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Old 07-09-2008, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 9,127,060 times
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Quote:
Please remember that you do not own the cattle; they own you.
Just make sure you don't have a bull that can jump (or go through) any kind of fence or pen you build...
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Old 07-09-2008, 08:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
The farm I lived on had a couple of windmills. The shallowest one was only 50 ft deep and didn't seem to be going down. Of course, we didn't pump during the winter, since we put the cattle back in the "shinery," we called it -- just short oak that cattle could eat when there was no grass. The stuff was poisonous during the spring, but we had something else for them to eat by then.

We also had a man-made pond which I'd recommend. It would keep rainwater for quite a while, unless we had a dry spell. But, if we had put a windmill there, it would've kept water. All of the windmills had tanks, though I imagine they could be rigged for overflow.

We only had to move once, though, which was around 1954. That was a serious drought. I was just a tot, then, and the family had to move to a city where my dad kept us fed and sheltered from selling cars. I don't know what he did with the cattle. He might've sold them to a nearby ranch. I never thought to ask.

BTW, there are a lot of farms that raise peaches, watermelons, pecans, and all kinds of vegetables to supplement their incomes. You usually see them on the side of the highway. They seem to be common in some areas but not in others.
Wells have changed a lot since 1954!!! They can pump any amount you want. Mine pumps 100 gallons a minute but, I use lots of water.
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Old 07-09-2008, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Ha, the windmills around here haven't changed in decades. I just read a newspaper story about a guy who repaired windmills. He said he didn't have to worry about parts, because they all had the same parts. But these windmills were just for cattle, not irrigation. When you are dry farming, and a lot of farmers dry farm, sometimes things can sometimes be a little iffy. For the most part, we did pretty well.

The thing about good crops is that sometimes you can have a bumper crop and still lose money. If everybody else has a bumper crop of cotton, say, then there tends to be a surplus, which drives the price down. These days, there is a huge demand for corn and other grains, so farmers are cutting back on cotton. Then, they'll make less cotton, driving the price up on it, and they can still make good money from grains.
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Old 07-10-2008, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
Just make sure you don't have a bull that can jump (or go through) any kind of fence or pen you build...
Hi Brian.Pearson,

I love your posts! It sounds like you have a really positive attitude and know how to get by in hard times. A water shortage doesn't seem to be problem right now in Missouri, as a matter of fact, they already are only a few inches away from their yearly total, in the Springfield area. Raising cattle in your climate must have been challenging. How many acres/animal unit in your area? What breed of cattle did you raise? ~ ~ Tambre

Last edited by tambre; 07-10-2008 at 06:07 AM.. Reason: wrong art work
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Old 07-10-2008, 08:45 AM
 
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Originally Posted by tambre View Post
Hi Brian.Pearson,

A water shortage doesn't seem to be problem right now in Missouri, as a matter of fact, they already are only a few inches away from their yearly total, in the Springfield area.
This year is definitely not the norm. We are usually dying from heat and lack of rain by now.
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Old 07-10-2008, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
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Originally Posted by Silvermouse View Post
This year is definitely not the norm. We are usually dying from heat and lack of rain by now.
Guess you should have a great hay crop this year. We visited last July and it was green and beautiful. Missouri is like heaven to me. Do you have alot of drought out there? Maybe those windmill waterers would be a good idea?
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Old 07-10-2008, 11:33 AM
 
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Originally Posted by tambre View Post
Guess you should have a great hay crop this year. We visited last July and it was green and beautiful. Missouri is like heaven to me. Do you have alot of drought out there? Maybe those windmill waterers would be a good idea?
They are typically on 2" wells.
You need a 5" PVC to pump enough water. (or bigger)
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Old 07-10-2008, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Oh, I forgot about the cattle my dad ran. At first, he had Herefords with an Angus bull. Later, he got the idea of having Angus with a Charolais bull. The idea behind that was that with this breed of bull, the calves would grow bigger and faster since Charolais are bigger.

I don't really know what the acreage/animal was. He usually had plenty of grass, whatever he decided to plant. He planted some hi-gear, one or two years and that grew quite a bit. Sometimes he had wheat and sometimes rye. But with oats, we had to be a bit more vigilant, since cattle were more likely to be bloated. One year, we saw a cow lying down, and we could immediately tell it had a serious bloat problem. We had to get the vet to punch a hole in its stomach to relieve the pressure.

In all, counting pasture with mesquite trees, farmland, and the 'shinery' I mentioned, we had two and a half sections. So, at one time or another, the cattle would see all of it. If we had two bulls (and this was usually the case), we'd have two herds and we kept them separated. But we didn't really run as many as possible, so there was no worry about acreage per animal.
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Old 07-10-2008, 09:15 PM
 
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This is a little off-topic but, one of the most exported thing from the US to Iran was bull semen. It was in the millions range.
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Old 07-11-2008, 04:58 AM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
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Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
This is a little off-topic but, one of the most exported thing from the US to Iran was bull semen. It was in the millions range.

Weapons of mass reproduction, lol, (sorry couldn't help myself.) Maybe we should stop selling it to them unless they drop the price of oil.

Last edited by tambre; 07-11-2008 at 05:01 AM.. Reason: thought of a better word
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