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Old 06-08-2022, 12:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Maybe yes, maybe no. Perhaps situational.

If I spend any amount of time in a city new to me, I tend to seek out its catholic cathedral (if there is one), and perhaps other architecturally noted places of religious worship. And I think there is some logic to wanting such places to be spectacular is to show respect to "the glory of god". To a degree, what we put into the architecture of a place -- including churches -- reflects what we actually value. Years ago I was in an auto accident, and was sued twice for the same accident (and won in court both times). But I remember thinking that the court house -- part of the criminal justice system -- was all marble, granite, mahogany, etc., while my school was all cinder block and vinyl tile. Let's see, do we really value our kids more than anything else? [Not that I think schools need to be marble, granite, mahogany].

But I think you are also right that -- at least in some cases -- part of the reason that some churches are so spectacular is the intent to convert. Back in the day, I used to watch Robert Schuller often (loved both Schuller and Norman Vincent Peale). I think it would be safe to say that 'image' and 'bringing people in' was a big part of the spectacular nature of the Crystal Cathedral.
All I know is that some of these places have quite the effect on you. Just by looking at them...

My wife and I got married in a church that was all very large tall windows behind the altar. When you looked out those windows you saw nothing but big beautiful redwood trees. Left an impression on you no matter who you were. As all these places of worship tend to do one way or another.

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Old 06-08-2022, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LearnMe View Post
All I know is that some of these places have quite the effect on you. Just by looking at them...

My wife and I got married in a church that was all very large tall windows behind the altar. When you looked out those windows you saw nothing but big beautiful redwood trees. Left an impression on you no matter who you were. As all these places of worship tend to do one way or another.

https://www.theactivetimes.com/trave...p-around-world
I was watching some of the Queen's Jubilee ceremonies, including footage of her coronation, and I could recall how I felt when I stood in Westminster Abbey when I saw it on TV.

Another awe-inspiring place to stand is in Sainte-Chapelle in Paris. Those windows are magnificent.

Sainte-Chapelle

And then, when I was a teenager, the kids from our youth group would go to a weeklong retreat in Orange County, New York, and there was a most beautiful little chapel with "pews" made of hewn logs and an altar made of same with a simple wooden cross behind it. It was near a brook and surrounded by tall trees, and that was as impressive as most of the cathedrals I've been in.
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Old 06-13-2022, 05:27 PM
 
Location: On the Edge of the Fringe
7,569 posts, read 6,017,004 times
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Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I was watching some of the Queen's Jubilee ceremonies, including footage of her coronation, and I could recall how I felt when I stood in Westminster Abbey when I saw it on TV.

Another awe-inspiring place to stand is in Sainte-Chapelle in Paris. Those windows are magnificent.

Sainte-Chapelle

And then, when I was a teenager, the kids from our youth group would go to a weeklong retreat in Orange County, New York, and there was a most beautiful little chapel with "pews" made of hewn logs and an altar made of same with a simple wooden cross behind it. It was near a brook and surrounded by tall trees, and that was as impressive as most of the cathedrals I've been in.
I remember learning so much about cathedrals in art history class. One of these years I am going to visit Paris.
I wandered into a nice cathedral in Quebec a few years ago. It was a weeknight, but the cathedral was unlocked and people were milling around Someone here on CD Forums made the note that in some nations, the churches are not locked up when not in use for a service.
When I travel, I seek out photo ops including sacred architecture On occasion we might even visit a service based entirely on the architecture.


The architecture certainly varies not only with the brand of the religion but with the geographic location, heritage and age as well.

That being said, the level of friendliness varies with the location and brand as well.
When I started my rating system, I started with the churches in and around the Dallas area where I lived. Now this ranking was based on stars and centered around how friendly the churches were. How welcoming of visitors, how likely to gauge someone in civil conversation, and how inclusive of prospective members.
Many ranked 1 or 2 stars, but several, including the nearest Episcopal church, 2 baptist churches and all of the churches of christ/christian churches ranked a ZERO on the friendliness scale. That was out of 5 stars.

