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Old 02-15-2010, 02:25 PM
 
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Our builder has given us a walk through date next week and the closing date two days after that. We have walked through and found some chips on cabinets and hard to see paint blemishes. We are planning on hiring an Inspector to walk through with us.

My question: Is it possible the builder can fix these blemishes we find + the bigger ones the Inspector finds in 1 day? I have a feeling the builder wants to close 2 days after the walk through no matter what.

Anything you recommend/suggest that I should be aware of during these final days of closing?
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Old 02-15-2010, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Barrington
56,799 posts, read 39,179,082 times
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Do you have a warranty from the builder that governs how stuff like this will be addressed?

In new construction, it's common for the builder to have a punch list of things to do before and after closing.
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Old 02-15-2010, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
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Definitely have your own, independent professional inspection. On the new builds I've had, those were done a few days before closing, when the house is essentially finished, but not the day just before closing, because you don't want to close until everything is right - it's MUCH easier (for you AND the builder) for the fixes to be done before you've closed and moved in, and in some cases it's easier and even possible to get the builder to make the fixes before they get their money. Just tell the builder that you'll be closing once everything is fixed.

Also, double check and make sure the utilities are set to be turned on in your name as of the date of closing. (You'd be surprised how many people forget that in the excitement of getting their new home ).

I'm assuming that you don't have an agent helping you on this.
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Old 02-15-2010, 04:16 PM
 
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I don't see how the inspector will give you any more 'clout' or authority to get the builder to get the work done, though I completely agree that I would NOT close or move in until the condition of the home is up to acceptable standards.
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Old 02-15-2010, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
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In my experience, an independent inspector will find things that the builder's inspector has missed. As for "clout", it sort of depends on the builder. Some are great, some are not so great, about addressing these things, and I don't know what builder the OP is using, so it helps to have an independent third party involved.
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Old 02-15-2010, 08:19 PM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
36,873 posts, read 41,079,504 times
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I just returned from an inspection this evening on a 2 year old very expensive house. The inspector found about 6 issues such as missing insulation in the attic that was not found when the house was built.

The reason these issues were not found is because the original buyer did not have an inspection. Many buyers think builders see and eliminate their mistakes but there are always issues.

Get an inspection.
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Old 02-15-2010, 10:45 PM
 
28,461 posts, read 76,467,018 times
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Just to clarify -- I too think that an experienced professional inspector will generally have a much better ability to "catch stuff" than any normal home buyer. Builders, through honest over sights and /or lack of a perfect quality control effort, often miss stuff.

What I want to stress is that lining up such a pro and inspection but then agreeing to close "on the builder's schedule" is NOT going to motivate even an honest builder to finish the punch list.

Buyers need representation (attorney and /or real estate agent) and financing that will give them the edge to get the stuff done by a "date certain" BEFORE closing. If you tell your LENDER that you WILL NOT CLOSE until the builder gets everything CORRECTLY COMPLETELY (or at least presents some finacial trade-off / legally binding agreement that ensures the same) that is going to have a lot more motivating effect than saying "I got the toughest inspector around"...

Of course if you are using the LENDER'S FINANCE company and the rate lock is going to expire two days after the walk through...
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Old 02-16-2010, 02:05 AM
 
Location: Irvine - Orange County, CA
214 posts, read 586,537 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
I don't see how the inspector will give you any more 'clout' or authority to get the builder to get the work done, though I completely agree that I would NOT close or move in until the condition of the home is up to acceptable standards.
Great advice here. I would definitely press the builder to correct any imperfection to your satisfaction prior to closing. A third party inspection will be more thorough than a builder's walkthru. Don't be afraid to stand up for yourself with the builder.
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Old 02-16-2010, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Fuquay Varina
5,670 posts, read 7,731,644 times
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We bought a new home and still had an inspector come out. The inspection found mostly small items we didn't see or know the code about.

For me, I wanted the inspection so i knew we were not getting something broken. I also realize that at some point we will sell the house and the buyers will get their own inspection. i would rather the builder fix things now, than for me to have to be responsible to get them fixed later.
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Old 02-16-2010, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX
2,309 posts, read 6,813,783 times
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TexasHorseLady

Quote:
Definitely have your own, independent professional inspection. On the new builds I've had, those were done a few days before closing, when the house is essentially finished, but not the day just before closing, because you don't want to close until everything is right - it's MUCH easier (for you AND the builder) for the fixes to be done before you've closed and moved in, and in some cases it's easier and even possible to get the builder to make the fixes before they get their money. Just tell the builder that you'll be closing once everything is fixed.
Absolutely!

Rakin

Quote:
I just returned from an inspection this evening on a 2 year old very expensive house. The inspector found about 6 issues such as missing insulation in the attic that was not found when the house was built.

The reason these issues were not found is because the original buyer did not have an inspection. Many buyers think builders see and eliminate their mistakes but there are always issues.

Get an inspection.
Absolutely!

USCTrojanCPA

Quote:
Great advice here. I would definitely press the builder to correct any imperfection to your satisfaction prior to closing. A third party inspection will be more thorough than a builder's walkthru. Don't be afraid to stand up for yourself with the builder.
[LEFT]
Absolutely!

I noticed that you are located in the Houston, TX area. Your inspection will be controlled by The Texas Real Estate Commission rules (TREC, TREC - Inspector Main Page). When you choose the Inspector to perform the final inspection make sure that they are not performing just a standard inspection dictated by TREC. This is a "Minimum" required inspection and does not necessarily take into account a "New Home" build. Your Inspector should be versed not only in the requirements of the International Residential Code (Building codes) but also all of the required amendments for your area. The Houston area being on the coast has many requirements that inland areas do not.

If you have any questions regarding this, or would like questions to ask Inspectors when you choose them, then drop me an email and I'll help where I can.









[/LEFT]
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