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Old 12-05-2013, 12:53 AM
 
143 posts, read 122,967 times
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I live in a "no pets" complex though at least 9 of the 15 other apartments have cat(s) and/or dog(s). I am disabled. I moved in with my fully trained service dog who provided counterbalance and mobility related tasks. My dog retired suddenly due to a bad back. He now lives with my parents as he noisily objected to me leaving him behind. I am applying for another service dog but the waiting lists for the type of dog I need are 2-6 years long.

I am autistic. Dogs are my special interest. The part of the reason I was able to move out on my own was I paired activities of daily living with my dogs activities. One example is I eat before I feed the dog. Without a dog I am forgetting to eat.

I need a dog now. I know I can get a doctor's letter to that effect. The problem is I cannot commit for a dog's lifetime because I will be getting a service dog eventually. I cannot imagine giving a dog to a shelter or trying to rehome it myself. Then I met 3 puppy raisers for a local service dog provider. I could raise a puppy for 18 months then give it back to the program knowing it will get a great home. Now I need to figure out how to ask the property management company. I really have trouble asking for anything. Any suggestions?
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Old 12-05-2013, 02:58 AM
 
10,627 posts, read 23,953,471 times
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Your 'no pet' complex may have gone 'no pet' and grandfathered those pets in or those people might have their pets without the landlord's knowledge.

What does YOUR lease say about pets? That's what you need to know. And under the ADA act, I believe you're entitled to have your service dog (NOT companion dog, they aren't the same) even if you live in a no pets complex.

Being a puppy raiser isn't covered under the ADA so if your complex is truly 'no pet', I don't think your landlord is going to agree with the idea. But, you won't know unless you ask.
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Old 12-05-2013, 03:49 AM
 
Location: West Virginia
13,561 posts, read 36,688,640 times
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Ask them worst they can say is no!
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Old 12-05-2013, 04:05 AM
 
27,053 posts, read 44,076,380 times
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As a previous poster stated it may have been grand fathered in or perhaps these people are dealing with fines and legal issues.

Perhaps it is better to move to a place where pets are allowed.

Nowadays a lot of people claim to have service dog needs, etc. Some really do and many have bogus claims just to avoid pet fees.

I never understand how someone can even apply for a non pet fee friendly place if they have or need a dog or cat...why making it more difficult if you can avoid issues.

Some owners have allergies and nowadays more people have allergies and they want to avoid issues if they have to move back and that should be respected as well.

Most places allow pets so again my suggestion is to move to a pet friendly place.

Aside from that we deal a lot with lying people who move in with one pet and we than discover multiple pets.

On top of that in a no pet apartment complex you probably will occur many people who will not like to communicate with you since the majority moved there with no issues about no pets maybe because they don't like them or they may have allergies so you are stepping in a wasp nest.

The issue than becomes that you are may be entitled to have a dog due to your circumstances but you are not entitled to have every one to agree with choosing a non pet friendly area to make it your entitlement and everyone has to like you for that, to me it is looking for issues.
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Old 12-05-2013, 04:55 AM
 
1,092 posts, read 3,264,775 times
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Here's a HUD link for a sample letter you'd need to have signed by one of your docs if you wish to have a companion animal in a rental with a no pets policy. http://view.officeapps.live.com/op/v...ion-Animal.doc
Whether or not this would be appropriate for your situation only you and your medical team can make that determination.

This topic has previously been extensively covered in the dogs section of the pets forum. The two instances where an owner of a companion animal is now recognized as having rights, is in housing and flying.

You are essentially advertising to your neighbors that you have a psych or emotional condition when you choose to go that route. Many people can get quite hostile over the subject... So, if you value your privacy, a pet friendly complex might be easier in the long run.

Best of luck.
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Old 12-05-2013, 12:53 PM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,569 posts, read 17,026,491 times
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I also question the concept of becoming a puppy raiser. Puppies are incredibly time-consuming and require constant attention. To house-break a puppy means that you, not the puppy, have to know when the puppy needs to go outside to potty. Living in an apt complex makes puppy raising very difficult as you have to go up/down stairs, keep the puppy entertained - puppies are balls of energy, and you have to keep track of time - when did puppy last eat (they eat every couple of hours) and need to go outside every hour or two - it's based on age, 1 hour to hold it for every month - but sometimes it's more often. If you can't remember to eat, how can you remember to take a puppy out to potty? I'm not being cruel - or not trying to be - just pointing out the realities.

If you only need a companion animal for a short time, consider a shelter/rescue dog. These are often older dogs that need someone to see to their vet care but mostly to socialize them - to people and other dogs. If you have the abilities, you could train your own service animal. There might even be someone in the rescue group who would be willing to help you.

In the meantime, while training a service dog, your rescue dogs would provide the needed support/companionship you require. And you'd be saving a life while waiting for the adoption to come through.
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Old 12-06-2013, 12:06 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
29,250 posts, read 40,136,619 times
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I'm sorry, OP, but service dogs in training are not protected by law. It is only fully functional service dogs that get legal protection to be in no pet areas.

If the tasks that your dog does for you are easy to train tasks, you might be able to adopt an adult dog and pay a local trainer to teach those tasks to the dog. Not everything is easy to teach, but some of the tasks would be very quick and easy.

If you really do need a service dog, a local shelter might be willing to donate a suitable dog to your needs. Get your trainer lined up first and allow them to pick a dog that appears to be capable of doing the task.

One word of warning, though. Do not select a pit-bull. Although they are very suited to being a service dog, it will make your life much more difficult if you are going around with a pit-bull because of the prejudice against them. Why take on that extra difficulty? If you need a service dog, you are already facing extra difficulty with your life. There are many good homeless dogs who can be service dogs without taking on that added stigma.
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Old 12-06-2013, 02:39 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,669 posts, read 66,109,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
... Although they are (pitbulls) very suited to being a service dog, it will make your life much more difficult if you are going around with a pit-bull because of the prejudice against them.
I would love to see statistics supporting your assertion that pitbulls are very suited as service dogs. Please provide.
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Old 12-06-2013, 03:58 PM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,569 posts, read 17,026,491 times
Reputation: 16666
I don't know that you'll find statistics but pitties are great dogs, usually family friendly and easy to train. However, because of BSL and insurance issues, owning a pit can be problematic.

BTW, if the OP is capable, training one's own service dog is quite doable. However, as noted above, an emotional support dog is not given all the privileges of a service dog but is afforded lenience in housing issues. To date, there is not certification for a service dog and there are no certified trainers of service dogs. There are people who are excellent trainers and therefore have the ability to train service dogs.
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Old 12-06-2013, 05:13 PM
 
9,258 posts, read 12,288,503 times
Reputation: 19055
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Annie View Post
However, as noted above, an emotional support dog is not given all the privileges of a service dog but is afforded lenience in housing issues.
An emotional support dog may be afforded leniency in housing issues, but at the sole discretion of the landlord. To qualify for a service dog (protected by law), the dog must perform an identifiable, specific task that assists the person.
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