U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate > Renting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-28-2014, 06:07 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 65,252,169 times
Reputation: 26623

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by dbledcortez View Post
Please advise what I should do.
Put one in the kitchen.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-28-2014, 10:35 AM
 
306 posts, read 485,804 times
Reputation: 438
To all of you talking about false alarms - Get photoelectric alarms instead of Ionization alarms ... They do cost more, but they are less susecptable to false alarms caused by things like showering, cooking, etc. If you do some reasearch, you will find that often times they are more likely to go off in the event of a real fire as well. They say that Ionization is better for "Flaming Fires" but photoelectrics are generally very quick behind the ionization for alerting of these types of fires - The photoelectric alarms are considered better for smoldering fires (often deadly due to the smoke alone), oddly, smoldering fires have been known to not cause Ionization alarms to sound at all.

So:
Photoelectric: Higher Cost, More likely to sound in event of fire, less likely to cause false alarms which often result in people disabling them due to annoyance

Ionization: Lower cost, considered slightly better for flaming fire detection, scary failure rate with other types of fires, more likely to have false alarms due to things like showers and cooking.

Here is a link to a fantastic news station investigative report about Ionization alarms and their failures:

UL-approved smoke alarms may give false sense of security - YouTube
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2014, 10:38 AM
 
306 posts, read 485,804 times
Reputation: 438
And since people are talking about placement - I have in my 1900 sq ft house 9 alarms all photoelectric w/ carbon monoxide - One in each BR, one in each hallway, family room, living room (Near kitchen), and utility room... Also have 4 fire extinguishers in the house. I have been trained to fight fires in a past life, I feel quite well protected
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2014, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
33,518 posts, read 35,667,432 times
Reputation: 40068
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkull View Post
To all of you talking about false alarms - Get photoelectric alarms instead of Ionization alarms ... They do cost more, but they are less susecptable to false alarms caused by things like showering, cooking, etc. If you do some reasearch, you will find that often times they are more likely to go off in the event of a real fire as well. They say that Ionization is better for "Flaming Fires" but photoelectrics are generally very quick behind the ionization for alerting of these types of fires - The photoelectric alarms are considered better for smoldering fires (often deadly due to the smoke alone), oddly, smoldering fires have been known to not cause Ionization alarms to sound at all.

So:
Photoelectric: Higher Cost, More likely to sound in event of fire, less likely to cause false alarms which often result in people disabling them due to annoyance

Ionization: Lower cost, considered slightly better for flaming fire detection, scary failure rate with other types of fires, more likely to have false alarms due to things like showers and cooking.

Here is a link to a fantastic news station investigative report about Ionization alarms and their failures:

UL-approved smoke alarms may give false sense of security - YouTube
That may explain an incident that happened in my home. One of my sons fell asleep with a lamp on next to his bed. Somehow he knocked the lamp onto his bed and the hot bulb scorched his down comforter enough that when I got up I could smell smoke, but the smoke alarm in the hallway next to his room did not go off. There were no flames.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2014, 12:03 PM
 
Location: SoCal
14,530 posts, read 17,891,710 times
Reputation: 10499
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbledcortez View Post
It just doesn't make any sense why a smoke detector doesn't need to be in or near the kitchen.
If you put a smoke detector in the kitchen it's going to be going off all the time. The assumption is that people who are awake will smell smoke or see fire and do something about it.

They put smoke detectors in hallways and bedrooms to protect sleeping people and their path of escape.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2014, 12:08 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 65,252,169 times
Reputation: 26623
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovehound View Post
If you put a smoke detector in the kitchen it's going to be going off all the time.
Only if you're a pretty lousy/careless cook! My restaurant detectors didn't go off once in 16 years (yes, they were regularly checked and it was a very busy kitchen) and the only time in the last several years that a home kitchen detector went off was when something spilled in the oven, started burning and sent up clouds of smoke.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2014, 12:13 PM
 
306 posts, read 485,804 times
Reputation: 438
Quote:
Originally Posted by STT Resident View Post
Only if you're a pretty lousy/careless cook! My restaurant detectors didn't go off once in 16 years (yes, they were regularly checked and it was a very busy kitchen) and the only time in the last several years that a home kitchen detector went off was when something spilled in the oven, started burning and sent up clouds of smoke.
Some alarms will sound because your making toast - The type of alarm really does come into consideration with this... I personally would not put one in the kitchen and figure that if smoke hits the adjacent room the alarm in that room is enough.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2014, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,816 posts, read 28,459,382 times
Reputation: 38259
I wouldn't want to wait until the kitchen fire gets really going before it wakes me up down the hall. In my current apt, which is a studio, it's a non-issue as it's in the middle of the space on the ceiling, and the carbon monoxide alarm is plugged into the socket at shin height in the same room.

But, to be honest, twice now I've left a burner on when I thought I'd turned it off. Nothing was left on the burner, and I noticed the light on the stove both times. But, my point is that, it would be entirely possible to have a fire start in a kitchen after you've gone to bed. My rice cooker for instance, will automatically turn itself to "warm" but won't shut itself off. So, I could forget about the rice cooker that's plugged in. A crockpot could malfunction that's plugged in. Heck, electrical fires can start from anything plugged in, like a toaster, right?

In my last apartment, the kitchen was open to the living room, which had a smoke detector, so if anything would catch fire in the kitchen, the nearby smoke detector would sound the alarm.

I like the idea of these photo-electric alarms. Thanks for the info. I know I have been bad in the past about disconnecting alarms that kept going off, and not re-connecting them right away. And I know tenants are bad about doing this, too. Sounds like these photo-electric alarms would be worth the money for landlords to install.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate > Renting
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:03 PM.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top