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Old 09-22-2008, 11:55 AM
 
4,145 posts, read 10,427,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
What is the point of being there for the whole inspection? The inspectors typically do a better job w/o having someone follow them around distracting them with questions or small talk. The summary at the end is what is important.
Agree 100%. The inspectors I recommend to clients are ones that I trust to do the job well and ones that will answer the phone anytime I call with a question on the summary.

Over the years, I've NEVER had it be a problem not being there, and I do a substantial amount of business.
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Old 09-22-2008, 12:00 PM
 
Location: ***Spokane***
1,093 posts, read 3,423,863 times
Reputation: 465
I am from Wa...state and with the homes I have purchased yes my agent was there as well, for one she/he has the code to the "lock box" otherwise we would have to get in contact with the listing agent..Just seems like an odd question, but maybe some states don't operate in this fashion..The realtors' I have worked with will also go to bat for you if and when the inspector finds something not up to standard, so they are not just there watching but normally jumps in and makes a list of issues to give to the listing agent for a quick resolution... My 2 cents....Good Luck..
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Old 03-28-2011, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Mass.
83 posts, read 325,065 times
Reputation: 114
I am always at the inspection. One time, the buyer's agent was an hour late so it was good I was there - Another time, the buyer in addition to the home inspector had a contractor friend look at a beam with 16 year old termite damage which had been treated prior to the seller buying the home, the contractor said if it were me I would just leave it alone - nothing has happened in sixteen years and the house does not show any sign of damage from the old termite damage, well, sure enough the next day the buyer (himself) sent an email asking for $15,000 reduction in the house price - had I not been there and heard that, my seller would have been out $15,000 - but because I heard what the contractor had said, we didn't reduce the price of the home. Just my .02 on why a buyer's agent should always be present. Just in case ppl are not exactly honest........
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Old 03-28-2011, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Mass.
83 posts, read 325,065 times
Reputation: 114
Sorry to stir up this post again - but I believe it's a very important issues for buyer/sellers and their agents.
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Old 03-28-2011, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Dana Point
143 posts, read 431,463 times
Reputation: 157
I'm always there when representing the Buyer and never there when representing the seller. I strongly believe that the buyer should be able to ask private questions of the inspector without feeling uncomfortable by the presence of the seller or seller's agent.

My clients usually follow the inspector around for the first 1/2 hour or so asking questions and watching the inspector flush toilets, poke around under the sink, etc. They then get bored, and begin mentally moving in to their new home and placing furniture, discussing paint color, measuring walls, etc.

My home inspections have always turned out to be a happy experience that just confirmed that the buyer made a good decision. Except, of course, for the homes that have had serious issues. Which is still a good experience, imho, because the buyer can be saved from a nightmare and I can be saved from a lawsuit.
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Old 03-29-2011, 09:58 PM
 
553 posts, read 1,026,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCyank View Post
At the time of the inspection my agent is still representing me to the sellers and I do expect them to be not only 'aware' of what is going on but involved in the process. We have worked with some difficult sellers, I wouldn't put myself in the position of being unaccompanied on their property with only the inspector (who I don't know at all). I also don't want sellers following the inspector around, explaining why the water line to the fridge leaks or that yes, some windows stick but a little soap will loosen them up. Having a homeowner present at inspection is worse than during a showing, IMO.
Right, and they should NOT be there. Because the buyer is paying for the inspection and they should have the inspector's full attention on the property and pay for his time to answer questions. If the seller really insists that he should be there, just ask the atty to add a provision to the contract that they should not . That's easy ))))

Quote:
Originally Posted by shellytc View Post
And, it is the sellers home, you cannot keep them from being there. I discourage it when I am the sellers agent, but to be perfectly honest, if they want to be there, they have that right.

Shelly
That right mainly comes from the right to keep the house to themselves. If they want to sell it, they will cooperate.

