Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Sacramento
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-11-2023, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Marin County, CA
787 posts, read 644,423 times
Reputation: 869

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by pistola916 View Post
Sacramento is a poorly ran city like others have said.

They built SMF out in the fields. There is only one access point for travelers to enter the airport and that's through Interstate 5. The airport should have been built where the old Sleep Train Arena was at, right at the crossroads where I-5 and Business 80 meet, so there would have been multiple entrances. Maybe if the airport was closer we probably have light rail to the airport by now.

The Railyards is barely seeing development after decades of nothingness. Still waiting on the new I street bridge to break ground. Sacramento lost its chance at an MLS team, which means no new stadium. Really a black eye for the city.

The new Science Center is nice but does little to activate the area. There isn't any public transportation to get there. Plus not very walkable friendly if you want to go to the museum from downtown. They could have built it on one of those vacant lots on Capitol Mall near the Crocker Art Museum. There was a larger proposal for the museum but got downsized. The modern side of the museum looks tacky.

CSUS's location doesn't bother me much but I wish we had a UC Sacramento in the urban core. Or a private University like a USC, Stanford or USF type of school here.

K Street Mall still looks underwhelming. Boarded up storefronts, homelessness, hole in the ground parcels, etc.

The New Sacramento Convention Center renovation is half baked. Yes, big improvement on the K st and 15th St side, but the architect did very little to improve the look on the J St and 13 St side. It's an architectural disaster. Sacramento should demand the same standards and quality that SF, Denver or even Portland have. We shouldn't settle for sub par designs just because its Sacramento -- just look at all the 5- story residential projects popping up all over the central City. They all look the same.

And now the Sac Zoo is exploring moving to Elk Grove. You don't let a civic amenity move to the suburbs!

Anyway, at least the arena is nice.
By standards and quality of life in SF, do you mean all the fent overdoses, break-ins, hate crimes, rampant homeless, fog, falling apart infrastructure, and insane taxes and fees?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-11-2023, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Marin County, CA
787 posts, read 644,423 times
Reputation: 869
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticpearl View Post
People who defend what liberals have done to SF have zero perspective how bad it is in comparison to just about any other first world major city globally.

But then the wealthy in SF travel to Amsterdam or Vienna or Prague for vacation because of how nice those cities are. Then play dumb and act like they can’t compute the difference.

Never mind Moscow, major Eastern Europe cities, major Middle East cities, any sizable city across Asia, etc, are all far nicer, cleaner and safer than SF.

Best comparison to SF is probably what you see in South Africa.

Kiev right now is nicer and safer than SF.
Well said.

I actually had to stand up and give this a standing ovation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2023, 08:53 AM
 
1,447 posts, read 1,570,303 times
Reputation: 850
Sacramento does not have the appeal of European cities like Prague or Barcelona due to few tourist or architecture places fo fame that draw visitors.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2023, 11:12 AM
 
3,472 posts, read 5,263,802 times
Reputation: 3206
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
This begs the question--I don't mean to sound mean by saying this, but do you actually look for things to do in Sacramento, like consulting local media or websites, or do you just think about it and hope you remember something? Checking event listings at places like Sacramento365 can help if looking for events like festivals, while local media typically talks about local events and attractions. The local tourism bureau, Discover Sacramento, is pretty ho-hum and tends to mostly list things outside Sacramento, but even they can be helpful for things like downtown festival listings.



Presumably if one is visiting a city and looking for things to do, they're at least something of a "city buff," but there's plenty of nearby rural activities if that's more your thing--more on that in a bit. You correctly note that San Francisco plays heavily on its history, from the Mission era, the Presidio and the Gold Rush, the Barbary Coast period, cable cars and Chinatown and the earthquake, the 1915 Pan-Pacific International Exposition, and plays very heavily on its 1960s counterculture legacy and 1970s gay liberation movement history. Oddly enough, when Sacramento plays on its own history, some folks accuse us of being trapped in the past, or gripe about Old Sacramento, despite the fact that, quite frankly, tourists and visitors really like Old Sacramento, and part of why there are so many candy and T-shirt shops there is because tourist visitors really like candy and T-shirts, and you find them in the tourist district of any other city. Like so many things, such as not being able to find parking spaces downtown, they're a symptom of success that people still find a reason to complain about.


If you don't really know anything about Sacramento's history, maybe it's time to get educated on the subject! Sacramento is the home of the California State Railroad Museum, which is one of the best and most-visited railroad museums in the country, because Sacramento was the starting point for the Central Pacific Railroad, the first transcontinental railroad--construction began here and went east, where it met Union Pacific's construction crews in Utah. That project brought a workforce of 12,000 Chinese laborers to California, many of whom stayed, joining Chinese miners who had come out for the Gold Rush.


