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Old 12-11-2013, 02:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by S2000 View Post
Yes and some even remove the whole unit themselves.
Sad but true!
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Old 12-11-2013, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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Then the new laws make sense, especially the long-life, non-removeable battery. The permanent battery means the entire device will need to be replaced before the battery dies. The warning feature is the same as with older models. The dates let you estimate when a new detector will be needed. The hush feature allows one to be temporarily disabled near a cooking area.

I guess one thing to add would be a method of attaching it to a surface that would require a special tool to remove it.
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Old 07-25-2014, 08:26 PM
 
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I am highly confused I was in property management for several years but now I have chosen to help both sides Of the fence. My question why is it not required to have a sole detector near or in the kitchen area?
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Old 07-25-2014, 08:36 PM
 
Location: SoCal
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Because if you are cooking you just might notice your stove is on fire, but if you are in bed asleep you might not realize part of your house is burning down?

AFAIK CA regulations require 1 smoke detector in each bedroom and in each hallway.
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Old 07-25-2014, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Riverside Ca
22,155 posts, read 27,898,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovehound View Post
Because if you are cooking you just might notice your stove is on fire, but if you are in bed asleep you might not realize part of your house is burning down?

AFAIK CA regulations require 1 smoke detector in each bedroom and in each hallway.

Smoke detectors in bedrooms
Carbon/smoke combo in hallway and common area

Lots of new detectors are tamper proof non removable battery. The way they get activated is actually at installation time when they are attached to the base.

I install them in all my rentals. Specific agreement to not tamper remove destroy or modify detectors. I had one tenant who removed them all. I asked him why he said they were beeping. So he not only removed them he threw them out. He wasn't really happy when he had to pay 40-60 each to get them replaced.
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Old 07-25-2014, 10:20 PM
 
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I rented two places that had the detectors in absurd places;

- one place had it any time someone took a shower, it went off, I got the landlord to relocate it.

- the other place had it in the kitchen; it was a kitchen dining room combined and it was technically in the dining room. Every time I would even boil water the thing would go off.

And one place the thing kept falling off the wall, property manager would never take corrective actions to make it stop falling.
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Old 07-25-2014, 10:26 PM
 
Location: SoCal
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Personally I would not want to live in a place without a carbon monoxide detector.

When I sold my house in Northridge about 3 years ago all I was required to have is what I stated above, one per bedroom and one in the hall. Perhaps the requirement has changed, or perhaps it's different for rentals. No carbon monoxide required.

In my present house it's the same thing, one per bedroom, one in the hall. I brought my plug in carbon monoxide detector too. I'm pretty sure it also detects gas. Everybody should buy one if they don't have it already.

Just for the record, I know nothing about California rentals, and I'm glad I don't.
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Old 07-27-2014, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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Carbon monoxide detectors are now required in CA rentals.

I also had smoke detectors in Santa Clara, CA go off when it was really foggy outside and my windows were open. They'd also go off if I was boiling water. Odd how they go off with humidity as well as smoke. Seems kind of counter-intuitive. I guess if the fire sprinklers came on, they'd go off because of the water, too.

I live in a tiny studio, and cooking makes mine go off all the time. I do keep a large industrial fan in my studio, and have learned that when I cook, I just turn the fan to blow at the smoke detector, and that keeps it from going off.

I totally understand why people disengage their alarms. I don't want to do that, because I live in a building with a bunch of seniors and I'm afraid they might burn the place down lol, and I want fair warning to get out of here. In the meantime, I just point my fan at the smoke detector.

I've never had a carbon monoxide detector beep or otherwise bother me. Mine sits at about shin level and is plugged into a wall outlet in my main room.

The ones we got at the building I managed in Santa Clara after the law changed, were all plug-in models, too.
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Old 07-27-2014, 01:13 PM
 
Location: SoCal
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During my two years in Hell (between houses, living in a fifth-wheel trailer in an RV park) my smoke detector went off so often due to cooking that it became a reflexive move for me to jump up the stairs to the bedroom and lean out and twist off the smoke detector and threw it into a dresser drawer. Of course I always put it back after dinner.

I've never heard a peep out of my carbon monoxide detector. On the other hand, it's unlikely you would ever experience a condition that would cause carbon monoxide presence. But I have a story for you, and sadly it's all too common.

The usual scenario often involves poor people who either cannot afford to heat their living quarters, or decide "hey, as long as we're using the barbecue, let's bring it inside and we can not only cook dinner but we can heat up our quarters too!"

So the daughter of one of my friends was living with maybe four roommates, and they did exactly this. I don't know if it was for cooking, for heat, or both. Carbon monoxide is odorless and humans exposed to it experience increasing drowsiness resulting in going to sleep. If there is sufficient fuel to keep the carbon monoxide source going it ultimately fills the area with a fatal concentration.

Often the scenario ends with everybody dead of carbon monoxide poisoning. In my friend's daughter's case I don't know what interrupted the cycle, perhaps the fuel source became exhausted. The result was that my friend's daughter came out okay but one of her roommates died.

Two lessons: (1) always have a carbon monoxide detector, and (2) NEVER ever bring a charcoal barbecue, hibachi or other device designed for outdoor cooking indoors, and that includes portable propane heaters often used for camping in cold weather.

I was in Home Depot or Lowe's one day and saw carbon monoxide detectors for sale, this story flashed through my mind, and I didn't even hesitate to throw the detector in my shopping cart.

Any of you folks who don't have a carbon monoxide detector, head over to a home improvement store and get one PDQ. It could save your life and the lives of your family.
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Old 07-28-2014, 04:58 AM
 
2 posts, read 1,677 times
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Exclamation smoke detectors

The reason I had ask about a smoke detector not being placed in a kitchen is I had a slightly smokey kitchen and neither Of the smoke detectors (located in both bedrooms) went off. The whole apartment was full Of smoke but no alarm!! Now before you ask yes both smoke detectors work. It was horrible now what. It just doesn't make any sense why a smoke detector doesn't need to be in or near the kitchen. Please advise what I should do.
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