Here in Florida we have a predominantly black church that ranks an easy 5 out of 5 on friendliness. The church I visited in Vermont for a discussion of science and religion, which was a building started in the early 1800s welcomed "everyone, believers and non-believers alike."
Compare that to a few small town churches I know of in Texas, where a nonbeliever would not only be not welcome, but runs the risk of getting beat up as well.
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Old 06-14-2022, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Originally Posted by LargeKingCat View Post
I remember learning so much about cathedrals in art history class. One of these years I am going to visit Paris.
I wandered into a nice cathedral in Quebec a few years ago. It was a weeknight, but the cathedral was unlocked and people were milling around Someone here on CD Forums made the note that in some nations, the churches are not locked up when not in use for a service.
When I travel, I seek out photo ops including sacred architecture On occasion we might even visit a service based entirely on the architecture.


The architecture certainly varies not only with the brand of the religion but with the geographic location, heritage and age as well.

That being said, the level of friendliness varies with the location and brand as well.
When I started my rating system, I started with the churches in and around the Dallas area where I lived. Now this ranking was based on stars and centered around how friendly the churches were. How welcoming of visitors, how likely to gauge someone in civil conversation, and how inclusive of prospective members.
Many ranked 1 or 2 stars, but several, including the nearest Episcopal church, 2 baptist churches and all of the churches of christ/christian churches ranked a ZERO on the friendliness scale. That was out of 5 stars.

Here in Florida we have a predominantly black church that ranks an easy 5 out of 5 on friendliness. The church I visited in Vermont for a discussion of science and religion, which was a building started in the early 1800s welcomed "everyone, believers and non-believers alike."
Compare that to a few small town churches I know of in Texas, where a nonbeliever would not only be not welcome, but runs the risk of getting beat up as well.
That reminded me, I was in Albany, NY, a few years back for a work conference that ran from Thursday to Saturday. Since my daughter was at school there, I stayed an extra day.

Albany has an old, historic Episcopal Church in its downtown, the only one in our country within an English Lord buried beneath it. I got up early on Sunday and walked over to that church for the first service.

Not one person spoke to me. No one said hello, no one shook my hand during the Peace, no one said a word to me after the service.

Beautiful building, magnificent organ. But that's all.
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Old 06-14-2022, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,137 posts, read 23,792,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
That reminded me, I was in Albany, NY, a few years back for a work conference that ran from Thursday to Saturday. Since my daughter was at school there, I stayed an extra day.

Albany has an old, historic Episcopal Church in its downtown, the only one in our country within an English Lord buried beneath it. I got up early on Sunday and walked over to that church for the first service.

Not one person spoke to me. No one said hello, no one shook my hand during the Peace, no one said a word to me after the service.

Beautiful building, magnificent organ. But that's all.
Years ago in a catholic church in northern Virginia I turned to give the sign of peace (a handshake), and one woman said, "I never touch other humans".
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Old 06-14-2022, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Years ago in a catholic church in northern Virginia I turned to give the sign of peace (a handshake), and one woman said, "I never touch other humans".
LMAO. Couldn't you just feel the love!
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Old 06-14-2022, 03:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Years ago in a catholic church in northern Virginia I turned to give the sign of peace (a handshake), and one woman said, "I never touch other humans".
Since COVID that's how it is all over...so, she was ahead of her time.
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Old 06-14-2022, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
1,816 posts, read 2,501,147 times
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Originally Posted by cb2008 View Post
Are you saying if a religious texts say everything is a lie, be kind, be curious, and follow Jesus's teachings, and escape the prison that the world is, you would follow that religion? What would following the religion mean to you? Would you pray to Jesus to guide you? What is stopping you from just following him now?
\


Bit late to responding, sorry!


But no, I wouldn't follow a hybrid of the two religions I've mentioned. The reason is the same I don't follow either individually: while I can sympathize with the attempt to explain our place in the universe, and while I can agree with the intended outcomes, I simply cannot intellectually ignore that, as far as the evidence seems to show, they are simply not true.



Of the two, I would lean more toward Bokononism, as it accepts its unreality. But at that point it is less a religion in practice, but rather a philosophy or simply a moral framework for living.
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Old 06-14-2022, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Northeastern US
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Years ago in a catholic church in northern Virginia I turned to give the sign of peace (a handshake), and one woman said, "I never touch other humans".
Lol! Ironically the pandemic almost made that an actual thing.
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Old 06-15-2022, 09:52 AM
 
29,335 posts, read 9,500,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Years ago in a catholic church in northern Virginia I turned to give the sign of peace (a handshake), and one woman said, "I never touch other humans".
She was ahead of her time. Pre-COVID time...
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