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Old 10-19-2011, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
28,747 posts, read 31,863,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbel View Post
I know it sounds odd, but I wonder if you could try and make the pound cake at a relative's house or something? That way you could at least figure out if it's the ingredients, method, or the oven. I wouldn't change a single thing, cook it elsewhere, and see if it comes out right. That way you can narrow it down to the oven.

I know when I got my new stove/oven, I had to adjust quite a few of my recipes. I have a Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa recipe that had to be adjusted down 10 minutes; which is a lot in baking.
Ahh, but I have tried different ovens as we've moved around. And my mother moved once, so she used different ovens, too.

Our mixers were different. Do you think the type of beaters or amount of time spent beating the batter makes a difference?

Which reminds me. I remember watching my grandmother cream the sugar and shortening for a cake by hand. She would rub them together between her thumb and forefinger. She learned to cook using a wood stove. I cannot imagine using a wood stove for baked goods like cakes and biscuits, judging the temperature of the oven only by the feel of your hand.

Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa sounds intriguing. What is it?
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Old 10-19-2011, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Meggett, SC
10,817 posts, read 9,647,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Ahh, but I have tried different ovens as we've moved around. And my mother moved once, so she used different ovens, too.

Our mixers were different. Do you think the type of beaters or amount of time spent beating the batter makes a difference?

Which reminds me. I remember watching my grandmother cream the sugar and shortening for a cake by hand. She would rub them together between her thumb and forefinger. She learned to cook using a wood stove. I cannot imagine using a wood stove for baked goods like cakes and biscuits, judging the temperature of the oven only by the feel of your hand.

Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa sounds intriguing. What is it?
Yes, it can make a difference. If you under or over beat a cake mix, that can make a difference in the quality of the cake. I know that overbeating a cake can cause it to be undercooked in the middle, for example. Not sure how that would affect the crust though.

Good news though. You've had the same results at different locations. Ingredients are the same. That only leaves method. Experiment with different mixing speeds, etc to see how that affects your cake.

Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa is a pretty standard Southern dessert (aka sweet!) - kind of a type of bready cobbler. Serve with ice cream to cut the sweetness.

1 stick of butter
1 cup sugar
1 cup self-rising flour
1 cup milk
1 pint Berry Fruit (either blueberries, raspberries, blackberries are best)

Mix cup and flour, whisk in the milk. Melt butter and whisk into the mixture until well mixed. Pour into a very well buttered baking pan (8"-9" round cake pan size works best). Sprinkle berries onto top. Sprinkle some sugar on top. Bake at 350 degrees for 50-60 minutes.
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Old 10-19-2011, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
28,747 posts, read 31,863,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbel View Post
Yes, it can make a difference. If you under or over beat a cake mix, that can make a difference in the quality of the cake. I know that overbeating a cake can cause it to be undercooked in the middle, for example. Not sure how that would affect the crust though.

Good news though. You've had the same results at different locations. Ingredients are the same. That only leaves method. Experiment with different mixing speeds, etc to see how that affects your cake.

Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa is a pretty standard Southern dessert (aka sweet!) - kind of a type of bready cobbler. Serve with ice cream to cut the sweetness.

1 stick of butter
1 cup sugar
1 cup self-rising flour
1 cup milk
1 pint Berry Fruit (either blueberries, raspberries, blackberries are best)

Mix cup and flour, whisk in the milk. Melt butter and whisk into the mixture until well mixed. Pour into a very well buttered baking pan (8"-9" round cake pan size works best). Sprinkle berries onto top. Sprinkle some sugar on top. Bake at 350 degrees for 50-60 minutes.
Aha. I've made Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa and didn't know it! I like it with peaches.

My mother's version just melts the butter (margarine!) in the pan then adds the mixed sugar, flour and milk without stirring, and finally the fruit. She did not sprinkle the sugar on top. You are right; it is very sweet and great with ice cream. Also very quick.
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Old 10-19-2011, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Meggett, SC
10,817 posts, read 9,647,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
Aha. I've made Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa and didn't know it! I like it with peaches.

My mother's version just melts the butter (margarine!) in the pan then adds the mixed sugar, flour and milk without stirring, and finally the fruit. She did not sprinkle the sugar on top. You are right; it is very sweet and great with ice cream. Also very quick.
Yeah, I've seen others just melt it in the pan too. Since I use a old stoneware deep dish pie pan to make mine, I just mix the melted butter in the batter. Like I said, it's a standard Southern dessert.
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Old 10-22-2011, 10:40 AM
 
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I'm a little confused, you say in some posts your mother used margarine, in others you state Crisco. Both are mostly just soybean oil and chemicals. Why not try with real butter instead? Butter has a much better taste and is natural, too. Most professional chefs use better instead of margarine or Crisco. At this point it wouldn't hurt to try something different.
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Old 10-23-2011, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andthentherewere3 View Post
I'm a little confused, you say in some posts your mother used margarine, in others you state Crisco. Both are mostly just soybean oil and chemicals. Why not try with real butter instead? Butter has a much better taste and is natural, too. Most professional chefs use better instead of margarine or Crisco. At this point it wouldn't hurt to try something different.
But the mystery is about the art of cake baking! Why can I not duplicate her results using the same recipe and the same products?

Perhaps it is time to give the recipe:

I/2 cup margarine (she always used Blue Bonnet)
1/2 cup vegetable shortening (she used Crisco)
3 cups sugar
1 cup milk
5 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp baking powder
3 cups plain flour (she used White Lily. Flour is measured after sifting and sifted a second time with the baking powder.)

Let refrigerated ingredients come to room temperature.

Cream the margarine, shortening, & sugar well.
Ad eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.
Blend in flour & milk alternately, ending with flour.
Stir in vanilla.

Bake in greased (she used Crisco) and floured tube pan in 325 degree oven for 75 minutes.

She always prepared the pan just before placing the batter in it.

When she removed the cake from the pan, she did not cool it first. She ran a thin knife around the edge of the pan and the tube and turned the cake on a rack to cool. When the cake is done, it pulls away from the pan a bit anyway.

I thought at one point that perhaps I was covering the cake too soon, allowing the cake to steam a bit, but cooling it longer has not helped. Cooking it a little longer has not worked --- it may get browner, but the crunchy crust is still not there. I have tried letting it cool a little longer before turning it out. Did not help.

The cold oven start did help a little, but that's cheating! Why cannot I get the same result using the method she did?

And now, thanks to southbel, I am aware that the ingredients have changed! Grrr.
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Old 11-03-2011, 10:52 AM
 
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I find that beating my pound cake batter til it's light and fluffy makes a crunchy crust.
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Old 11-03-2011, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjhcarter View Post
I find that beating my pound cake batter til it's light and fluffy makes a crunchy crust.
Aha. I will keep that in mind. Thanks!
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Old 11-03-2011, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Meggett, SC
10,817 posts, read 9,647,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjhcarter View Post
I find that beating my pound cake batter til it's light and fluffy makes a crunchy crust.
Yeah, mine's usually the consistency of a whipped frosting.
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Old 11-03-2011, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
28,747 posts, read 31,863,583 times
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southbel and sjhcarter:

You guys may have hit the jackpot.

I will be making the cake for Thanksgiving. We shall see if beating it longer does the trick!
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