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Old 05-16-2019, 11:09 PM
 
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This is really interesting. There was a major discovery at the Omega Laser of a new phase of water. And it could solve the mystery of what is in the core of the gas giant planets.

Pretty neat seeing this discovery and research right in our back yard.

Quote:
RECENTLY AT THE Laboratory for Laser Energetics in Brighton, New York, one of the world’s most powerful lasers blasted a droplet of water, creating a shock wave that raised the water’s pressure to millions of atmospheres and its temperature to thousands of degrees. X-rays that beamed through the droplet in the same fraction of a second offered humanity’s first glimpse of water under those extreme conditions.


The x-rays revealed that the water inside the shock wave didn’t become a superheated liquid or gas. Paradoxically—but just as physicists squinting at screens in an adjacent room had expected—the atoms froze solid, forming crystalline ice.

“You hear the shot,” said Marius Millot of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, and “right away you see that something interesting was happening.” Millot co-led the experiment with Federica Coppari, also of Lawrence Livermore.

The findings, published this week in Nature, confirm the existence of “superionic ice,” a new phase of water with bizarre properties. Unlike the familiar ice found in your freezer or at the north pole, superionic ice is black and hot. A cube of it would weigh four times as much as a normal one. It was first theoretically predicted more than 30 years ago, and although it has never been seen until now, scientists think it might be among the most abundant forms of water in the universe.

Across the solar system, at least, more water probably exists as superionic ice—filling the interiors of Uranus and Neptune—than in any other phase, including the liquid form sloshing in oceans on Earth, Europa and Enceladus. The discovery of superionic ice potentially solves decades-old puzzles about the composition of these “ice giant” worlds.
https://www.wired.com/story/a-bizarr...-the-universe/
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Old 05-18-2019, 05:31 AM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
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That's extremely (I'll use a different adverb than you did to keep it, um, interesting) interesting; thanks for posting
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Old 05-18-2019, 06:01 AM
 
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There is an abundance of knowledge and talent here. Why we keep it a secret, I don't understand.
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Old 05-18-2019, 06:50 AM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
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Originally Posted by JWRocks View Post
There is an abundance of knowledge and talent here. Why we keep it a secret, I don't understand.
To be fair, this particular experiment was led by visiting Californians...the article doesn't actually mention anyone based in Rochester. Not sure if there was any collaboration from 'locals' beyond granting permission to use the facility to the Cal-Berkeley-based scientists...surely there were functionaries on hand, but
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Old 05-18-2019, 11:40 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Matt Marcinkiewicz View Post
That's extremely (I'll use a different adverb than you did to keep it, um, interesting) interesting; thanks for posting
Not a problem! It is a really neat discovery for sure
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Old 05-18-2019, 11:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Matt Marcinkiewicz View Post
To be fair, this particular experiment was led by visiting Californians...the article doesn't actually mention anyone based in Rochester. Not sure if there was any collaboration from 'locals' beyond granting permission to use the facility to the Cal-Berkeley-based scientists...surely there were functionaries on hand, but
I probably should have posted a different article that was a bit more clear Matt But the University Of Rochester team was definitely an equal partner on the project.

This articles shows it a bit more clear.

Quote:
Yes, according to new research from University of Rochester scientists. The Rochester researchers, along with their colleagues at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, used lasers at Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) to flash-freeze water into an exotic water ice phase. Using X-ray diffraction, they were able to identify and record, for the first time, the ice’s atomic structure. Their research, published in the journal Nature, may give more insight into the interior structures of giant planets in our galaxy.

“Icy giants like Uranus and Neptune consist of about two-thirds water by mass,” says Ryan Rygg, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and of physics and a senior scientist at the LLE, who worked on the project. “I expect the experimental confirmation of this exotic phase of water will push planetary scientists to overhaul their picture of the interiors of these planets.”

In 1998, scientists first predicted that water would transition to an exotic state when it was subjected to extreme pressures and temperatures—similar to the conditions that exist in planets such as Uranus and Neptune. In 2018, the Rochester and Livermore team presented the first experimental evidence for this exotic state of water, known as superionic ice, that is simultaneously a solid and a liquid because it is composed of oxygen atoms in a solid crystalline lattice and liquid-like hydrogen. However, the team was only able to observe general properties of the ice, such as temperature and energy.

Now, using laser-driven shockwaves and X-ray diffraction, the researchers not only created superionic ice, but recorded images of the microscopic crystalline structure of water in the superionic ice phase—all in a few billionths of a second.

“We wanted to determine the atomic structure of superionic water,” says Federica Coppari, a physicist at Livermore. “But given the extreme conditions at which this elusive state of matter is predicted to be stable, compressing water to such pressures and temperatures and simultaneously taking snapshots of the atomic structure was an extremely difficult task, which required an innovative experimental design.”
https://www.technology.org/2019/05/1...id-and-liquid/
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Old 05-18-2019, 12:31 PM
 
2,302 posts, read 1,659,485 times
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Originally Posted by Matt Marcinkiewicz View Post
To be fair, this particular experiment was led by visiting Californians...the article doesn't actually mention anyone based in Rochester. Not sure if there was any collaboration from 'locals' beyond granting permission to use the facility to the Cal-Berkeley-based scientists...surely there were functionaries on hand, but

Well, the equipment is here, and I understand about 300 people work there, so it makes sense that a lot of locals were involved.




Remember a short while back they found a nuclear reactor in the basement of Kodaks Research Labs?
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Old 05-18-2019, 01:05 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JWRocks View Post
Well, the equipment is here, and I understand about 300 people work there, so it makes sense that a lot of locals were involved.




Remember a short while back they found a nuclear reactor in the basement of Kodaks Research Labs?
Similarly when gravity waves were first detected for the first time ever, RIT was very much involved in that amazing discovery. While in this case the actual experiment was not done here in Rochester, RIT researchers were the first to create a computer simulation that the eventual physical experiment exactly matched.

RIT researchers were on the LIGO team that eventually made the discovery and the paper that announced the amazing discovery included RIT authors and RIT was prominently referenced because of its simulations.
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