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Old 08-16-2011, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Des Moines, IA
219 posts, read 623,925 times
Reputation: 80

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Hi everyone. My moving date just keeps getting closer and closer. Though I have visited several cities in the past year, my decision still rests with Sacramento. Moving from Des Moines, I don't want a monumental change such as SF or LA. Sacramento actually reminds me a lot of Des Moines, perhaps with a bit more going on but a bit more crime to go along with it. My main concern now is finding the perfect neighborhood to live in. I've heard a lot of good things about Midtown and was wondering if anyone could help me confirm or disconfirm the information I've been given.

I've been told that this is one of the safest neighborhoods in Sacramento proper. (I do not want to live in the burbs.) I've also been told that it's the most exiting part of town as far as shops, restaurants, bars, etc. I am in my mid-twenties, have a college degree and several years experience as well as two health care licenses. I am hoping to find a job nearby perhaps as a home health aide or certified med aide. Are there many good health care jobs around that area, or in Sacramento in general?

My price range is around 700 to 850 and I would like to rent a nice one bedroom apartment. How feasible is this in Midtown? I've heard good things about East Sac, too, and would also consider living there. What can you tell me about the neighborhood specifically safety-wise. Is it wise to have an apartment that isn't on the ground floor? Are car break-ins quite frequent? Thank you all for your help and I appreciate any feedback!
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Old 08-16-2011, 10:15 PM
 
8,673 posts, read 17,279,161 times
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I don't think it is one of the safest neighborhoods in the region, but it's far from the most dangerous. Much of the crime in the neighborhood is related to the presence of lots of bars and entertainment venues: drunk driving, drunk & disorderly behavior and vandalism, fights, and car break-ins. But generally if you're farther than two blocks from any bars (what I like to call "puke radius" you don't really notice them. And if you're going to be visiting bars and clubs anyhow, it's nice being able to walk home.

Lots of healthcare jobs in this neck of the woods--Sutter Hospital is located on the eastern edge of Midtown and occupies a huge complex, Mercy Hospital and UC Davis Medical Center (the county hospital and a medical school) are about a mile east in East Sacramento and Elmhurst. Considering that you probably want to be close to these jobs, and because it's a bit quieter, I would recommend looking at the neighborhoods on the eastern edge of the central city (like New Era Park, Marshall School, Capitol Mansions, Winn Park or Newton Booth) or the western edge of East Sacramento (McKinley Park, the "Thrifty Thirties," or the Alhambra Triangle.) The rent amount is a bit low but probably manageable if you look around for a while.
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Old 08-17-2011, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Sacramento CA
1,342 posts, read 2,066,671 times
Reputation: 295
I am pretty new to the area, but I am gonna give you my honest opinion still. If you are a materialistic person who wants boobjobs and watches reality tv a lot, then yes come to Midtown. If you want to meet nicer people, go to the closer outskirts of the city I would say (maybe Arden Arcade). You don't want to be too far from things though or you will be in Exurbia. I don't think you want that at all.

Pros: Nice neighborhoods, safe overall, many restaurants (not all are uppity, just the midtown uptown places mostly), no humidity but it is too hot in the daytime.

Cons: Possibly bad air quality (I got sick twice here so far and if you have allergies, well..) , integration to the max, no truly good nearby flea markets, city has no true identity. You will need a car no matter where you live here even if its Midtown.

The funny thing is you are listed from Des Moines. I was thinking about that today when I was walking in Sacramento. I was thinking how Sac was probably Californias version of Des Moines since it does seem bland with no true identity other than being known for its central locale.
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Old 08-17-2011, 12:43 AM
 
1,348 posts, read 2,857,416 times
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I don't see how Sacramento resembles Des Moines. Sure, Sac's probably not the most exciting city in the world, but it's diversity along ensures that it's a very different city from Des Moines.

Sacramento has an identity. It's just not as well known as it's neighbors like LA and SF. Sac's identity is being a laid back, tolerant, diverse city. That's it's identity. Sacramento is also a place where people come together to make policies, a working class town but still with an intellectual heartbeat, a big city with a humble attitude.
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Old 08-17-2011, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Sacramento CA
1,342 posts, read 2,066,671 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sacramento916 View Post
I don't see how Sacramento resembles Des Moines. Sure, Sac's probably not the most exciting city in the world, but it's diversity along ensures that it's a very different city from Des Moines.

Sacramento has an identity. It's just not as well known as it's neighbors like LA and SF. Sac's identity is being a laid back, tolerant, diverse city. That's it's identity. Sacramento is also a place where people come together to make policies, a working class town but still with an intellectual heartbeat, a big city with a humble attitude.
You got some of this right. Sacramentos identity is that of a laid back and tolerant place. If you're openly racist though? It remains to be seen if people throw the book hard at you or just look at you funny without saying anything or if they do say something, they'll mention your mom or something or call you a retard or the "you can't get laid" reference.

Also yes Des Moines is not as integrated.

