U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Rhode Island
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-19-2016, 05:55 PM
 
Location: College Hill
2,903 posts, read 2,873,174 times
Reputation: 1796

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollytree View Post
Merriam Webster's definition of suburb:

Full Definition of suburb
a : an outlying part of a city or town
b : a smaller community adjacent to or within commuting distance of a city
c plural : the residential area on the outskirts of a city or large town

The first definition is the one most often used by urban planners.
I'd agree. A thing that makes Northeastern suburbs different than, say, Columbus or even Philly, is the distance between cities and burbs. In RI, not much distance and I think that affects the relationship between the city and its outer areas -- makes it blur into one.




Quote:
Originally Posted by quilterchick View Post


absolutely relate to that paragraph bofd and see that you are 'grounded' in your beliefs as a result of a good upbringing. that is why they have a hard time trying to assimilate here .... They even take their new york (or fl) license plates off their cars shortly after moving in. I have very good friends here from rochester and upstate ny, who upon first meeting qualified that ny is a very large state and don't want to be lumped in with the pushy loud 'lawnguyisland' / manhattan crowd. A high percentage of ny'ers coming halfway back from fl are often just as, or more rude, as they scour our area for 2nd or 3rd homes approaching or exceeding a million $+.

On the other hand we also have wonderful people here who worked very hard, owned business etc., and were just biding their time to get out of ny, nj, ri, etc. Down to earth, well-grounded friendly folks, who aren't showoffs, and who appreciate the peace and quiet and weather that they find here -- only own one home, and give back generously as benefactors to charitable organizations and land conservation efforts.

to add another reply to the topic at hand though, i would say "no", not all suburbs in ri feel the same -- they are merely suburbs in a very small state. In ri, you could also consider a few of the ma or ct towns suburbs of ri.

Last edited by CaseyB; 06-19-2016 at 07:11 PM.. Reason: this is very rude
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-19-2016, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Earth, a nice neighborhood in the Milky Way
2,575 posts, read 1,694,131 times
Reputation: 1120
Quote:
Originally Posted by boulevardofdef View Post
I read something interesting about Rhode Island and suburbs a while back, I believe in a travel book I bought the first time I visited the state. The writer noted that Rhode Island is unique in that outside of Providence, every place is a suburb and no place is a suburb. Everything is firmly in the orbit of Providence, and Providence dominates the state in a lot of ways. At the same time, every single city and town has a distinct identity apart from "suburb of Providence." This isn't true everywhere. I, for instance, grew up in a suburb of New York that wasn't really anything other than a suburb of New York. When traveling, people from there will invariably tell others they're "from New York," meaning the city. I don't get the sense anyone in Rhode Island tells outsiders they're "from Providence," unless they actually are.
It's not like this just in Rhode Island, but in Mass. too.

On the west coast, one identifies their origin depending upon the audience: if the listener is a local, the speaker will say what town they are from; if the listener is non-local, the speaker will round up to the nearest major city. It's natural.

In New England, I have observed that it doesn't matter who the audience is. You simply identify the town, and it is up to the listener to have the necessary depth of geographical knowledge to reference. But I also know transplanted New Englanders--now living on the west coast--from towns nearby to Providence or Boston who adapt and cite the bigger city because nobody has heard of Cumberland or Malden. The milieu is important too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sandsonik View Post
Yes, yes. A thousand times YES! No Rhode Islander
considers their town a suburb of Providence. It's a real town that stands independent, has its own identity. It's one thing I learned when travelling; in other parts of the country, if you ask people where they're from they name the nearest known city, even if their town is 30 minutes to an hour away.

A person from Coventry, Warwick or Cumberland would never tell a stranger they are from Providence. They are not. They may not have a problem with being called suburban but it would raise their hackles to hear they are a suburb of Providence because it implies 'just' and it robs them of their identity. When a town has been around for a few hundred years, alongside Providence, and families have roots that go back generations in that town, it's weird to hear it being spoken of only in relation to Providence.

But in other parts of the country with very large cities, there do seem to be bedroom community suburbs that sprung up to serve city workers where that is their identity and it doesn t seem to bother them. Their pride and allegiance may be different.
That's right. Rhode Island, being one of the original 13 colonies, has a long memory. In addition to what I wrote above regarding the west (for instance), it does depend a little upon the age of the town. A tract home suburban sprawl nightmare 'settlement' is unlikely to register to anyone but locals, and speakers get trained to round up to the nearest large neighbor. There isn't any significant widespread news about the place for the listener to reference; rounding up saves conversational time and is close enough. But if the place has been around a while, had some story of national or regional import occur, some history, it might begin to have its own identity to stand upon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2016, 07:03 PM
 
11,109 posts, read 15,750,318 times
Reputation: 10059
Quote:
Originally Posted by ormari View Post
It's not like this just in Rhode Island, but in Mass. too.



