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Old 03-09-2013, 09:59 AM
 
7,358 posts, read 10,915,585 times
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In another discussion we were talking about how during WW2, chicken became more expensive than beef, and many people ate mock chicken so they could feel like the Gotrocks family on a Notrocks budget. One person asked me by PM for this recipe and I thought others might want it. Here is my mom's recipe passed down from my grandmother:

City Chicken


Start with equal amounts of veal steak and pork chops. Trim off all the fat and cut the meat into chunks. Skewer the meat on wooden sticks, alternating pork and veal.


Season lightly with salt & pepper; roll in a little flour and brown the skewered meat in a frying pan, using the fat trimmings in the bottom of the pan so the meat doesn't stick.


Place the browned skewers in a single layer in a baking pan and cover with foil. Bake up to one and a half hours at 325 degrees, until the meat flakes easily with a fork, removing the foil during the last half hour of cooking. Serve with rice.

This may also be an appropriate discussion to add your own "mock" recipes, like Mock Apple Pie made with Ritz crackers or Mock Turtle Soup made with, I guess, mock turtles.
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:08 AM
 
1,323 posts, read 3,285,977 times
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Thank you! This was my favorite meal growing up. I requested for my birthday meal more often then any other. I used to help make it but did not remember the ingredients. For some reason, I pictured using something other than flour to dredge the skewers. Cracker meal or corn meal comes to mind but I can't be positive. My mother had very few written recipes and now I wish I could go back in time and write them down myself. Thank your mom for me, Cliffie! I am going to try this after Easter.
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:17 AM
 
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OK, that's weird, because I remember crushed crackers as well, but my mom says no.
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
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I first heard of city chicken in Detroit about fifteen years ago; it was on the menu in a small Polish restaurant on the west side (Michigan Ave.). I grew up in Illinois where people called it "mock chicken legs". My mother occasionally bought it at the butcher shop where the meat was trimmed and skewered before purchase. I do not remember cracker crumbs; I'm sure I would as I've always hated them.

I vaguely remember mock turtle soup as well but not mock apple pie. I think I like mock turtle soup but I just looked at some recipes; they did not seem good.

I certainly remember the butcher shop with deep sawdust on the entire floor, even in the customer area. I loved plowing it around as a wee one.

Last edited by Happy in Wyoming; 03-09-2013 at 11:53 AM..
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Texas
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I love City Chicken! I was first introduced to it by my f-i-l. He cooked it just like yours except he browned the skewers in a stainless skillet and put the covered skillet in the oven. I think he added a little water to skillet too. I know he used cracker crumbs, but he may have used both cracker crumbs and flour. I always missed that part . He always made gravy with the drippings, and it was just wonderful. When I would see his mason jar with the flour/water mixture sitting on the counter, I knew that we were in for a real treat. He was the best gravy maker ever.
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Old 03-09-2013, 12:59 PM
 
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I am a Detroiter, but I have never seen city chicken in ANY restaurant there. Good to know someone's tending the flame.

My mom never made gravy out of the drippings; she just dip[ped them out and poured them over the rice. Oh dear Scrod I am so hungry right now.
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Old 03-11-2013, 12:27 PM
 
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OK, this recipe was tested over the weekend because the baking time seemed so very long. I have to say the complaints poured in about how juiceless and overcooked the meat was. Makes me wonder if my mom's oven on the East side ran a little cool. You home cooks might want to start with an hour to and hour and fifteen minutes baking these little babies.
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Old 03-11-2013, 02:15 PM
 
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Cliffie, I am so sorry to hear they did not turn out well. I absolutely, positively hate when a recipe fails to be what your mouth remembers! I once bought this very dish in a grocery and they looked positively grand. I could not wait to eat them. I am not sure if they erred in their recipe but they were so salty I could not eat them. Nothing like mom's.
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Old 03-11-2013, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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I read a recipe where you cook them in foil for 20 minutes, remove the foil and cook 10 more minutes to crisp the coating.
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Old 03-11-2013, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
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My mother fried them as she would fry chicken. She browned them on high heat, then reduced the heat and covered the skillet to cook them through. Baking them...Yuck. They're so small; how could they not be dry and inedible?
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