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Old 06-19-2021, 07:20 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
1,369 posts, read 406,539 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slcity View Post
Perhaps you are right. I just looked at the reviews again, and one person said the cake has "a very light whipped frosting and strawberry whipped buttercream-like filling between the layers". So perhaps the white frosting on top is whipped cream and the strawberry frosting in the middle is buttercream?



Almond is the same as caramel? And thanks for mentioning the apricot preserves, I will definitely be picking up some of those.
It could be a Swiss, French or Italian buttercream. They are all lighter and fluffier than American buttercream. They are also not as sweet. Of course, they are also more involved than American buttercream, involving whipped egg whites and hot sugar syrup, for which you either need a stand mixer (preferred) or a very steady handed helper if using a hand mixer simply for safety purposes.

You are making a caramel with the sugar and water, then adding the almonds. The sugar and water mix will go from beautifully amber to burnt in what seems like an instant so don't take your eyes off it. Be careful with the hot syrup. It will stick to your skin like napalm. (See above about stand mixer or steady handed helper.) Clean the pan by putting water in the pan and let it boil. The caramel will dissolve.

OP, I figured you didn't have a lot of cooking experience from your initial posts, but now I'm wondering if you have much at all. Trying to replicate a bakery cake for a beginner will probably be a difficult and frustrating experience. I realize that's what you want to make and probably nothing else will do (I'm like that), so make sure you have lots of time and aren't rushed. If you are making this for an occasion, I would suggest you do a trial run prior to the occasion.

Last edited by Medtran49; 06-19-2021 at 07:46 AM..
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Old 06-19-2021, 03:02 PM
 
280 posts, read 654,010 times
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I'm guessing that American buttercream is the frosting that I dislike, the one that is too sweet and whenever I encounter it on a cake, I just remove all the frosting and only eat the cake.

Today I decided to go the bakery and buy a small piece of the cake, to remind myself of what it's like since I hadn't gotten it in a while. The glaze is definitely the sweetest part of the cake, too sweet for my taste. The white and strawberry frostings seem to have the same delicate/airy texture, so I would guess they are the same type of frosting. My slice didn't have any of the caramel topping on it, but I already bought some coconut flakes anyway. I do wonder if it is really a sponge cake, since it doesn't seem as yellow as a typical sponge cake, so maybe it's a white cake?

I still have some of the slice left too, in case there is still more tasting/experimenting to be done, LOL. For example, I read that some of these frostings melt in warm temperatures, so I could try that if I really want to narrow down what type it is. But I think I'll just look at some recipes for Swiss/Italian/French buttercreams and whipped cream frosting and probably just go with what seems easiest. I'll definitely pick one that already has strawberry in it, so I don't have to figure out what needs to be changed to balance it out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Medtran49 View Post
OP, I figured you didn't have a lot of cooking experience from your initial posts, but now I'm wondering if you have much at all. Trying to replicate a bakery cake for a beginner will probably be a difficult and frustrating experience. I realize that's what you want to make and probably nothing else will do (I'm like that), so make sure you have lots of time and aren't rushed. If you are making this for an occasion, I would suggest you do a trial run prior to the occasion.
Yeah I am pretty new to this. I'm not going to try to make an exact replica. I might not even try to make the 2 different frostings, maybe just the strawberry one. I can always try it again and change things up if I don't like something.
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Old 06-19-2021, 03:12 PM
 
Location: South Bay Native
14,340 posts, read 24,043,048 times
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With all due respect - why not just keep buying the cake from the bakery? Is this a test of some sort, a self-imposed challenge?

I'm not one to shy away from more complex culinary projects but I've been baking since I was about eight years old. By the time I was actually an adult I had perfected my own choux pastry/eclairs/profiteroles, cooked my own caramels and brittles from scratch, baked checkerboard layer cakes with intricately piped decorations, made individual pastries like the ones you see in the patisserie windows throughout Europe. Heck, I even make my own maki and nigiri sushi.

If I had never baked a cake before and wanted to replicate one that has so many components requiring varying culinary skills (like making caramel croquant), I would compare that to someone admiring a fancy piece of baroque furniture at a gallery and then trying to craft one of their own by themselves by asking an employee at The Home Depot.
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Old 06-20-2021, 09:45 AM
 
7,691 posts, read 4,814,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
With all due respect - why not just keep buying the cake from the bakery? Is this a test of some sort, a self-imposed challenge?

