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Old 08-22-2021, 10:46 PM
 
24 posts, read 9,773 times
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Hi all, we are looking to buy a new construction. We went to tour the lot and community. We found that there are NGL and Petroleum transmission lines right next to the backyard fence. I hvae few questions, hoping to get responses to decide if this is gonna be an issue down the lane

1) safety - I am sure the new pipelines are safer but would love to hear more about this. Most communities will have gas lines running through but these are transmission lines, may be much bigger?

2) insurance costs - will there be a higher premium?

3) resale - how big of deal is this and will it have affect on resale down the lane?


http://imgur.com/gallery/76XV6md
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Old 08-22-2021, 10:57 PM
 
707 posts, read 526,914 times
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Danger from NGL is explosion. From petroleum it's leaks and ground contamination.

Depending on state the industry has a bad habit of selling degraded infrastructure to single purpose entities without the assets to repair or remove old lines. So it might end up being a state clean up operation when it gets taken out. Some of it depends on what the lines are feeding. Major refinery or transship hub and they'll probably be better maintained. If it's pulling product off a production field thats decreasing production they'll probably not be maintained well.

No idea if insurance companies factor it in.

Would say I'd avoid it if there are other options. So imagine it would effect resale.
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Old 08-23-2021, 09:19 AM
 
4,470 posts, read 4,503,811 times
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It means no one will build right up against you. It means a 50' or so open space behind you (make sure you have a gate in the fence and you get the use of a bigger backyard for soccer, football, etc).


Not sure how it will affect property value. Since it is already there I think its impact is already figured in the price. If there is some kind of incident on a pipeline the value may slip in the short term. I would check the ownership of the land. Is it just an easment and the property can be used for farm, park, golf course, back yards, etc? Or is it a strip deeded to the pipeline company?


I grew up with the big pipeline that feeds the Northeast (yes the one that got hacked) running along our property line. Except for the Cessna that flew along it every month or so to inspect it we would forget about it. As a kid I wanted to dig a hole down just to see it. When the farmer developed the cornfield next to us it became their backyards. I would rather have that then large powerlines.
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Old 08-23-2021, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Kansas City North
5,369 posts, read 9,038,344 times
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I’ve lived in 3 different houses that had pipelines very near (not adjacent, but within a block). Never had any problems whatsoever.

Where we are now there are actually three pipelines, but one is marked as “abandoned.” Don’t know if they keep it there “in reserve” or if they will someday actually dig it up.
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Old 08-25-2021, 11:33 AM
 
Location: SoCal, but itching to relocate
1,310 posts, read 686,668 times
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Speaking only for myself -- we're house-hunting -- when I see such pipelines close to a property listed for sale, I consider it a negative. Depending on just *how* close, it can be a non-starter. We might be overly concerned about such things, but since you asked about resale...
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Old 08-25-2021, 12:15 PM
 
1,006 posts, read 1,748,825 times
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Too many unknowns, I can’t comment on insurance, however, safety would be a concern for me and I think it could also affect property values.

Doesn't matter who says what, there are no guarantees or absolutes, the only constant here is a petroleum pipeline that could possibly be a potential problem (anything that can go wrong . . .): I would pass.
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Old 08-25-2021, 01:47 PM
 
9,008 posts, read 11,702,340 times
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The danger is there, but rare (despite the alarmist tone of the article written by an anti fossil fuel person.) Considering there are almost 2.6 million miles of fuel pipelines in the US and these numbers of incidents were over 9 years....the chances of something happening are miniscule.

https://www.nrdc.org/experts/amy-mal...ficant-dangers
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Old 08-26-2021, 09:47 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
35,878 posts, read 65,322,455 times
Reputation: 41257
I wouldn't touch it, with too many memories of the 2010 San Bruno, CA disaster ( I lived there my first 10 years) and knowing that it will limit potential buyers when eventually going to sell.

https://www.mercurynews.com/2020/09/...lans-hearings/
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Old 08-28-2021, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
4,101 posts, read 2,231,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonCT View Post

1) safety - I am sure the new pipelines are safer but would love to hear more about this. Most communities will have gas lines running through but these are transmission lines, may be much bigger?
No clue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonCT View Post

2) insurance costs - will there be a higher premium?
The risk is likely already built into the homeowners insurance rates. One way to find out is to get a quote from an agent and then get a quote for a comparable house elsewhere and compare the two.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonCT View Post

3) resale - how big of deal is this and will it have affect on resale down the lane?
You're put off by it. Potential future buyers will also be put off by it.
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