That's right. Rhode Island, being one of the original 13 colonies, has a long memory. In addition to what I wrote above regarding the west (for instance), it does depend a little upon the age of the town. A tract home suburban sprawl nightmare 'settlement' is unlikely to register to anyone but locals, and speakers get trained to round up to the nearest large neighbor. There isn't any significant widespread news about the place for the listener to reference; rounding up saves conversational time and is close enough. But if the place has been around a while, had some story of national or regional import occur, some history, it might begin to have its own identity to stand upon.


Yes, such as Oaklawn in Cranston; also Diamond Hill, or Arnold Mills,which are popular areas in Cumberland. There are several other small recognizable older areas in RI that people identify with. Western Cranston is another, only because it is a higher income area within Cranston itself which is usually considered lower income, such as Edgewood in Cranston. The Riverside area of East Providence, or Kent Heights, are other examples. RI has these quirky little areas that are not towns, just areas that have their own identity within a city or town.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2016, 08:29 PM
 
9,646 posts, read 8,325,466 times
Reputation: 5899
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlfieBoy View Post
Could be, but Alfieboy also knows a thing or two about urban planning and the social/physical construct of cities. So it is entirely appropriate for me to say that one needs to walk around to observe people and their interactions in an urban/suburban ecosystem --I am well-positioned to make comments as I have never known anything but urban living. So you can see where I view your opinion as limited (if not flawed): you don't have a body of knowledge on urban life, on the working of an interactive social system.
Born and raised in the city, now live in a small town in rural ME. Spent most of my time in between, in the suburbs. Unlike yourself, I think I've covered all grounds. You say "urban/suburban" ecosystem, as though the two are indistinguishable. They are not at all. To know one is to not know both. Even within the city limits, those living in Elmhurst or Olneyville live are in a much different "ecosystem" than a College Hill dweller like yourself.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AlfieBoy View Post
It's a big world with lots of options and opportunities to live a life that best suits each individual. And this affects how we relate to the environment and to others. For example, in my old city, the notion of owning a car is pretty alien and would invoke incredulity among many -- only 23% of households in Manhattan own a car and less than 25% even have a driver's license. So the worldview of drivers and non-drivers affects where we live, who we hang with, where we dine and almost everything related to distance is a calculated factor in many spects of our lives. So in NYC, you'd be the odd duck; here in Rhody, it's me. So yes, it's a different planet, but it in no way limits my understanding of suburbs. I keep hammering this because it always seems like you need to get info drilled into your head about twenty times before you (maybe) get it.
Again, all that proves is your lack of familiarity and understanding of anything outside the most urban of lifestyles. I do not see how your time spent in Manhattan qualifies you to post about the suburbs of RI. You're in the wrong thread sir.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AlfieBoy View Post
You made inferences and when called on them you want everyone to dummy up. No, that's poor sport and intellectually weak. Sansonik appropriately inquired:



You believe yourself the Rhode Island expert, you think you have gems of wisdom, so, like, where is this knowledge and keen insight, insight that you, who have never lived in this city or this state, keep proclaiming makes you "unique" and of value to read? Where is it? Show the goods...

It's a kind of humor you may not appreciate as a non-New Englander. The fact is, RIers generally don't consider themselves to be the most sophisticated conversationalists. I may not fully agree, and realize that are other folk out there who fall much shorter in that regard; but the truth is that us NEers tend to be harder on ourselves than anyone else.

As for me being a "Rhode Island expert", when did I make such a claim??? I had family there (was almost born in Providence), spent much time in the state for work and education, and as a result have had many friends and acquaintances either from there or who still live there. I also lived many years abutting RI, and traveled back and forth on a regular basis. My personal view, is that fully qualifies me to post on areas that come up in threads that I some some level of familiarity with. And yes. Even though you live in RI and I don't, I still have more insight to offer a thread such as this. I fully appreciate your extensive block by block knowledge of your section of PVD, but you really need to quit while you're ahead...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollytree View Post
Merriam Webster's definition of suburb:

Full Definition of suburb
a : an outlying part of a city or town
b : a smaller community adjacent to or within commuting distance of a city
c plural : the residential area on the outskirts of a city or large town

The first definition is the one most often used by urban planners.
I don't know, but I don't see what today's urban planners have to do with this thread about preexisting RI towns. It's more about how they function in the present.