Last edited by Marka; 04-02-2011 at 03:16 AM..
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Old 03-29-2011, 10:06 PM
 
Location: earth?
7,284 posts, read 12,924,187 times
Reputation: 8956
Yes, it is reasonable. I believe it is a service your agent should provide to you. It will help you decide what is a big deal and what is not and your agent can help interpret some of the inspector's findings to you - you both will still get the report and it is just another set of eyes . . . otherwise, you might freak out when really, some of the things that are found are no big deal . . . I think the agent can put both the small and large problems in context for you and can also encourage the inspector to suggest solutions, which he might not otherwise do.

It is just a good idea and I think every professional agent would have no problem being there for such an important step in the process.
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Old 03-30-2011, 05:09 AM
 
Location: MID ATLANTIC
8,674 posts, read 22,913,903 times
Reputation: 10517
People over-think and agonize over which lender to use......and obsess over every fee, yet not give a second thought to the person inspecting the asset of the largest purchase in that point of their lifetime.

I think it's as simple as, do you trust your agent? Your agent makes recommendations for a reason (not for a kickback). Are you using a home inspector your agent recommends? If not, then yes, you should probably ask them to come along, or show up towards the end of the inspection, but I don't think they need to be there for the entire inspection. The agent's interest here is not with what's wrong with the home, it's what is wrong that you can't live with and require additional negotiations.
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Old 03-30-2011, 07:14 AM
 
574 posts, read 1,640,134 times
Reputation: 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmartMoney View Post
People over-think and agonize over which lender to use......and obsess over every fee, yet not give a second thought to the person inspecting the asset of the largest purchase in that point of their lifetime.

People that become involved in their purchase and go to lengths checking out mortgage people, etc., generally also look closely for their inspector, or other service providers. These people do give second and even third thought to all those involved in their purchase.

I think it's as simple as, do you trust your agent? Your agent makes recommendations for a reason (not for a kickback).

The current real estate commission method encourages agents to recommend only those people that will serve the agent's best interest and not the client's best interest. There are good agents out there that do not fall into the trap of doing whatever it takes to make the sale, including referring bad service providers that work on the agent's agenda. Unfortunately the good agents are few and far between and the remainder have cast a large suspicion on all.

Are you using a home inspector your agent recommends? If not, then yes, you should probably ask them to come along, or show up towards the end of the inspection, but I don't think they need to be there for the entire inspection. The agent's interest here is not with what's wrong with the home, it's what is wrong that you can't live with and require additional negotiations.

That is true but the many bad agents out there are only interested in glossing over the major, or multitude of, defects just to make sure the sale goes through. They will verbally tell the buyer many untrue things knowing full well that, unless an independent third party is there to hear it as well, if they don't put it in writing to the buyer then it is impossible for the buyer to come back on them when the buyer goes through with the deal on a money pit!
Responses in blue italics.
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Old 03-30-2011, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
12,475 posts, read 32,243,784 times
Reputation: 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisainCali View Post
I'm always there when representing the Buyer and never there when representing the seller. I strongly believe that the buyer should be able to ask private questions of the inspector without feeling uncomfortable by the presence of the seller or seller's agent.

My clients usually follow the inspector around for the first 1/2 hour or so asking questions and watching the inspector flush toilets, poke around under the sink, etc. They then get bored, and begin mentally moving in to their new home and placing furniture, discussing paint color, measuring walls, etc.

My home inspections have always turned out to be a happy experience that just confirmed that the buyer made a good decision. Except, of course, for the homes that have had serious issues. Which is still a good experience, imho, because the buyer can be saved from a nightmare and I can be saved from a lawsuit.
Agree 100%! And I always go to closings, as well! Part of my job is to be there for my buyers and sellers and if it is nothing but moral support, I'm fine with that. That is just part of giving great "customer service".

The inspectors that I recommend are also there to help the buyers. If the buyers want to walk around with the inspector and ask questions, my inspectors are fine with that. That is part of their job.

Vicki
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