CA. I have reached the realization that I just have zero desire to be a homeowner. I have spent SO much money and time on this house, but it's never good enough; I always see something else that could be improved, updated, or fixed. I dislike dealing with contractors and repair people. I love the idea of not being invested in a property and just calling the apartment office if something needs to be fixed.

Has anyone else reached the same realization, and what were your reasons? How do you explain this to your family? I am expecting some pushback from my parents for renting when I can technically afford to own a home, but just don't want the hassle.
I dreamed of owning my own home since I was a kid. So, I am glad I was able to do what it took to make that happen. It is true that a house requires a lot of maintenance and repairs, especially if it is old.

I also own a condo in a large city. It is in a bustling location, but I prefer single family homes for the space and freedom. The idea of paying rent to somebody else so they could pay their mortgage never appealed to me.

Just stick with what you want and do what it takes to make it happen.
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Old 04-06-2021, 11:20 AM
Status: "Somewhere over the Rainbow - in a puddle" (set 9 days ago)
 
1,446 posts, read 3,440,516 times
Reputation: 1624
My family always gave me a hard time about liking to rent. I appreciated the fact that maintenance was taken care of, yard work was taken care of, I had a pool, exercise room and it left me time to do things I wanted. I broke down and bought a house and it was a nightmare, I couldn't do many of the repairs, didn't have the tools, experience or physical strength. When I hired someone to do the work more times than not I got ripped off. I asked neighbors and co-workers for recommendations, but in the area I lived in I was an "outsider" and was looked at as a cash register. Charge me more than a native.
I finally decided when I lost my job it was time to move back to NC and have rented ever since. I may be lucky, but I have had a great landlord who took care of anything I wanted done, good apartments that were reasonably priced. I know my limitations and renting works for me.

I had a co-worker who berated me because I said I wish I hadn't bought my house. "think of all the tax benefits! I got back over $4000 a year when I had my house". Yeah that was because you have 3 kids, not the interest and tax deductions....
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Old 04-06-2021, 11:39 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
21,479 posts, read 22,638,466 times
Reputation: 17892
There are good, average and bad contractors - exactly like any other line of work.

You have to find the good ones and stick with them. It took me years to find ones whose work I trust.
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Old 04-06-2021, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Tierra del Encanto
1,600 posts, read 1,339,181 times
Reputation: 1996
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post

You have to find the good ones and stick with them. It took me years to find ones whose work I trust.
I had one that was good for a while and did some impressive reconstruction. Then he began running short of money and was a theft victim. He turned to overcharging me and stole things from me, such as a tool he asked to buy that I had refused to sell to him.

A contractor could turn at any time. I had to boot him for good.

With homeownership, it's inevitable the homeowner will have problems with contractors. I try to do as much as I can myself.
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Old 04-06-2021, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Panama City Beach, FL
728 posts, read 387,700 times
Reputation: 1522
I live full time in a class A RV. We move to a different campground roughly every month. We are now starting to see people that live year round in the same campground. They have lot rent. Some campgrounds roll the electric cost into the rent. Other places put you on a meter. But that is the only site costs.

Lots of places have amenities like heated pools, fitness centers, hot tubs, community center. We wintered in a spot that had free catered dinners for holidays. Every other Friday an ice cream truck came around and handed out cold treats.

We meet a lot of people in the medical field that take 13 week contracts. When the contract ends, they hit the road for their next work opportunity. In Texas there are a lot of oil and energy field people doing the same thing. Live temporarily where the work is.

It's not a life for everyone. But for some folks it's a happy alternative to paying high rent or servicing an even higher mortgage. Now with a lot of people teleworking, you see more families in the campgrounds all year round. Before they only showed up in the summer and on the weekends.

For us living on the road is less expensive when compared to the $1,400 a month we paid in rent. Then there were all the utilities to pay. So far, in 5 years, our lowest site fee was $440(including electric) for the month in Tombstone, AZ. We were 2 miles from downtown where all the action was. Many times we find a decent location around $6 - $7 hundred per month.

It's not a lifestyle for everyone, but it works for us. YMMV
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Old 04-06-2021, 04:53 PM
 
Location: OC
8,956 posts, read 5,172,970 times
Reputation: 7095
I definitely see OPs side, but to me, if you pay your taxes, a home is something that is yours forever. I have kids, and hopefully one day they'll have kids and so on. And they will have a place to call home if they want.
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Old 04-06-2021, 05:07 PM
 
87,940 posts, read 85,664,894 times
Reputation: 63434
We will likely leave our kids a lot of money in investments they can liquidate and have lots of choices to buy whatever and wherever they like and not have to deal with some old house I owned
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