Quote:
Originally Posted by QuilterChick View Post
Yes, such as Oaklawn in Cranston; also Diamond Hill, or Arnold Mills,which are popular areas in Cumberland. There are several other small recognizable older areas in RI that people identify with. Western Cranston is another, only because it is a higher income area within Cranston itself which is usually considered lower income, such as Edgewood in Cranston. The Riverside area of East Providence, or Kent Heights, are other examples. RI has these quirky little areas that are not towns, just areas that have their own identity within a city or town.
It seems even more pronounced in S County. People are much more likely to identify with Kingston or Wakefield than North or South Kingstown. Glocester is another place like that.

Coming from a neighborhood of Boston, I have to be out of state to start saying I am "from Boston" as opposed to my particular neighborhood which I have always identified with. Being in Maine for over a year now, I still feel weird saying I am "from Boston". It feels sort of misleading as Downtown Boston might as well be another planet from where I come from, but that is the first think that probably comes to mind for a typical Mainer.

Last edited by massnative71; 06-19-2016 at 08:45 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2016, 09:29 PM
 
1,594 posts, read 1,687,168 times
Reputation: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71
It's a kind of humor you may not appreciate. It's a kind of humor you may not appreciate as a non-New Englander. The fact is, RIers generally don't consider themselves to be the most sophisticated conversationalists.
Sir, you know nothing of Rhode Islanders or how they regard their own conversational skills. You were just trying to make a sly insult, but are too cowardly to own it.

I lived in Boston, worked in Boston, have friends in Boston but don't pretend to know how a Bostonian thinks or how they, enjoying masses, regard their conversational skills.
Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71

It seems even more pronounced in S County. People are much more likely to identify with Kingston or Wakefield than North or South Kingstown. Glocester is another place like that.
Every town has villages. You would hear the same from residents of Olneyville, Fox Point, Rumford, Darlington, Greene, Anthony, Fiskeville, Natick, etc. It's not a north/south thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative
Coming from a neighborhood of Boston, I have to be out of state to start saying I am "from Boston" as opposed to my particular neighborhood which I have always identified with. Being in Maine for over a year now, I still feel weird saying I am "from Boston". It feels sort of misleading as Downtown Boston might as well be another planet from where I come from, but that is the first think that probably comes to mind for a typical Mainer.
Why don't you tell them you're from Seekonk? It's been a long, long time since you lived in Boston, hasn't it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2016, 09:42 PM
 
11,109 posts, read 15,750,318 times
Reputation: 10059
This forum and the entirety of every forum on C-D is open to any and all folks, wherever they are from -- originally or not. Anywhere in this world, the freedom to respond is open and moreover welcomed by the creation of and administration of City Data.


We do not need to apologize for our origins, whether country, state, town or village. We do not need to apologize for our opinions, which are made with good intentions in the spirit of helping others, perfect strangers simply asking questions about relocation -- and we certainly don't need to read the vitriol that has been going on for much too long when some of us are identified as no longer living or working in a certain state. What does it matter? It does not matter, qualified to answer the questions is what this forum is all about. Qualified to give an intelligent response.


We all have an equal opportunity to intelligently respond to the people who come on here for advice. They do not have to read through the personal attacks, veiled foul language, or read about various proclivities of posters using this forum as their personal anonymous podium.


Unfortunately, we are living in a world where one maniac with a warped agenda can end the lives of 50 innocent people and forever ruin the lives of 49 others clinging to life.


It is time to reflect and grow up -- words matter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2016, 09:58 PM
 
9,646 posts, read 8,325,466 times
Reputation: 5899
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandsonik View Post
Sir, you know nothing of Rhode Islanders or how they regard their own conversational skills. You were just trying to make a sly insult, but are too cowardly to own it.
Speak for yourself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sandsonik View Post
I lived in Boston, worked in Boston, have friends in Boston but don't pretend to know how a Bostonian thinks or how they, enjoying masses, regard their conversational skills.
Why don't you ask them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sandsonik View Post
Every town has villages. You would hear the same from residents of Olneyville, Fox Point, Rumford, Darlington, Greene, Anthony, Fiskeville, Natick, etc. It's not a north/south thing.
Not my point. I said "more pronounced". People commonly say they live in Providence, or are from Warwick, or Pawtucket. North or South Kingstown, much less so. More often "I'm from Wickford"... Of course there are exceptions like Narragansett.

Do you have some sort of alert for whenever I post, that you must come out and pick a fight? Just ain't feeling it tonight...

