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Old 01-16-2009, 12:12 PM
 
17,868 posts, read 16,164,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crustedfilth View Post
I hated my current job when I first started and wanted to walk out.

6 years later I think its the best company I've ever worked for. 12k bonuses, 4 weeks vacation, constantly challenging and always learning.
I couldn't imagine working anyplace else.

I'm intrigued! What caused the change? And how long did it take for things to turn around for you at that job? Where in that 6 years did things improve? Thanks!
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Old 01-16-2009, 01:15 PM
 
28,900 posts, read 50,531,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DimSumRaja View Post
Maybe "it's the reality" in your world but it's not the reality where I work.

In the corporate culture where I work, they love to hire from within and people move freely between departments. It's actually seen as a plus the more departments you've worked in, because you have more experience, more personal contacts, know more software packages, have more technical expertise, and have more knowledge of navigating a complex system.

What they want to hear is "She's great to work with, she gets things done, she knows this organization" and boom! the offer is made. That's why they are so good about hiring and promoting and advancing within because they recognize and value skills and experience and don't mind taking people from other service lines.

And no company "puts me" anywhere. I pick and choose where I go, where I work, and what I do. And I don't go to running to HR for anything, HR calls me and says, "We have an opening, would you like to apply?"
That's nice. But if all you were looking for was validation for a decision you already made, then why didn't you say so? You wanted our advice, we gave it conscientiously, and now you're arguing with us. My experience is based on dealing with a number of Fortune 500s as an outside consultant, and having dealings with internal HR people. Serves me right for actually trying to help.

Last edited by cpg35223; 01-16-2009 at 01:33 PM..
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Old 01-16-2009, 03:51 PM
 
17,868 posts, read 16,164,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
if all you were looking for was validation for a decision you already made, then why didn't you say so? You wanted our advice, we gave it conscientiously, and now you're arguing with us. My experience is based on dealing with a number of Fortune 500s as an outside consultant, and having dealings with internal HR people. Serves me right for actually trying to help.
I ask because I value the input and stories and experience and responses of the people on these boards. It is extremely helpful to hear from people in similar situations how they handled it, what went into their decision making process, how they felt about it before, during and after. I learn by reading a whole range of views on these boards, and appreciate people responding. It's not about everyone agreeing or trying to convince others of anything, but rather sharing what worked for them. There is a whole lot of value in that.

Here's a useful hint: hostility, sarcasm, and verbal aggression are not effective tools of communication.
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Old 01-16-2009, 04:07 PM
 
28,900 posts, read 50,531,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DimSumRaja View Post
I ask because I value the input and stories and experience and responses of the people on these boards. It is extremely helpful to hear from people in similar situations how they handled it, what went into their decision making process, how they felt about it before, during and after. I learn by reading a whole range of views on these boards, and appreciate people responding. It's not about everyone agreeing or trying to convince others of anything, but rather sharing what worked for them. There is a whole lot of value in that.

Here's a useful hint: hostility, sarcasm, and verbal aggression are not effective tools of communication.
Yes, but your original post did not effectively communicate that. You originally started out how you began this position and decided you weren't enamored with it, and then vacillated back and forth on whether or not it would be a good move. So the intent of your post was so vague that more people than just me were confused at what you wanted.

So we all chime in. I add my two cents, based on my considerable experience in a number of executive suites, both on the inside and acting as strategic planning consultant. What's more, I worked on two different projects last year that were heavily involved in HR. I've spent time talking to HR people at various Fortune 500s as part of both projects, and got to know them. And, quite frankly, I had to learn a lot about the travails of corporate HR, so my advice was pretty well grounded in how most corporations behave and think. So if anybody got the ball rolling on the sarcasm, it was you. Small wonder I was annoyed.

And here's a useful hint right back at you: Quit being so thin-skinned and fractious. Seems like I, along with other people on this forum, was tring to help you with plain-spoken, real-world advice. But, once again, you can't help but be snide to advice that you don't like.
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Old 01-16-2009, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Austintown, OH
4,051 posts, read 7,294,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
True, but only if it's not within the same company. If, on the other hand, you want to stay within your company retaining all the benefits, vesting, and the whatnot, and continue to rise up through the ranks, going back out and looking for another slot in the company after two weeks will cause problems for you. That's just the reality of things.