I'm not one to shy away from more complex culinary projects but I've been baking since I was about eight years old. By the time I was actually an adult I had perfected my own choux pastry/eclairs/profiteroles, cooked my own caramels and brittles from scratch, baked checkerboard layer cakes with intricately piped decorations, made individual pastries like the ones you see in the patisserie windows throughout Europe. Heck, I even make my own maki and nigiri sushi.

If I had never baked a cake before and wanted to replicate one that has so many components requiring varying culinary skills (like making caramel croquant), I would compare that to someone admiring a fancy piece of baroque furniture at a gallery and then trying to craft one of their own by themselves by asking an employee at The Home Depot.
That’s what I wonder, too. Each component is a new entity to be learned and then assembled correctly. It sounds like a lot to bite off in one attempt.

Also, why not ask the bakery what kind of frosting it is? My money is on the ermine frosting. I’ve had European buttercreams and they aren’t what I consider similar to whipped cream, more like butter.

I have eaten cake with frosting that tasted and felt like a cross between Euro buttercream and whipped cream, though. And then I read about ermine frosting, which sure sounds like it’s the same stuff.

Ermine supposedly was the original frosting for red velvet cake.

Asking the bakery what type of frosting is not the same as asking for recipes. They probably would happily answer the frosting question.
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Old 06-21-2021, 11:47 PM
 
280 posts, read 654,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
With all due respect - why not just keep buying the cake from the bakery? Is this a test of some sort, a self-imposed challenge?
Yeah, I've been getting into cooking recently, so why not give it a try? It's just a cake, so if it's a disaster, it's not the end of the world. I made it just for me and my parents. If I was hosting a party, I'd definitely buy the bakery cake!

So I ended up using these recipes:
* sponge cake: https://natashaskitchen.com/easy-sponge-cake-genoise/
* strawberry puree: https://www.lifeloveandsugar.com/str...-cream-2-ways/
* stabilized whipped cream frosting: https://veenaazmanov.com/stabilize-w...erent-methods/
* toasted coconut: https://www.bakedbyanintrovert.com/h...oconut-3-ways/
* glaze: https://bakerbettie.com/basic-fruit-glaze/

The frosting seemed fine, although the cake was dry and a bit tough to cut. I followed the sponge cake recipe as written, although I did add 1 tsp of vanilla extract, which the author said you could do in the comments. I took them out of the oven after 23 minutes and they passed the toothpick test. Then I left them sitting on the counter for 5 hours or so as I worked on the other stuff. After I put the frosting, fruit, toasted coconut, and glaze on, I put it into the fridge for an hour and a half or so, before taking it out to cut it and eat.

Anyway, here is what the cake looked like:

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Old 06-22-2021, 05:07 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
1,369 posts, read 406,539 times
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I think you did a GREAT job for a relatively inexperienced baker. I'd probably cover the cakes next time.
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Old 06-23-2021, 08:25 PM
 
2,074 posts, read 804,717 times
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It looks really beautiful and the fruit display worked out well. You said the cake was a little tough to cut. Do you think you might have over-beaten the batter? The receipt says to lightly fold the dry into the wet ingredients.
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Old 06-25-2021, 12:57 AM
 
280 posts, read 654,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Medtran49 View Post
I think you did a GREAT job for a relatively inexperienced baker. I'd probably cover the cakes next time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rfomd129 View Post
It looks really beautiful and the fruit display worked out well. You said the cake was a little tough to cut. Do you think you might have over-beaten the batter? The receipt says to lightly fold the dry into the wet ingredients.
Thanks for the kind words!

I don't believe that I overbeat it. The recipe says if you are using a stand mixer, then beat it for 8-10 minutes, and if you are using a hand mixer then beat it for an additional 2-4 minutes. I used a hand mixer and beat it for about 8 minutes. Then I did the "figure 8" test that it mentions, and the figure 8 stayed on top for 10 seconds, so I thought I had beaten it enough.

BTW, there is still a little bit of cake left, and the stabilized whipped cream is still holding up after 4 days! I had read it might only last 2-3 days.
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Old 06-25-2021, 09:04 AM
 
7,691 posts, read 4,814,740 times
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Sitting open for 5 hrs in a dry region would dry it out. I wouldn’t dream of leaving it open that long here (Four Corners area). If “slcity” means UT, that’s pretty dry, too.
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