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Old 06-28-2013, 11:57 PM
 
936 posts, read 2,117,881 times
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In my state of Illinois the landlord would have to allow you to sublet it under similar terms. So you'd effectively still be on the lease. If you wanted to be off the lease entirely, then the landlord could release it at any terms he desired.

I'd look into what the case law is in your state.
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Old 06-29-2013, 04:01 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,669 posts, read 67,019,519 times
Reputation: 26681
Quote:
Originally Posted by SXMGirl View Post
Also, most leases have a provision for an out when the tenant has a job transfer that is at least 50 miles away.
I've dealt with hundreds of leases over many years and have never seen this stipulated in even one. There is legal provision for military personnel being deployed.
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Old 06-29-2013, 06:45 AM
 
10,749 posts, read 24,540,206 times
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I'm not understanding how the landlord is being uncooperative. You have a lease with the landlord that you want to break, and you want to break it penalty free. That's not right. Offer him two months rent to terminate the lease and make sure that unit is as clean as a whistle when you leave.

Avoid subletting if you can, you would remain on the lease and would be held responsible for the unit.
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Old 06-29-2013, 07:17 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
33,081 posts, read 77,611,552 times
Reputation: 41369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kim in FL View Post
I'm not understanding how the landlord is being uncooperative.
By not accepting the suitable replacement tenant the OP found.
The new lease in their name isn't unreasonable (in fact it's better for everyone)...
but the $200 bump in rent is unreasonable.

As with most LL's in this situation the biggest problem to resolve is their pique.

hth
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Old 06-29-2013, 07:25 AM
 
10,749 posts, read 24,540,206 times
Reputation: 15973
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
By not accepting the suitable replacement tenant the OP found.
The new lease in their name isn't unreasonable (in fact it's better for everyone)...
but the $200 bump in rent is unreasonable.

As with most LL's in this situation the biggest problem to resolve is their pique.

hth
I guess I misunderstood what he was saying.
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Old 06-29-2013, 08:23 AM
 
16,376 posts, read 21,395,275 times
Reputation: 14368
I don't think he is allowed to increase the rent by $200 for the new renter in this situation. I think he is breaking the law and you should not owe ANY more rent once you move out...because he turned raised the rent and refused a new tenant at the current rate.

I think you should pay a fee to have a half hour consultation with a real estate attorney. I bet it costs under $150. Well worth it in this case. I think the landlord is likely breaking the law by charging $200/mo extra and keeping you on the hook when he doesn't get his 'dream price' . That's not right.
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Old 06-29-2013, 09:14 AM
 
Location: In the city
1,581 posts, read 3,698,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sware2cod View Post
I don't think he is allowed to increase the rent by $200 for the new renter in this situation. I think he is breaking the law and you should not owe ANY more rent once you move out...because he turned raised the rent and refused a new tenant at the current rate.

I think you should pay a fee to have a half hour consultation with a real estate attorney. I bet it costs under $150. Well worth it in this case. I think the landlord is likely breaking the law by charging $200/mo extra and keeping you on the hook when he doesn't get his 'dream price' . That's not right.

Yes, I am trying to make an appointment for Tuesday. I hate to have it come to this, but I am trying to be helpful and he is frankly being greedy. The guy is 83, a millionaire several times over with no kids, lives in a mansion (literally) that is furnished like a museum complete with Faberge' boxes and gilded doors from a Spanish castle in his foyer (the house is on the house tour for the city and I live in the servant's wing), drives a Lincoln, etc, etc. There is zero reason to raise the rent as no improvements (save a new toilet) have been made. The couple I brought him have an income of around 200k per year in the federal government, are middle aged, quiet and stable. There is no reason to be so picky.
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Old 06-29-2013, 09:23 AM
 
Location: NJ
17,578 posts, read 44,539,588 times
Reputation: 16249
I certainly don't think it is odd that he isn't letting someone take over your lease. New tenants, new lease.
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Old 06-29-2013, 09:31 AM
 
Location: In the city
1,581 posts, read 3,698,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manderly6 View Post
I certainly don't think it is odd that he isn't letting someone take over your lease. New tenants, new lease.

Its not odd, but I need clarification. If he says "you have to pay until I can get someone to rent it" that could mean a new lease, or it could mean taking over the terms of my lease. When I asked him earlier, he was vague about which one he meant. Then when the tenants came, he was set on a new lease. The lease itself does allow me to sublet with his approval.
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Old 06-29-2013, 09:41 AM
 
Location: In the city
1,581 posts, read 3,698,767 times
Reputation: 2415
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kim in FL View Post
I'm not understanding how the landlord is being uncooperative. You have a lease with the landlord that you want to break, and you want to break it penalty free. That's not right. Offer him two months rent to terminate the lease and make sure that unit is as clean as a whistle when you leave.

Avoid subletting if you can, you would remain on the lease and would be held responsible for the unit.

I am not trying to break it penalty free and would have offered the two months up front if he would not have been so weird about my needing to pay until he rents it. That could take forever if he keeps jacking up the rent. Two months plus the one month security deposit that I will forfeit seems awfully fair to me.
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