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Old 03-05-2012, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,572 posts, read 6,887,882 times
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When I make a basic red wine pan sauce for filet mignon, I always brown the shallots and garlic and then "deglaze" the pan with the wine and shortly after put in beef stock. However, the marinara/pomodoro sauce recipes I've been looking at, some have you "deglaze" the pan with the wine before adding the tomatoes and others have you add the wine half way through your simmer time or toward the end. So my question is, which way is best and what difference does it make?

If you're curious, I'm going to make chicken parmesan, but this time add the dimension of red wine to the sauce, which for me is San Marzano tomatoes, shallots, garlic, fresh basil and oregano, salt and pepper, and possibly bay leaf.

Thanks,
MOKAN
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Old 03-05-2012, 05:58 AM
 
Location: Islip,NY
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When I make a marinara sauce I add the wine in the beginning after I add the tomatoes because I let the sauce cook low and slow all day, about 5-6 hours. I add about 1/2 cup red wine. I also make about 6 qts of sauce, in other recipes I add wine to deglaze the pan and sometimes the recipe calls for the wine to be reduced.
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Old 03-05-2012, 10:20 AM
 
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I usually deglaze the skillet with beef stock after sauteing the aromatics for my Sunday gravy. I add the wine when I add the tomatoes. I will also taste at the end of the cooking process and add a splash or two if I want to pump up the flavor. I also make versions with vodka and sweet vermouth.
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Old 03-05-2012, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
I usually deglaze the skillet with beef stock after sauteing the aromatics for my Sunday gravy. I add the wine when I add the tomatoes. I will also taste at the end of the cooking process and add a splash or two if I want to pump up the flavor. I also make versions with vodka and sweet vermouth.
That's interesting. I thought you had to use an acid (wine or vinegar) to deglaze.

lubby- what you had to say is also interesting, but I'm afraid adding the wine at first will cause it to all cookout and I'm leaning toward adding it halfway through my simmer or after. If the sauce gets too thick, the wine will fix that.

On a side note, I was reading links on a Google search and apparently "pomodoro" sauce is a very quick, very simple tomato sauce that is bright and fresh, whereas "marinara" is a long simmer resulting in a richer, zestier sauce.
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Old 03-05-2012, 10:36 AM
 
25,627 posts, read 32,269,157 times
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You could deglaze with water if you wanted. all deglazing does is remove the caramelized sugars and proteins from the bottom of the pan so it lends its flavor to your end product.

The wine flavor from the grape wont cook out just the alcohol. that's why I add a couple of splashes at the end to brighten the flavor. The longer you cook down wine the more complex and concentrated the flavor becomes.
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Old 03-05-2012, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
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I add the wine for flavor not for the alcohol content in it.
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Old 03-05-2012, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
I add the wine for flavor not for the alcohol content in it.
The alcohol always quickly evaporates. When you deglaze a pan, it's like an explosion to your senses. And I have yet to do it, but when making a brandy or whiskey sauce it flames (as seen on TV).
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Old 03-06-2012, 09:16 AM
 
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Beginning, middle & end... as needed.
As much as the ingredients needs a "wetting", I am prone to use wine instead of water (for wine dishes) when ever the ingredients gets too dry.
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