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Old 01-13-2024, 09:18 PM
 
529 posts, read 181,783 times
Reputation: 241

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My favorite spell on the moon that helps me communicate with my sister that is over 900 miles away. As we look up at the full moon at midnight for me, and 11pm for her, we chant our spell three times as we look up at our sister in the sky. That sacred object in the sky is what connects our spirits together since we are looking at the same object while we chant our spell.

"Sister moon, of the Earth"
"Hear my Spell, for all it's Worth"
"My loved ones far, I need them near"
"Send my message, with good cheer"
"My love for them shines so bright"
"Return that love, with your guiding light"
"So that we may see, the love we share"
"Is joined as one, with the light you bare"

Sister moon, of the Earth"
"Hear my Spell, for all it's Worth"
"My loved ones far, I need them near"
"Send my message, with good cheer"
"My love for them shines so bright"
"Return that love, with your guiding light"
"So that we may see, the love we share"
"Is joined as one, with the light you bare"

Sister moon, of the Earth"
"Hear my Spell, for all it's Worth"
"My loved ones far, I need them near"
"Send my message, with good cheer"
"My love for them shines so bright"
"Return that love, with your guiding light"
"So that we may see, the love we share"
"Is joined as one, with the light you bare"

Of course we could have just used a cell phone to call each other ha-ha, but where is the fun in that? This spell is just one small example why the moon is so dear to me and why I am so grateful for the Navajo Nation raising their concerns on this matter.

 
Old 01-14-2024, 08:57 AM
 
79 posts, read 21,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by High.priestess.Sarah View Post
But that is not the problem though. We have to decide as a society what the moon is first before we let any religious rites be performed on it's surface. Is the moon a celestial object we need to protect from harm because we certainly destroyed our planet. Is the moon a stepping stone for space exploration or invasion. Is the moon for scientific research only, or can we use it for mining, entertainment/vacation, is the moon sacred where religion is allowed to perform sacred rites on it, such as, but not limited to: burial, cremation, erecting a moon goddess temple on the surface. Until we have this understanding, no one should be allowed to perform sacred rites on it. Placing burial remains without having these discussions can cause more harm than good to any religion that tries to incorporate religious rites before policies are implemented.
It doesn't matter what we decide what the moon is. If we make policies based on religious reasons, then we will still face the same problem.
 
Old 01-14-2024, 09:58 AM
 
529 posts, read 181,783 times
Reputation: 241
Quote:
Originally Posted by night912 View Post
It doesn't matter what we decide what the moon is. If we make policies based on religious reasons, then we will still face the same problem.
You're missing the point, a private company decided on it's own to make money to send cremation remains on a celestial object. This is considered a sacred rite from many people. The Navajo people are not saying only Navajo people should be buried on the moon, they don't want anyone buried period, until we discuss the moral implications of this act.
 
Old 01-14-2024, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,766 posts, read 24,270,853 times
Reputation: 32910
Quote:
Originally Posted by High.priestess.Sarah View Post
You're missing the point, a private company decided on it's own to make money to send cremation remains on a celestial object. This is considered a sacred rite from many people. The Navajo people are not saying only Navajo people should be buried on the moon, they don't want anyone buried period, until we discuss the moral implications of this act.
Considering the living conditions I have personally seen on a number of Indian reservations, considering the level of drug and alcohol addiction on many reservations, and the condition of cemeteries I have seen on a couple of Indian reservations, I don't think they have the moral right to lecture the rest of us on the moon.
 
Old 01-14-2024, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Northeastern US
19,958 posts, read 13,455,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Considering the living conditions I have personally seen on a number of Indian reservations, considering the level of drug and alcohol addiction on many reservations, and the condition of cemeteries I have seen on a couple of Indian reservations, I don't think they have the moral right to lecture the rest of us on the moon.
So the living conditions are their choice / fault? The addictions have any bearing on whether they have a voice in anything?