Quote:
Originally Posted by sandsonik View Post
Why don't you tell them you're from Seekonk? It's been a long, long time since you lived in Boston, hasn't it?
Because I'm not. 20 years removed, 20 more years I will still be "from" the same place...

Comprende?


Good to know your concern, though.

Last edited by massnative71; 06-19-2016 at 11:07 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2016, 04:55 AM
 
2,673 posts, read 1,672,643 times
Reputation: 1043
Quote:
Originally Posted by QuilterChick View Post
Yes, such as Oaklawn in Cranston; also Diamond Hill, or Arnold Mills,which are popular areas in Cumberland. There are several other small recognizable older areas in RI that people identify with. Western Cranston is another, only because it is a higher income area within Cranston itself which is usually considered lower income, such as Edgewood in Cranston. The Riverside area of East Providence, or Kent Heights, are other examples. RI has these quirky little areas that are not towns, just areas that have their own identity within a city or town.
Also, most towns have older areas with real character and new newer areas where character is hard to come by - regardless of resident income. For example, there are people who would love to live in Edgewood & Pawtuxet Village who wouldn't even consider much of the rest of Cranston or Warwick (and probably visa versa). Same with Rumford or the Terrace compared to much of the rest of East Providence. Fruit Hill in North Providence and Winsor Road in Johnston also come to mind for their distinct character. As do the North End & Winter Court in Woonsocket.

It is difficult to find any town in Rhode Island which doesn't have at least small pockets of character & beauty. It's indeed these "quirky little areas" within many otherwise less interesting suburbs that relieve much of the numbing sameness which would otherwise dominate our landscape.

Last edited by independent man; 06-20-2016 at 05:12 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2016, 12:05 PM
 
1,594 posts, read 1,687,168 times
Reputation: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
Speak for yourself.

I was, just like you were when you said Rhode Islanders don't enjoy intelligent conversation. Oh, wait...


Ha ha, I get it!


Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
Why don't you ask them.

I may, but I won't presume to speak for them on the Boston board, because that would be, you know, presumptious.


Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
Because I'm not. 20 years removed, 20 more years I will still be "from" the same place...

Comprende?


Good to know your concern, though.
I really wasn't busting your chops with that question. I assumed if a Maine person asked where you, an out of stater, came from, you would say Seekonk the place of your last residence as the place you came from. I was surprised to hear you answer with the place you left for greener pastures years ago.


But see, even in that there's an example. My answer would have been Hyde Park, not Boston. <G> The Rhode Island tendency to cut things into smaller bites.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2016, 01:37 PM
 
Location: chepachet
1,304 posts, read 2,439,787 times
Reputation: 647
Quote:
Originally Posted by independent man View Post
Also, most towns have older areas with real character and new newer areas where character is hard to come by - regardless of resident income. For example, there are people who would love to live in Edgewood & Pawtuxet Village who wouldn't even consider much of the rest of Cranston or Warwick (and probably visa versa). Same with Rumford or the Terrace compared to much of the rest of East Providence. Fruit Hill in North Providence and Winsor Road in Johnston also come to mind for their distinct character. As do the North End & Winter Court in Woonsocket.

It is difficult to find any town in Rhode Island which doesn't have at least small pockets of character & beauty. It's indeed these "quirky little areas" within many otherwise less interesting suburbs that relieve much of the numbing sameness which would otherwise dominate our landscape.
Oaklawn, Diamond Hill, Anthony, Rumford, Natick and others that were mentioned were legitimate towns/villages that acted as the center of commerce, retail, government and transport. They were not areas as Western Cranston, Edgewood, Narragansett Terrace and Western Coventry are defined. These areas had no identity as population centers as does Fiskeville (Western Cranston), Summit and Greene (Western Coventry). These towns/villages were the identifying locations. When Scituate had its many villages (Kent, So. Scituate, No. Scituate, Hope, etc. the villages were the identifiers. Much like Burrilville still is today with its Mohegan, Nasonville, Glendale, Mapleville, Oakland, Brighton, Wallum Lake, Pascoag and Harrisville. I think I have all of them. No one says I live in Burrilville and try sending a letter to Burrilville. It is not going to happen. In my own town of Glocester there is now but one village, Chepachet. Harmoiny used to have a town but the widening of 44 destroyed it as Greenville was destroyed also at the same time. There is a Western Glocester, but it is an area never having a village by the same name. Yet there was a village long ago called Clarksville along Pulaski Road. If one was from Arnold Mills, they would proudly reply "I am from the town of Arnold Mills" not the area of Arnold Mills and the name Cumberland would have never been mentioned. Much has been lost over the years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Rhode Island
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top