Sacramento is a working class town indeed in many places other than deep Midtown. I will give you that one. Arden Arcade sure seems to be and even parts of East Sacramento too. Rancho Cordova possibly. Roseville I heard wasn't so great in general. What I think will hurt Sacramento though is if they lose the kings. Since the population is growing here, it makes more sense to bring in more pro teams, NOT lose them. I do know Sac is projected to have way more people in 10 yrs. The cost of living will be astronomical then.
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Old 08-17-2011, 01:15 AM
 
1,348 posts, read 2,857,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoctorRain View Post
You got some of this right. Sacramentos identity is that of a laid back and tolerant place. If you're openly racist though? It remains to be seen if people throw the book hard at you or just look at you funny without saying anything or if they do say something, they'll mention your mom or something or call you a retard or the "you can't get laid" reference.

Also yes Des Moines is not as integrated.

Sacramento is a working class town indeed in many places other than deep Midtown. I will give you that one. Arden Arcade sure seems to be and even parts of East Sacramento too. Rancho Cordova possibly. Roseville I heard wasn't so great in general. What I think will hurt Sacramento though is if they lose the kings. Since the population is growing here, it makes more sense to bring in more pro teams, NOT lose them. I do know Sac is projected to have way more people in 10 yrs. The cost of living will be astronomical then.
In ten years, I think Sac's metro population will probably be around 2.7 million compared to 2.3 million now, though it's hard to predict due to the continued weakness in the economy.

I don't think Sac has much in common with most Midwestern cities. This is not a qualitative statement, just one based on demographics.

I do not see Sac's increase in population necessarily adding to rising living costs because Sacramento's city planners will probably do as they have continued to do for decades, build sprawl and build outwardly, which means we will have more ugly stucco suburbs with no character but cheap housing. Sac's surrounded by cheap flat land so it's difficult for real estate prices to be astronomical here, save for the central city.
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Old 08-17-2011, 01:44 AM
 
1,348 posts, read 2,857,416 times
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Also, I wanted to touch on something about Sac's identity more.

Sacramento is a major outdoorsy city. So if you are someone who loves the outdoors, Sacramento is a great place to be. The region stretches from the delta to the Sierras. It has two major rivers. The potential as far as outdoor activities, besides surfing, is endless.

Also, Sacramento is also a frontier city in many ways. It stretches from the urbanity of the Bay Area to the open wilderness of the Sierras. It was a major frontier city in the settling of the West and California and was the western terminus of the transcontinental railroad.
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Old 08-17-2011, 09:30 AM
 
8,673 posts, read 17,279,161 times
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Sacramento does have some things in common with a couple of Midwestern cities--like Chicago. Because we're a transportation-oriented place, like Chicago or St. Louis, located on rivers and later laced with railroad networks, we became a transportation nexus--part of the "two hours from where you'd rather be" moniker is because we're located specifically in a good place for moving things and people between regions! And because of that, we also got our original working-class cred, building things and shipping things. Like Chicago, which was built primarily on its massive slaughterhouses, grain mills and lumber industries, Sacramento was a place where people turned the products of farmers into something you could ship and sell across the continent. And key to one thing Sacramento916 said above--we were a frontier CITY, not a frontier town--the hub of a network, not an element of it. And part of why we got (and kept) the state capitol, despite our tendency to flood, is because we were in an ideal place to do statewide business--again, because of that transportation network.

Now, about Midtown (and, to be honest, a lot of the older suburbs around Midtown), it's the part of the region that most exemplifies that character, both in the built environment (the historic neighborhoods and the few remnants left of our old industries) and in people's attitudes. The suburbs are a lot more mellow, but like a lot of suburbs around the country, they lack much of the character. But, just as the residents of any outer urban area tend to turn their eyes to the nearest big-city downtown as a source of identity (or a source of scorn), Sacramento's central city plays that role quite well. We're a place to visit even for people who live here, and increasingly, a place where people live who want that sort of character all the time. The physical evidence is unavoidable--the river, the railroads (and the freeways) are all still here, along the old Southern Pacific shops (used to employ 25% of the city!) and a couple of canneries, one of which is still in operation (the Blue Diamond Almonds plant), the historic neighborhoods, and of course downtown and the Capitol.

A lot of the "Sacramento doesn't have an identity" crowd just don't happen to like its identity...or how multi-cultural and idiosyncratic it can be.
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Old 08-17-2011, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Des Moines, IA
219 posts, read 623,925 times
Reputation: 80
I want to live in a place where I can walk to a grocery store or to a restaurant or coffee shop. I live in the burbs of Des Moines and I hate having to drive miles to get to anywhere interesting. It just gets old. Sacramento reminded me a lot of DSM when I visited. A nice city.. not in your face exiting, but a nice central laid back place to be. Is East Sac a place where I could get these things? What about Arden/Arcade?
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Old 08-17-2011, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Des Moines, IA
219 posts, read 623,925 times
Reputation: 80
Also, WBurg, thank you for listing specific neighborhoods. That helps me a lot. I like your idea of living on the western edge of East Sac. Could anyone please tell me the average price of a NICE one bedroom apartment??
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