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Old 09-15-2011, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
11,817 posts, read 21,440,060 times
Reputation: 5531

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Does any one use a warming zone on the top of a stove to rise your bread? How do you do it?

I have a Whirlpool electric stove, but the instructions do not say what temperature the warming zone supplies. I used it once with a metal bowl and a towel, but it started cooking the bread on the bottom. I suspect it reaches at least 135 degrees, which is too hot for bread rising. This time I am using a clay pizza stone under the bread, and just heating the warming zone for 10 minutes, then turning it off. I will see if that's a better solution.

BTW, I am experimenting with a "no-knead" Fleischman's whole wheat mix.
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Old 09-15-2011, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
11,817 posts, read 21,440,060 times
Reputation: 5531
[quote=goldenage1;20890338]... just heating the warming zone for 10 minutes, then turning it off. QUOTE]

That seemed to be about right, although one might need to let the bread rise longer if you are not using a mix with "rapid rise" yeast. I would turn the warming zone off and on, to keep it feeling comfortable to my hand.

BTW, the Fleishman bread mix turned out good. I recommend it if you have never baked with whole wheat flour before. I use a food processor with a dough blade to mix it, and you really do not have to knead it. Just turn with your hands a few times until the surface is smooth.
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Old 09-15-2011, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
40,248 posts, read 49,757,290 times
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No, but you reminded me of my dearly loved convection oven with a proof setting. I miss it so. That oven and I had lots of good times together. Now I have a pretty kitchen made for pygmies, with cheapo appliances and an oven that is small and ordinary.
I would put a clay trivet between the warming zone and the bowl.
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Old 09-15-2011, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
11,817 posts, read 21,440,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
you reminded me of my dearly loved convection oven with a proof setting.
I would love to have a convection oven like that. BTW, the pizza stone on the warming burner worked well, but I had to monitor the temperature.
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Old 09-18-2011, 09:34 AM
 
10,135 posts, read 24,432,577 times
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Unless there is some new kind of yeast out there, the maximum temperature you can expose yeast to without killing it is about 107F. Yeast is what causes the bread to rise.
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Old 09-18-2011, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Charlotte county, Florida
4,196 posts, read 5,563,959 times
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I have never even heard the term warming zone on the stove top..
I just put a pan of boiling water on the bottom shelf of the oven and put the dough on the top shelf. It works just like a proof box bakers use, warm moist air.
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Old 09-18-2011, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Kountze, Texas
1,013 posts, read 1,234,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caligula1 View Post
I have never even heard the term warming zone on the stove top..
I just put a pan of boiling water on the bottom shelf of the oven and put the dough on the top shelf. It works just like a proof box bakers use, warm moist air.
I never bake anything that has to rise since my current house and my last house have stove tops and wall ovens and never could get anything to rise. I will be baking again
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Old 09-21-2011, 05:28 PM
B4U
 
Location: the west side of "paradise"
3,612 posts, read 7,393,877 times
Reputation: 4431
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenage1 View Post
Does any one use a warming zone on the top of a stove to rise your bread? How do you do it?

I have a Whirlpool electric stove, but the instructions do not say what temperature the warming zone supplies. I used it once with a metal bowl and a towel, but it started cooking the bread on the bottom. I suspect it reaches at least 135 degrees, which is too hot for bread rising. This time I am using a clay pizza stone under the bread, and just heating the warming zone for 10 minutes, then turning it off. I will see if that's a better solution.

BTW, I am experimenting with a "no-knead" Fleischman's whole wheat mix.
Soooo, how did your project turn out?
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Old 09-23-2011, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,284 posts, read 18,570,964 times
Reputation: 6575
Turn the oven on to 200 - when it reaches 200, turn it off and let it sit for 10 minutes and then put your bread into the oven to rise - this works perfectly every time. You need to put your bread into a warm environment, not just heat it from the bottom.
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