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Old 06-22-2012, 06:05 PM
 
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I cheat and use cube steaks (the pieces of round steak that the butcher shop runs through the tenderizer) when I make chicken-fried steaks. They come out wonderfully tender and very flavorful.

When I make chicken-fried steak, I start by setting the oven to 250 degrees and putting a wide shallow pan with a rack in the center of the oven. I use a big cast-iron skillet over a medium flame (gas stove here, but somewhere in the mid-point of the available temperature range for the burner), and make sure to get the pan good and hot before I put anything into it.

Once the pan is hot enough, I pour in enough vegetable oil to generously cover the bottom of the pan, wait a moment until it shimmers, then ease in the double-dredged (flour, egg-milk mixture, flour) steak. I leave it alone until the meat juices start leaking through the flour on the top, then I carefully turn it over. I leave it be until the underside is nicely browned and crunchy-looking (lifting up the edge to peek under and confirm that it's ready), then I transfer it to the rack in the oven.

I continue with the rest of the steaks - my family never lets me get away with making fewer than half a dozen - and as the subsequent steaks are cooked, the earlier ones stay warm in the oven. They also continue cooking gradually, and because they're up on a rack, the crust stays sealed and crunchy, keeping all the juice inside. When the steaks are all cooked, they all spend a bit more time in the oven while I make the cream gravy, so by the time I plate them, they're all pretty well-done, but still juicy and tender.

I've gotten rave reviews for decades by following that basic process.
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Old 06-23-2012, 02:13 AM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,775 posts, read 58,250,478 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwesternBookWorm View Post
I cheat and use cube steaks (the pieces of round steak that the butcher shop runs through the tenderizer) when I make chicken-fried steaks. They come out wonderfully tender and very flavorful.

When I make chicken-fried steak, I start by setting the oven to 250 degrees and putting a wide shallow pan with a rack in the center of the oven. I use a big cast-iron skillet over a medium flame (gas stove here, but somewhere in the mid-point of the available temperature range for the burner), and make sure to get the pan good and hot before I put anything into it.

Once the pan is hot enough, I pour in enough vegetable oil to generously cover the bottom of the pan, wait a moment until it shimmers, then ease in the double-dredged (flour, egg-milk mixture, flour) steak. I leave it alone until the meat juices start leaking through the flour on the top, then I carefully turn it over. I leave it be until the underside is nicely browned and crunchy-looking (lifting up the edge to peek under and confirm that it's ready), then I transfer it to the rack in the oven.

I continue with the rest of the steaks - my family never lets me get away with making fewer than half a dozen - and as the subsequent steaks are cooked, the earlier ones stay warm in the oven. They also continue cooking gradually, and because they're up on a rack, the crust stays sealed and crunchy, keeping all the juice inside. When the steaks are all cooked, they all spend a bit more time in the oven while I make the cream gravy, so by the time I plate them, they're all pretty well-done, but still juicy and tender.

I've gotten rave reviews for decades by following that basic process.
That's not cheating Bookworm ...it's the right way to tenderize chicken fried steak. I always cook them in a frying pan though. Gonna have to try your oven method. That would be chicken fried-and-baked steaks ..
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