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Old 01-13-2007, 12:58 PM
 
4 posts, read 17,216 times
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Please share your opinion on this subject. By older, I mean late 70s, 80s to late 90's. By new I mean late 90's till date. Thank you.
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Old 01-13-2007, 01:40 PM
 
Location: The house on the hill
1,144 posts, read 3,339,310 times
Reputation: 998
I like buying new. You lose some of the charm of an older, more mature neighborhood and large lots, but you get the latest and greatest in energy efficient appliances, windows and functional, open floorplans. There are also trends like home theater rooms, big closets, etc. in newer homes that you wouldn't necessarily find in older ones. ~K~
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Old 01-16-2007, 07:59 PM
 
5 posts, read 30,748 times
Reputation: 11
Definitely newer, if you can afford it.

With the Houston summer heat, you'll wish you had a house built with energy-star in mind.
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Old 01-17-2007, 03:57 PM
 
Location: north
45 posts, read 267,109 times
Reputation: 36
Default new home vs old home

I previously owned a new home, had to move because of the neighborhood. I moved to an older home (1973) to date, we have sunk close to 30,000 dollars into this. I don't know what I was thinking!!!! 1st thing we experienced was when it rained, the rain ran toward the house to the garage. Ripped out the driveway $10,000. We then experienced electrical problems, to date we have spent $7,000 knowing that we will have to probably have to do a whole rewire. Then of course we had plumbing problems, in tune of 5,000. Then one day it was raining, and a depressing day, I happened to take notice in our floor. It was a 70's floor with the Pizza Hut tile in the den. I decided that this made my house to dark, so $8000 to replace tile floor. Of course I like my new floor, but alot of money.

The only thing really positive about my move is the larger rooms, my son has a bedroom that is probably 3 times the size of his previous room. My den is huge, great for entertaining.

If I had it to do over again, I would look at nothing but new homes.

Oh yea, my light bill is about $550.00 a month more.
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Old 01-17-2007, 08:10 PM
 
246 posts, read 833,977 times
Reputation: 177
Karen9921,

What is the problem of your old neighborhood? Can you explain more, since I am going to buy a new house. thanks.
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Old 01-18-2007, 05:31 AM
 
Location: north
45 posts, read 267,109 times
Reputation: 36
Default new vs old

The neighborhood where the newer home stands was moreless a starter home. People have moved on and alot of homes after 5 years had either forclosed or has been rented out. Yards not kept up, some neighbors and their behaviors questionable. Alot of illegal activity taking place. The house we had, when we first bought it was in your $120,000 range. Then of course the rezoning of schools took place. We have 3 children, and we were just looking for something different for our kids. I have no regrets getting out o f neighborhood, just wish the house could have gone with us. I miss that ole house.
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Old 01-18-2007, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
1,610 posts, read 4,602,119 times
Reputation: 1473
Having built my last three houses I have to say that I would not want to do it any other way. Aside from the fact that newer houses have features such as open floor plans and higher ceilings, I want to know what is behind my walls. Every house we've built we have gotten better at the process. Now we hire an independent inspector to come in before sheetrocking and check things like the wiring, support beams, insulation, plumbing etc. and have any problems corrected before they are hidden forever. Sure, just about anything can be revised and improved but not everything and it is sure easier during construction rather than after-the-fact. Plus, it is almost always cheaper to do things during the construction phase rather than as part of a remodel.
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Old 01-18-2007, 03:29 PM
 
4 posts, read 19,398 times
Reputation: 19
Red face Why I would want an older home vs a new one:

I think there are several advantages of buying an older home verses a new home.
1. Established Neighborhoods, you can tell allot by a neighborhood that is already established. The type of neighbors that live there, how long, how well kept the homes have been thru the years ect.

2. Older homes tend to be on larger lot parcels. New construction is usually built with smaller yards and much closer together to save cost for the builder.

3. Lots are already landscaped. Usually with older homes you already have all your shrubbery in, lawn and sprinkler systems. Usually the back yard is totally landscaped as well. And if you are interested in a pool that is about a $20 to $40 thousand dollar savings you will have because someone else already installed it, played for it, and usually that cost cannot be put in a sale price of a home, because not everyone is always looking for a pool.

4. The house has performed. If it is an older home, chances are it will upgraded to keep up with modern style as far as interior. Granite is real big right now in new homes, you will be surprised to find in an older home just how upgraded they can be. (Tile, granite ect)

5. Custom. Usually older homes were custom homes. You don't end up with that cookie cutter look, like in new track neighborhoods. Usually older established homes and neighborhoods have much more character and style with diversity of type and style of each house.

These are just a few things I can think of. This has always been my reasoning. Don't get me wrong, new homes are exciting and wonderful, but as well usually a 1st time home owner cannot afford the upgrades and expense to make the new home look like the model home they walked thru. When you look at new construction in a track type home the models the builder puts on display are beautifully decorated and upgraded to the hilt. This is to make them appear absolutely breathtakingly BUY ME. What the average person does not realize when they walk into a model home, is that thousands of dollars of upgrades have been added to give them such a beautiful look. The average person can only afford what the basic model. White sheet rock tile floors and tile fixtures. Basic carpet, cupboards and such come with a basic purchase. You have to spend years upgrading unless you are loaded with cash to put into a basic home. Usually older homes have already been upgraded and remodeled with higher quality fixtures and cupboards and accessories and appliances and such. Before you turn your nose up to a home that may be 30 or 40 years old, just take a peek inside and see if it has the charm you are looking for. One other note. Usually the construction materials on older homes are of better quality. Better lumber, better ply wood ect. Unless you end up with aluminum wiring in a home (popular in the late 60's) that would be the only drawback. But even a home with aluminum wiring is not bad if the electrical has been kept up and in good repair and proper connection with copper ties. Truly beauty is in the eye of the beholder. People who are totally a new house person would not give a second thought to buying an older home, but if you are on the fence about the subject, I suggest you not rule out the older home. You could be pleasantly surprised how stunning and beautiful an older home can be. And they can be priced cheaper than new construction too! Good Luck!
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Old 01-18-2007, 04:22 PM
 
Location: north
45 posts, read 267,109 times
Reputation: 36
Default old vs new

You do have very valid points. For all those reasons you mentioned is how we ended up in an older home. The only point I disagree with is the aluminum wiring. We happen to have aluminum wiring and we did an upgrade from pig tailing. We kolared our whole home. Just the other day, my daughter was blow drying her hair, I don;t know what happened exactly but there is a big black spot in the socket and it blew out the electricity to half my house. I am just waiting for the place to catch fire. In my opinion the aluminum wiring is not able to run all of todays technologies, computers, stereos, blow dryers, straightners, etc. We have put so much money into this house, I can't have it looked at until we are able to replenish.

Otherwise, yes I have a bigger lot, yes I am in an established neighborhood (exactly what we were looking for) and life is much more relaxed here. Personally, I think if I had it to do all over again, I would have gone new.
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Old 05-07-2007, 06:09 PM
 
17 posts, read 57,580 times
Reputation: 12
are there any areas in the north or northwest suburbs with nice, older homes?
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