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Old 02-08-2020, 05:56 PM
 
4,345 posts, read 2,649,747 times
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I grew up in a middle class neighborhood in the northeast. The bulk of the houses were built in the 1960s: one floor ranches, raised ranches and full colonials. Some of the colonials had FOUR bedrooms and were considered extravagant. Those were typically owned by people with 6 kids with a large age spread.

3 bedrooms meant one for the parents, one for girls and one for boys. No one thought twice about sharing rooms. We were lucky with 1.5 baths, and because we had a raised ranch we eventually had a second half bath in the basement.

My current house is 1250 sq ft with 1 full bath. The original owners raised 3 kids here. I wouldn't mind a slightly bigger house, though if I had an outbuilding or two, I could move my woodworking stuff out there and clear up other space.
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Old 02-08-2020, 06:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
Older home are not energy efficient, you might need to redo them. My moms house is very cold, my brother went to New York for medical school and he said it’s much warmer in NY for him.

Depends on how old the home is. If built before about 1940 it's probably pretty energy efficient if properly maintained, because energy was expensive back then and they didn't have air conditioning so had to use passive cooling techniques. Homes built from the 40s to about 2000 were lousy for energy efficiency because energy was cheap and requirements for insulation etc were pretty minimal. New houses use a lot of insulation & things like CA Title 24 standards reduced energy usage. It's pretty simple & cheap to insulate older houses, add interior storm windows, fix up the wood windows, and put back passive energy saving features like insulating curtains & awnings, tree cover for shade, etcetera.
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Old 02-08-2020, 07:02 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
84,587 posts, read 77,766,850 times
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Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
I grew up in a 3 bedroom, 1.5 bathroom house like that built in 1951 on a slab in Phoenix.

The 3 boys shared a bedroom with bunk beds and the 2 girls had the other bedroom. We had one 40 gal water heater. We learned how to share.

Our living room had one 19 inch monochrome TV with a rabbit ear antenna. There were 4 channels. We had one AM radio and one telephone with a long cord.

We spent most of the time being feral children riding bikes, exploring, playing games, and solving our own problems. Our "Google" was a trip to the public library or reading the World Book Encyclopedia.

We had one car that dad drove to work. Mom spent the day cleaning and cooking. We walked or rode bikes everywhere.

There were few processed foods beyond Campbell soups and a McDonalds hamburger was a very rare treat. Almost nobody was fat.

In summer we went barefoot. We had no AC, just a swampbox cooler.

By todays standards, we would be called poor but we didn't know that.

Modern Americans work way too hard to buy a lot of stuff that they really don't need.
Who bought groceries, or when was grocery shopping done and trips to the pharmacy, if dad took the car to work? How did kids get to the doctor on days they were home sick, or to the dentist? In my family, dad took the bus to work, and the car stayed home with mom, so she could do the shopping, take kids where they needed to go after school, and run other errands as needed.
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Old 02-08-2020, 08:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Who bought groceries, or when was grocery shopping done and trips to the pharmacy, if dad took the car to work? How did kids get to the doctor on days they were home sick, or to the dentist? In my family, dad took the bus to work, and the car stayed home with mom, so she could do the shopping, take kids where they needed to go after school, and run other errands as needed.
My grandparents walked to work. My grandmother didn't drive at all, so she took the bus to shop, or doctors. They probably had a local corner market for quick shopping. They had one car.

My parents had two cars, so mom had one to get around when she needed to.
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Old 02-08-2020, 08:25 PM
 
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Mom grocery shopped at night and doctor appointment was the bus or walking. Kids walked to school. One bathroom for 5 people.
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Old 02-09-2020, 03:59 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
5,593 posts, read 5,771,903 times
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Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Who bought groceries, or when was grocery shopping done and trips to the pharmacy, if dad took the car to work? How did kids get to the doctor on days they were home sick, or to the dentist? In my family, dad took the bus to work, and the car stayed home with mom, so she could do the shopping, take kids where they needed to go after school, and run other errands as needed.
Mom did grocery shopping on Saturday. One full cart of groceries was about $25. She had to stretch the food budget. For example, she bought powered milk to mix and stretch the milk supply. Most meals involved noodles, rice, or potatoes. Meat was usually a cheap cut of beef cooked for hours as a roast and loaded with potatoes and various vegetables and Campbell soups for flavor. She made most meals from fresh vegetables and basic components. We never had frozen food or processed food. None of us were fat.

During the week I'd ride my bike with its basket to the Mayfair market to buy a quart of milk or a loaf of bread as required. All transactions were cash and I'd always bring the change home.

Doctor visits were very rare but on those days my father would catch a ride with a friend to free up the car.

One wonderful thing about living that way as a child is that I learned how to be frugal and I learned how to be self sufficient, solve my own problems, and how to learn. These skills helped enormously to deal with life. I have always been confident and competent and I finished a wonderful 47 year career as an electrical engineer.

All of my siblings finished college, most with advanced degrees, and the standards of living for our kids was much better.

But I think the main lesson is that we can be happy with many fewer material things. When I graduated college on a Friday and drove from Tucson to Santa Clara, Ca. to start my job as an engineer in the following week, I had all of my worldly possessions in the back seat of my '62 VW. I was one happy kid!

When I received my first paycheck it was so much money that I didn't know what to do with it so I put most of it in savings.
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Old 02-09-2020, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
75,940 posts, read 88,823,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Who bought groceries, or when was grocery shopping done and trips to the pharmacy, if dad took the car to work? How did kids get to the doctor on days they were home sick, or to the dentist? In my family, dad took the bus to work, and the car stayed home with mom, so she could do the shopping, take kids where they needed to go after school, and run other errands as needed.
In our family with just one car, dad was part of a car pool or took the bus to work. Rarely did he have to take our car. But if he did we were fine with it. As for things like doctors and dentists, we happen to be raised in a era when many people didn't visit either very often. This pretty much carried over after we got married. One car, usually a car pool and if not, public transportation was either used by hubby or by us if necessary. I would plan the kids dentists and doctors appointments for the days I knew I would have the car. If one of them was so sick it was necessary to see the doctor that day (this was rare) we had neighborhood friends to help out. We always knew everyone in the neighborhood.

Now days we live such a different life, but back then we didn't suffer cause we didn't know any different and we adjusted to life. Hubby and I didn't have 2 cars until we had been married about 12 or 15 years.
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Old 02-09-2020, 10:22 AM
 
936 posts, read 922,251 times
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Well now I live in a tiny 500 square foot apartment so even a 900 square foot home with a garage would be luxurious to me :-)

BUT I don't want to spend a million bucks on a crap shack. I am seeing the symptoms of housing bubble now in sac.
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Old 02-09-2020, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
35,284 posts, read 16,314,476 times
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Originally Posted by mixxalot View Post
Well now I live in a tiny 500 square foot apartment so even a 900 square foot home with a garage would be luxurious to me :-)

BUT I don't want to spend a million bucks on a crap shack. I am seeing the symptoms of housing bubble now in sac.
I don't think there is a housing bubble. Here's a pretty good article about the housing market in Sac:
https://www.sacbee.com/news/business...240053313.html
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Old 02-09-2020, 10:54 AM
 
936 posts, read 922,251 times
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Prices are not bad outside of certain areas away from downtown Sac.
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