U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink > Recipes
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-05-2011, 07:04 PM
 
4,913 posts, read 9,733,972 times
Reputation: 8443

Advertisements

So I took a look at the salt content on my Weber grilling spices and almost fell on the floor.
90 mgs PER QUARTER TEASPOON

That's a heart attack in a bottle.
Heeeeeeeeeeeeelpppp!
I Googled some but dunno if you guys have a better one.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-05-2011, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
14,183 posts, read 26,757,456 times
Reputation: 27382
This is an easy one. Buy some Walkerswood Jamaican Jerk Spice. It comes in a bottle and looks like ground up twigs. Marinate your chicken in a little of this with the juice of a lime. Yummy and a totally different flavor for chicken!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2011, 07:21 PM
 
4,913 posts, read 9,733,972 times
Reputation: 8443
This sure does not look like low salt!
It looks waaaaaaaaaaaaay too good to BE good for you.
I'm headed to Walmart and then supermarket now--
God I hope they have it--cause I would be in heaven.
Thanks!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2011, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
14,183 posts, read 26,757,456 times
Reputation: 27382
You don't use very much..... Promise!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2011, 07:45 PM
 
5,683 posts, read 9,473,120 times
Reputation: 43762
Are you looking for a dry rub type of spice blend or the basis for a marinade? And are you seeking more of a traditional BBQ type of seasoning or are you looking for an herbal blend? I find that it's a lot easier to come up with a salt-free marinade than it is to find a salt-free dry rub, though they do exist.

<Obligatory disclaimer> I am not now nor have I ever been an employee of Penzey's Spices. I do, however, claim to be one of their best customers, as we make at least two shopping runs to Penzeys per month and our spice cabinet is bulging with over 140 different varieties of their wares. It is in that capacity that I make the following recommendations.

For a dry rub, you might want to consider Penzey's Arizona Dreaming salt-free blend. It has a bit of mild heat to it, and a traditional BBQ type of flavor palette. You could very likely use it as a basis for a BBQ sauce as well.

Penzey's has a number of salt-free herbal blends that we like a lot. Tuscan Sunset is an Italian-type combination composed of basil, oregano, red bell pepper, garlic, thyme, fennel, black pepper and anise; excellent on vegetables, pork, fish and chicken.

Bavarian Seasoning is more of a Northern European blend, with brown mustard seed, rosemary, garlic, thyme, bay leaves and sage; it's really good on lamb, also on pork, veal and chicken.

Mural of Flavor is an eclectic blend of shallots, onion, garlic, thyme, rosemary, basil, coriander, lemon peel, citric acid, black pepper, chives, green peppercorns, dill weed, and orange peel; works well on all types of meats, and is a good addition to soups and stews.

And they've got a new one out called Forward that we haven't tried yet but plan to pick up on our next shopping run. It contains black pepper, onion, paprika, garlic, turmeric, rosemary, thyme and basil, and I'd definitely try it on chicken, probably also pork.

If you're leaning more toward a marinade, then it's a lot easier to find a good salt-free mix (unless you are particularly fond of brining meat before you grill it, of course). You can use pretty much any salt-free blend you like, or come up with your own, and carry it in a marinade of whatever suits the meat the best. We had a recipe decades ago called "Snappy Lemon Chicken" that was amazing; just lemon juice, low-salt soy sauce, and Tabasco (sadly, I don't recall the proportions). You can use all manner of vinegars as a marinade base, too: rice wine vinegar imparts a lighter flavor, cider or red wine vinegar has a more complex, fruity flavor, balsamic vinegar can be almost sweet, sherry vinegar has a nice light but complex flavor - lots of variety.

Good luck to you! We're in the label-reading phase, too, and are regularly appalled at what our favorites contain. No wonder we like them so much!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2011, 08:24 PM
 
Location: On the Edge of the Fringe
5,580 posts, read 4,411,218 times
Reputation: 4905
Toast Some Bread and then crumble it up. Get some low salt or no added salt crackers, mash those up and mix them with the bread crumbs in flour

Take the checken breast, dip in soy milk, sprinkle garlic powder and Lemon pepper seasoning (no salt) on the chickens then roll them in the flour/cracker/bread crumb muxture

Place in a shallow pan coated with olive oil and bake on 350 until done OR place on grill at highest level until done, turning as needed. The bread and crackers will be browned but not blackened. The taste of the lemon pepper beats the taste of salt IMO anyday
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2011, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
28,519 posts, read 31,770,280 times
Reputation: 35591
Amazon.com: The New American Heart Association Cookbook (9780812929546): American Heart Association: Books

You can view the index and browse some recipes online.

