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Old 10-23-2006, 09:55 PM
 
890 posts, read 2,638,346 times
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SpencerLV, I don't know what your comfort zone is concerning traffic, but Roseville's is pretty bad at all hours. Weekends are the worst, but the commute times are equally horrible. And there is no relief in sight! The city has grown recently by a large land annexation that will add 25-35,000 new residents w/out any new roads/freeways. It's just your typical rapid-growth area governed by people who have little real concern for the city's residents. The only "unusual" aspect of the city, that sets it apart form thousands of other bland suburbs just like it, is that it has some history. It is a "raliroad town" and is currently the largest railyard in the Western U.S. Union Pacific runs things, but the town was built around the railroad, and exists because of it. There is a historic downtown area they are trying to revitalize, and some older homes in neighborhoods that are sort of mixed, in terms of crime and safety.
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Old 10-23-2006, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
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Roseville is the largest switching station west of the Mississippi or used to be. My parents grew up here, Dad used to own the local gas station and my aunt the local frosty. Both grandparents worked for the railroad and my cousin still works for it Needless to say, I have seen a BUNCH of changes over the years.

Traffic can be pretty crazy. You definately need to time your driving.

There is retail all over the area. There are a few regional malls, one being the Roseville Galleria. Folsom has some great big box complexes off of Hwy 50. We have Arden Fair Mall as well as Downtown Mall in Downtown Sacramento. There are a few exclusive retail areas in Roseville and Sacramento as well.

Sacramento Magazine also has some good information for people trying to get the lay of the land as far as retail etc.

Again, it just depends on what you want from the area.
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Old 10-24-2006, 01:09 AM
 
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Oh, did I forget to mention the noise from these huge locomotives, mostly freight trains, with cars running a mile long? If they are not blaring their train horns, then they are churning out diesel fumes, which is classified as a toxic carcinogen. Despite that, the growth has been tremendous, so I guess people don't care about that kind of stuff.
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Old 10-24-2006, 09:35 AM
 
Location: SMF
58 posts, read 225,681 times
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Default Trains

Thanks for the feedback, everyone. I saw several mentions of railroads, where are the most active, noisiest rail lines? i.e. most of the trains run through this suburb or that? I would imagine noise to be the primary issue, but also having to stop to wait for the trains to go by on a regular basis could be a nuisance.
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Old 10-24-2006, 03:56 PM
 
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The Union Pacific rail line runs through the middle of town in Roseville, and the train goes into Sac, so it passes other cities along the way (Roseville is about 20 miles NE of Sac). The city of Sacramento has instituted a "quiet zone" which means the engineers are not allowed to honk their train horns after a certain time at night, but some of them do anyway! Roseville has something similar, so it's not as bad as it used to be. Actually, unless you live within a 5 mile radius of a crossing, the noise isn't noticeable. The West area of the city is all new construction, and there are no tracks nearby. It's mainly through the older areas of town. You can find out more, and maybe get a map, if you Google it, or use another search engine. Another by-product of the rail I forgot to mention is the inordinate number of homeless people in Roseville. Many, if not most, arrive by rail. Some stick around, and some leave on another train. They mainly congregate in the downtown area, which is closest to the tracks, and the big railyard, but they also go to one of parks, or down by the creek, where they camp out. Roseville has had to deal with these "BoxCar Willies" (and Berthas!) for decades. They are a fact of life in a railroad town, but they are not indicative of the demographics of the area. Roseville is a very prosperous, up-and-coming town, so the number of transient homeless does not really reflect the city's economic character as it might in another city.
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Old 10-25-2006, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
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There are transients during the day by the railyard but they basically house them in the local older hotels to get them off the street. Its primarily in old downtown, the area wouldn't put up with them if they were all over.

I mean, unless you are living on Berry or Vernon Street, you have a tendency to not pay attention to the trains. Its not that bad. In 1971, now that was something that knocked my Mom out of bed. It was probably the only time that Roseville made the national news. There was a train that had unexploded ordinances from the Vietnam War that was going through the city (I am pretty sure that most of the legislation was done to prevent anything like this happening again - I hope). They exploded in the railyard.
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Old 10-25-2006, 06:37 PM
 
1,313 posts, read 5,957,655 times
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Seems like you've already figured out that there are a number of "Northern Californias". Both diversity and cost of living decline as you go either inland or to the north. So inland California to the north of Sac will be the most affordable. Don't go too far north (Shasta area) if you stay inland.

http://www.pbs.org/niot/citizens_respond/redding.html
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Old 10-25-2006, 07:15 PM
 
Location: SMF
58 posts, read 225,681 times
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Wow, I remember reading about this case back when it happened and couldn't believe it happened in California, of all places. Thanks for pointing it out; you're on the mark that most of us who are not from California are not familiar with the vast differences between the areas. Most of us have a stereotypical view that all of CA appreciates diversity and there aren't any... how do I put it... "Deliverance"-like areas. Hopefully, with the influx of more diversity from other areas, this sort of thing never happens in the Sacramento region.
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Old 10-25-2006, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
1,379 posts, read 6,007,267 times
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I think you will pretty much find intolerant and ignorant people everywhere. Geography doesn't stop stupid. You just have to be aware of your surroundings and I think that is why we all found this great site, so we can do our research so we can be around other like type people.

I for one am very glad to be able to go to a forum like this.
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Old 10-28-2006, 11:40 PM
 
1,313 posts, read 5,957,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guingirl View Post
I think you will pretty much find intolerant and ignorant people everywhere. Geography doesn't stop stupid.
I used to think that was true but a half-century of living in many different places in the West has convinced me that culture DOES have geographic boundaries. Different cultures have different levels of tolerance for certain aspects of human diversity. Many times, people with low basic life skills end up getting priced out of almost every housing market in a state save for a few, and "affordable areas" end up with a disproportionately high concentration of rednecks. Texas, Oregon, California...you see it all over. The opposite is perhaps more true: there are good people everywhere. But it's the same situation as with gangs: if minimizing contact with brutes is a high priority, there are identifiable "hot spots" one should avoid.
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