I lived for about 15 years adjacent to the reservation west of the Phoenix metro area and my impression was you take a nomadic people, force them onto a reservation, they are particularly vulnerable to diabetes (highly efficient metabolism developed over countless generations of nomadic life, that doesn't do well with an abundance of food, especially processed food), they have little autonomy and completely cut off from their way of life, yes you are going to have physically sick and mentally bereft people. Then there's the history of taking their children to re-educate them to act and speak like white people. A major artery in Phoenix is still named Indian School Road.

So far as I'm concerned what they are trying to do to help themselves as a tribe is admirable, even heroic. I don't judge them by their completely devastated and bombed out members as if we had nothing to do with that situation. "Things are the way they are because they got that way".
 
Old 01-14-2024, 11:39 AM
 
529 posts, read 181,783 times
Reputation: 241
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Considering the living conditions I have personally seen on a number of Indian reservations, considering the level of drug and alcohol addiction on many reservations, and the condition of cemeteries I have seen on a couple of Indian reservations, I don't think they have the moral right to lecture the rest of us on the moon.
You have a conquering people that treat you like savages with the right to murder and kill women and children while you steal their land? Your children are forced to schools where they wash your mouth with soap if you speak your native tongue. You death march people to desolate places as part of genocide and you speak of morals? I think you better reevaluate your morals my love because who are the real savages here?
 
Old 01-14-2024, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,766 posts, read 24,270,853 times
Reputation: 32910
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordant View Post
So the living conditions are their choice / fault? The addictions have any bearing on whether they have a voice in anything?

I lived for about 15 years adjacent to the reservation west of the Phoenix metro area and my impression was you take a nomadic people, force them onto a reservation, they are particularly vulnerable to diabetes (highly efficient metabolism developed over countless generations of nomadic life, that doesn't do well with an abundance of food, especially processed food), they have little autonomy and completely cut off from their way of life, yes you are going to have physically sick and mentally bereft people. Then there's the history of taking their children to re-educate them to act and speak like white people. A major artery in Phoenix is still named Indian School Road.

So far as I'm concerned what they are trying to do to help themselves as a tribe is admirable, even heroic. I don't judge them by their completely devastated and bombed out members as if we had nothing to do with that situation. "Things are the way they are because they got that way".
I am well aware of Indian School Road and the school that it was named after, and its history. I am well aware of the history of what was done to the Indians. But there is nothing today keeping American Indians on the reservations...it's now their choice. It's now their choice, also, how they live. It's not still the 1850s.

I'll tell you a little story. One day when I was still living in Colorado, I got into a very nice conversation with a Native American from one of the Indian villages in New Mexico or Arizona that is totally off-limits to non-Native Americans (don't remember now which one). At the time I had been reading about it. The NA was lamenting that white Americans don't understand their culture. And my response was something along the lines of, "Well, your village doesn't allow whites to visit. How can we understand if you totally shut us out?"
 
Old 01-14-2024, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,766 posts, read 24,270,853 times
Reputation: 32910
Quote:
Originally Posted by High.priestess.Sarah View Post
You have a conquering people that treat you like savages with the right to murder and kill women and children while you steal their land? Your children are forced to schools where they wash your mouth with soap if you speak your native tongue. You death march people to desolate places as part of genocide and you speak of morals? I think you better reevaluate your morals my love because who are the real savages here?
I think you need to get out the 1850s and remember that NA people are totally free to live anywhere they want in the United States.
 
Old 01-14-2024, 02:38 PM
 
529 posts, read 181,783 times
Reputation: 241
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Considering the living conditions I have personally seen on a number of Indian reservations, considering the level of drug and alcohol addiction on many reservations, and the condition of cemeteries I have seen on a couple of Indian reservations, I don't think they have the moral right to lecture the rest of us on the moon.
Phetarol my love, I'm sorry I was so upset by your comments regarding my Native American people, but that sentiment you expressed has been heard so many times by people that don't understand the pains they have gone through, while people make up arrogant excuses to demean a conquered people. Please look at this vintage 1990's movies titled Thunderheart. It is about a young federal Indian FBI agent (Val Kilmer) that was selected to be an agent that would be sent to help investigate a murder on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota badlands. The FBI needed to have an Indian representative on the scene to prevent a full-scale uprising because of continuing murders on the reservation and people getting sick on the reservation for unknown reasons. This fictional story took place during the Indian uprising from AIM (American Indian Movement) and Goon (Guardians of Oglala Nation) organizations of the 1970's movement.