Low fat, low sodium recipes that taste good!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2011, 09:47 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,299 posts, read 12,772,639 times
Reputation: 8063
Low salt low fat chicken breasts are an abomination unto the Lord....... but I'll play nicely:

The main thing is how you cook it, not the herbs or marinade. Low fat meats should be either baked at a very low temp for a long time, or cut up and stir fried rapidly.

The low temp bake way: takes nice big breasts of chicken, and bake at about 180F for 2-3 hours. The inside will be pinkish and the juices will run clear ..... it will be safe to eat UNLESS the juices run pink. Doing it this way makes the chicken exquisitely tender and juicy. You can put some salt free seasoning of any kind you like, there are several on the market - but you may choose to do without. Sometimes I like to put slivers of garlic underneath the chicken breasts. Some people use marinades the night before, but those always contain tons of salt.

The stirfry way involves cutting the chicken or turkey breast into small strips. Spray a teflon or cast iron pan with Pam or other cooking spray. Heat until hot and a bit smoky. Throw the strips down on it and gently, constantly stir with your bamboo spatula thingy. Keep the heat on high. Now comes the judgment call, a little bit of skill: when you first put the strips in, they felt floppy as you stirred them. As you continue they will stiffen up. Before they become completely rigid and bouncy you must take the pan off the heater and put the strips into a container, where they will continue to self-cook for a few seconds.

You should NOT stir fry until completely rigid: even a tiny bit of overcooking lean meats of any kind will make them taste dry and tough. It may take little over a minute to fry the strips perfectly, depending on circumstances.

With the stirfry option you can mix in a few herbs in small amounts before cooking, but again that's not actually necessary. You might try a little garlic powder, paprika, or fresh, crushed rosemary leaves for chicken, turkey, or pork ..... onion powder or black pepper for beef round steak cut into strips. Not too much of any seasoning. Caramelized onions (chopped onions fried until they are almost black) are a fine topping for beef, but need to be done separately.

A little on sodium and health: numerous metastudies to this date have shown little correlation between salt intake and hypertension or other health problems. In addition, I've studied the traditional diets of the healthiest, longest-lived nations on the planet such as Japan, Sweden, and Switzerland ...... and all of their diets were quite high in sodium (because before there was refrigeration, foods had to be preserved with methods that usually included adding large amounts of salt).

There shouldn't be any need to reduce sodium intake unless a doctor has told you to.

Lowfat diets are still a matter of controversy, but I don't think there should be any hesitation about eating higher fat foods or frying in "good" oils such as olive. Others would disagree. Personally, I become ravenously hungry if there's not enough fat in my diet. Check out "rabbit starvation" on wikipedia.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2011, 06:44 AM
 
Location: NE San Antonio
1,642 posts, read 3,703,292 times
Reputation: 1444
Good old homemade oil and vinegar is a good no salt marinade, you can customize it with other herbs and low sodium seasonings. Also brown sugar/molasses and a mild or rice vinegar make a good marinade base, you can add garlic, peppers and seseme for an Asian taste, or add low-sodium tomato sauce/kechup and BBQ seasongs for a BBQ taste. For dry seasongs, FIESTA/BOHLERS (Texas) have a number of low sodium mixes including fajita and brisket that are great on chicken. Happy grilling!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-06-2011, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
28,519 posts, read 31,770,280 times
Reputation: 35591
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof View Post
A little on sodium and health: numerous metastudies to this date have shown little correlation between salt intake and hypertension or other health problems. In addition, I've studied the traditional diets of the healthiest, longest-lived nations on the planet such as Japan, Sweden, and Switzerland ...... and all of their diets were quite high in sodium (because before there was refrigeration, foods had to be preserved with methods that usually included adding large amounts of salt).

There shouldn't be any need to reduce sodium intake unless a doctor has told you to.
Not quite so fast, Woof.

Salt-Hypertension

Causes of High Blood Pressure: Weight, Diet, Age, and More

"Essential hypertension is also greatly influenced by diet and lifestyle. The link between salt and high blood pressure is especially compelling. People living on the northern islands of Japan eat more salt per capita than anyone else in the world and have the highest incidence of essential hypertension. By contrast, people who add no salt to their food show virtually no traces of essential hypertension.
The majority of all people with high blood pressure are "salt sensitive," meaning that anything more than the minimal bodily need for salt is too much for them and increases their blood pressure."

Medical News: Cut Daily Salt Intake to 1,500 Mg, AHA Says - in Cardiovascular, Hypertension from MedPage Today
http://www.medpagetoday.com/upload/2...820d0793v1.pdf

The current recommendation is 1500 mg sodium per day for all of us.

I do not want to hijack the thread, but I do think you are mistaken about salt. We can move the discussion of the issue to Health and Wellness if you like.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink > Recipes
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top