Quite often, companies will put a given employee in positions such as the one that you have recently landed to see how that employee does. Thrive in the slot, and you get tagged as somebody who can do well anywhere in the company. Bail after a few weeks for vague and insubstantial reasons, and you'll get branded as something completely different. I mentored one person who was in an almost identical position. She got a different position in the company that she didn't enjoy, so she asked out of the assignment. Unfortunately, they shipped her into corporate exile doing incredibly stupid things, and then booted her out the door six months later when it became nut-cutting time.

So if you're interested in advancing, running back to HR and saying, "Gosh, I just don't care for this position," ain't gonna fly.
Dimsum, maybe it doesn't happen like this in your company, but, it happens in most, if not all. It is unfortunate, but it does. I have had it happen, and seen it happen, too many times.
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Old 01-16-2009, 04:33 PM
 
14,743 posts, read 31,262,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowhound View Post
I'd probably try to hang for awhile.
Yes, I'm in a agreement here.

It has happened to me, too, but I made it last a bit so it didn't look too short on the resume. A relative had this happen twice - the first time, he had a job offer from a friend who had a lucrative business and it worked out well for a number of years...the second time was the impetus to begin a small business practice out of his home. At the time, it raised eyebrows, but leaving was the thing to do under THOSE circumstances.

Since your shift is within the same entity, I would think you would have to give it SOME time before you mobilize for another move. If your place has this move-around culture, then it shouldn't be that long before you can pick up again.
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Old 01-16-2009, 04:35 PM
 
17,868 posts, read 16,164,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Quit being so thin-skinned and fractious. I was tring to help you with plain-spoken, real-world advice. But, once again, you can't help but be snide to advice that you don't like.
My experience in the workplace, and elsewhere, is that courtesy and respect are valuable traits to cultivate, and are the mark of not only a skilled professional, but a mature and considerate and kind one as well. It requires a certain level of self discipline, class, and personal development to refrain from name-calling, insults, and personal attack.

Last edited by Tzaphkiel; 01-16-2009 at 04:47 PM..
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Old 01-16-2009, 04:46 PM
 
17,868 posts, read 16,164,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpolyglot View Post

It has happened to me, too, but I made it last a bit so it didn't look too short on the resume. A relative had this happen twice - the first time, he had a job offer from a friend who had a lucrative business and it worked out well for a number of years...the second time was the impetus to begin a small business practice out of his home. At the time, it raised eyebrows, but leaving was the thing to do under THOSE circumstances.

Since your shift is within the same entity, I would think you would have to give it SOME time before you mobilize for another move. If your place has this move-around culture, then it shouldn't be that long before you can pick up again.
This is helpful, thank you. Yes, here at this company all they ask is 90 days in the current position, which is easy peasy. And if I accept an offer from a different company then I just say they made me an offer I couldn't refuse, which companies do understand. It's business, people advance.

I am more comfortable doing this now that I have worked in Human Resources myself. Bottom line is companies want skilled people and they realize if you're good and you get a better offer, they lose you.
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Old 01-16-2009, 05:16 PM
 
28,900 posts, read 50,531,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DimSumRaja View Post
My experience in the workplace, and elsewhere, is that courtesy and respect are valuable traits to cultivate, and are the mark of not only a skilled professional, but a mature and considerate and kind one as well. It requires a certain level of self discipline, class, and personal development to refrain from name-calling, insults, and personal attack.
Fascinating how you can take umbrage at the pettiest things. Let's see, I simply state the obvious--Namely that it is not wise to change your mind about a job a few weeks after transferring into it. In fact, in just the past few posts RobertP and Ion agreed with my advice. Somehow or another in your universe, however, I'm launching a personal attack.

It's pretty simple, you shot back a pretty sarcastic reply to what was pretty straightforward advice. Then when I called you on it and took exception to your snotty tone, somehow I'm the culprit. I guess I should count myself fortunate that you didn't alter one of my posts this time in order for you to fit your point better, since that's how you usually operate. That and your notorious tendency to threaten other posters with expulsion doesn't really speak very well to the courtesy, respect, and maturity you like to boast about in yourself.

Last edited by cpg35223; 01-16-2009 at 05:27 PM..
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Old 01-16-2009, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
5,726 posts, read 10,870,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DimSumRaja View Post

Here's a useful hint: hostility, sarcasm, and verbal aggression are not effective tools of communication.
Isn't there a saying about pointing fingers?
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