Val Kilmer played an amazing role as young man that was part American Indian, but never accepted his heritage and thought lowly of his people. When Val Kilmer met his FBI idol agent Frank Coutelle, nicknamed Cout, he made it very clear he didn't want anything to do with his people. When Cout asked him what he thought of the reservation. Kal Kilmer said "They ought to clean up their back yards before they worry about anything else" it's these kinds of statements made in the movie that is so pivotal to show people how heartless they are when they look down on people of another race. It's very similar to what you said about those drug and alcohol addicts that don't know how to keep up their Cemetaries up. That is so racist and offensive to hear. Please look at the movie and try to have an open mind. If you are not Native American, for one moment pretend you are and see how this movie is trying to show you what happened from a Native American perspective. Here is a movie clip trailer of the movie Please watch it and learn the message and be careful how you demean people of any race because that is exactly what you did when you generalized Native Americans being Alcohol drug addicts.

https://youtu.be/QoOv_-iKYFo?si=-MUNrI4grsPPZbgI
 
Old 01-14-2024, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,766 posts, read 24,270,853 times
Reputation: 32910
Quote:
Originally Posted by High.priestess.Sarah View Post
Phetarol my love, I'm sorry I was so upset by your comments regarding my Native American people, but that sentiment you expressed has been heard so many times by people that don't understand the pains they have gone through, while people make up arrogant excuses to demean a conquered people. Please look at this vintage 1990's movies titled Thunderheart. It is about a young federal Indian FBI agent (Val Kilmer) that was selected to be an agent that would be sent to help investigate a murder on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota badlands. The FBI needed to have an Indian representative on the scene to prevent a full-scale uprising because of continuing murders on the reservation and people getting sick on the reservation for unknown reasons. This fictional story took place during the Indian uprising from AIM (American Indian Movement) and Goon (Guardians of Oglala Nation) organizations of the 1970's movement.

Val Kilmer played an amazing role as young man that was part American Indian, but never accepted his heritage and thought lowly of his people. When Val Kilmer met his FBI idol agent Frank Coutelle, nicknamed Cout, he made it very clear he didn't want anything to do with his people. When Cout asked him what he thought of the reservation. Kal Kilmer said "They ought to clean up their back yards before they worry about anything else" it's these kinds of statements made in the movie that is so pivotal to show people how heartless they are when they look down on people of another race. It's very similar to what you said about those drug and alcohol addicts that don't know how to keep up their Cemetaries up. That is so racist and offensive to hear. Please look at the movie and try to have an open mind. If you are not Native American, for one moment pretend you are and see how this movie is trying to show you what happened from a Native American perspective. Here is a movie clip trailer of the movie Please watch it and learn the message and be careful how you demean people of any race because that is exactly what you did when you generalized Native Americans being Alcohol drug addicts.

https://youtu.be/QoOv_-iKYFo?si=-MUNrI4grsPPZbgI
I didn't generalize anything. American Indians have among the highest rates of drug abuse in the nation. This post is from a NA website, which states -- among other staggering statistics -- that "Despite only representing 2% of the U.S. population, Native Americans have the highest rates of alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and hallucinogen use disorders and the second highest methamphetamine abuse rates. Additionally, Natives are exceedingly vulnerable to the consequences of substance abuse, including high dropout rates, violence, chronic health issues, and suicidal behavior — all issues that are commonplace on reservations, undermining the strength and stability of Native communities living there." Drug abuse on reservations is 300% higher than the general American population. "https://theredroad.org/issues/native-american-substance-abuse/
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