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Old 10-20-2009, 07:52 PM
 
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Recently I was watching a show on HGTV (can't remember which one) and the "expert" said that the difference between a two bedroom home and a three bedroom home was significant, much more so than the difference between a three bedroom home and a four bedroom home. In other words, if you have the ability to get a three bedroom home in lieu of a two bedroom, it's worth the extra money (other things equal), but the same isn't as true when talking about a three bedroom home versus a four (or more) bedroom. Like the biggest dividing point is between two and three bedroom listings. Is this true?


I'm sure I'm not phrasing this question correctly, but I hope someone understands what I'm asking!
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Old 10-20-2009, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Barrington
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Much depends on the area and target market.

In my area it's tough to sell a 3 bedroom.....most want at least 4.

In another area the break point might be a 2 versus 3 bedroom.

In my area, it very tough to sell a home without a basement. In other areas, no one expects a basement.
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Old 10-20-2009, 08:29 PM
 
3,281 posts, read 6,274,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by middle-aged mom View Post
Much depends on the area and target market.

In my area it's tough to sell a 3 bedroom.....most want at least 4.

In another area the break point might be a 2 versus 3 bedroom.

In my area, it very tough to sell a home without a basement. In other areas, no one expects a basement.
Thank you for the response. I think "break point" is a good term!

I know what you're saying about basements. I think in some cities out west (like Phoenix), the basement is a real foreign concept.
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Old 10-21-2009, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Salem, OR
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Yes out here the 3 bed/2 bath is the standard for the average house. When you start getting into more expensive homes, then a 3 bedroom is a detriment and a 4 bedroom is the norm. 2 bedroom homes just aren't as desirable. Older folks often want a sewing room/craft room/rooms for grand kids, etc. Younger folks often need a home office and a guest room. Families just need room.

Out here, I would agree with the HGTV expert.
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Old 10-21-2009, 12:49 AM
 
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I think that might hold true across the country. About the only time when I can see a two bed room house being useful is if :

A. It's a small vaction home.

or

B. The person buying does not expect to have guest often AND there is plenty of basement or other space to be used for storage and other activties.

Otherwise three(or more) bedrooms is better.
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Old 10-21-2009, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Sometimes Maryland, sometimes NoVA. Depends on the day of the week
1,501 posts, read 11,750,593 times
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My first house was a 2-bedroom townhome. It was fine for me, but not once my husband moved in. The second bedroom became the sewing/craft/office/workout/gaming room. All in a 10x15 room. But we could have fit a lot longer if we had a basement to take some of that burden, it was only a 943 sq ft house. I might be ok with a 2-bedroom, as long as there were other spaces in the house that might not be legal bedroom, but could hold a sewing machine and table or a computer desk and files. But really, I don't think I would buy a 2-bedroom again. And keep in mind, we are DINKs. A tiny segment of the market (especially at our age: mid-30s).

But we are kind of stuck on this question with our current house. We bought it as a 4 bedroom, but the 4th bedroom was in the basement (split-foyer house, legal bedroom, full-sized windows). We remodeled and opened up the basement area into a large family room with several zoned purposes, but no walls. We love it, but we are going to need to sell next spring (I am already working 75 miles from home and spending my weeknights with friends rather than husbands). Its perced as 4-bedroom, taxed as 4-bedroom, but one wall short of a 4-bedroom.
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Old 10-21-2009, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,802 posts, read 8,161,124 times
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I know times have changed, and in today's world families are smaller yet houses are bigger. I grew up in a family of 2 parents, a grandmother, and 5 kids and we lived in a 3 bedroom rowhouse. And never felt deprived in any way. My grandmother (who passed away when we were all still fairly young) shared a room with the 3 girls, my 2 brothers shared another room, and my parents had the 3rd bedroom. One bathroom, too, although there was a half bath in the basement.

A 3 bedroom house is much more attractive to a family and therefore the resale value is going to be better than a 2 bedroom. I raised 2 sons and a daughter and a 3 bedroom house worked fine for us. There are a number of houses in my area that only have 2 bedrooms and are advertised as having 2 masters. I assume they may be attractive to single people who are buying a house together or who plan to have a roommate, but not to families, and that reduces their value.

Now that I'm looking for a place to live out my retirement years, the number of bedrooms isn't so much of an issue. More important is the number of levels; I definitely want a single level house - I'm tired of the stairs and that will get worse as I get older. But a 2 bedroom would be fine as long as there was a sunroom or family room in addition to the main living area so that my SO and I could get away from each other when togetherness gets to be too much.
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Old 10-21-2009, 08:28 AM
 
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We viewed a 2 bedroom but both bedrooms were large and it had a full finishable basement which could potentially add another two (if you replicated the top floor)--I am 27, married and do not want kids so 2 would have been fine with the 1500 sq ft+ finishable (we would DEF have finished) basement. Instead we are building--3 up, 2 down LOL
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Old 10-21-2009, 09:46 AM
 
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2 bedroom houses in California never seemed to do well. 2 bedroom condominiums fare better. Interestingly (to me) is now that I am contemplating downsizing, a 2 bedroom house with a small yard sounds appealing. I don't know if other boomers will feel this way.
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Old 10-21-2009, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Danbury CT covering all of Fairfield County
2,637 posts, read 7,427,871 times
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There are hardly any 2 bedroom single family homes in my area, other than mostly former summer & weekend cottages in lake communities that were converted into year round homes. They do ok for people that want a yard or don't want to live by the rules of an HOA that you would get in a condo community. They are not as popular as the 2 bedroom condos in my area, of which almost all of the newer ones do offer a lower level family room or office.
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