I assume you've heard of the Gold Rush, but it's another event that's big in local history--San Francisco largely plays on Gold Rush history based on things that happened here in the Sacramento area. They even named a lot of their streets after Sacramento businessmen and landowners of the Gold Rush era--Sutter, Brannan, Leidesdorff. While you're still in Old Sacramento, be sure to check out the Sacramento History Museum, at 101 I Street in Old Sacramento just west of the Railroad Museum, which covers the Gold Rush pretty extensively, as well as the growth of Sacramento into a city--most notably including its street raisings, where we protected the city from floods through levees, moving the American River north, and raising downtown Sacramento high enough to escape the worst floods. The museum does a great tour of some of the "underground sidewalk" spaces in Old Sacramento, although they existed all the way out to about 12th Street downtown.


On the other end of the old city limits is Sutter's Fort, another person you may have heard of or maybe visited in 4th Grade if you grew up here. While Sutter himself was not the best person (he was a second-rate con artist and serial failure who only succeeded briefly in Sacramento by terrorizing the indigenous people into what, while not technically slavery, was definitely a condition of servitude) it's an interesting place to visit to learn about early Sacramento--and don't miss the California Indian Museum, located behind the fort, a modest but well-organized museum that tells the story of what happened in the thousands of years before the arrival of Europeans in California. There's a plan underway to build a much larger museum dedicated to California's indigenous people in West Sacramento, but it's a few years away.


Sacramento also had streetcars (the mule-drawn and later electric kind, not the kind pulled by cables), but aside from light rail there isn't much to remind people of that. We also had a Chinatown, mostly demolished by 1960s era redevelopment and commemorated in a small 1970s Chinatown Mall created by local Chinese-American merchants working with the Redevelopment Agency, and designed by local Chinese-American architects. It hasn't fared well since COVID but there are plans to revitalize the place that just got started, so it may become a tourism attraction again--there used to be things like Lunar New Year events and other public gatherings in its sunken central courtyard.


Sacramento also used to have a Japantown, on what is now Capitol Mall, which was also the home of the local Black, Filipino, and Mexican communities, also displaced by redevelopment (aside from 2 buildings at 4th and O Street.) There are contemporary events recognizing these communities like the AAPI Night Market coming up next weekend on May 19, and on the other end of Capitol Avenue at the Sofia, this weekend is the Sacramento Asian Pacific Film Festival. Of course, those populations didn't disappear; many moved to the neighborhood of Southside Park, which was previously a Portuguese and Italian neighborhood (there's still a Portuguese Catholic church in Southside, but the Italian Catholic congregation moved to East Sacramento), which now has a Buddhist temple, a Muslim mosque (oldest in the western United States), the national shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe (a Spanish speaking congregation) and an African Methodist church whose congregation dates back to the Gold Rush (even if their old church was demolished for a county parking structure.) Southside Park has some legacy businesses associated with its role as a Japantown, including Osaka-ya, one of only a handful of traditional mochi & manju shops left in California, legendary for its Japanese style snow-cones, a mainstay of summer in Southside! There are also many cultural events, concerts, fairs, and other community gatherings in Southside Park itself, a historic city park well known for its mural-decorated Art Deco bandstand. Sacramento's Black population principally moved to Oak Park, Glen Elder, and Del Paso Heights near the formerly-separate city of North Sacramento (now a neighborhood of Sacramento), and there are celebrations and events in both places, along with art galleries and cultural hubs; a bit south from Oak Park is the Sojourner Truth African Heritage Museum which is part of a whole collection of Black owned businesses, nonprofits, and community service organizations in a marketplace located in a repurposed shopping center at 24th Street and Florin Road; they also have festivals and special events.


As others have mentioned, there are a lot of regional events recognizing regional agriculture and food processing, like the Farm-to-Fork Festival, or just weekly farmer's markets like the one in Midtown, which takes up about 5-6 city blocks every Saturday, along 20th Street between J Street and Capitol, and K Street from 19th to 21st! But there are also regional festivals out in the Delta in the summertime, like the Courtland Pear Fair, and other Delta towns like Locke (a Chinese farm town), Clarksburg (well known for its winery in an old sugar mill), Isleton, Walnut Grove, and others--great for a day trip, by car or by boat!


Coming back to Sacramento, this weekend marks the return of Second Saturday in Midtown, a monthly arts & culture event intended to draw visitors to Sacramento art galleries and creative spaces, which never really entirely went away, but shrank down considerably in 2020 for obvious reasons, and is now just one of several regular art events that happen in Sacramento--there are two separate First Friday art gallery events that happen in R Street downtown, focused on the "Warehouse Artist Lofts" building, and Oak Park along Broadway. But there are a whole lot of other festivals, fairs, art events, etcetera, in the central city pretty much every week especially in spring, summer, and fall, and more in other parts of town--and that's not even getting into special events or attractions farther east in the suburbs, which I'm less of an expert at. But seriously--do some exploring and check things out, don't just assume there's nothing going on. Once you know where to look for it, the only excuse for not having some sort of event to go visit is because you're too tuckered out from attending all the great events!
These are all great recommendations. I'm not sure that they would be huge tourist draws from outside of the area, but for locals, there is plenty to do and see. I suppose every midsize City works hard to offer similar things, but Sacramento really does have a unique combination of being a historically significant city, a state capitol, and an agricultural region. In many ways, Sacramento is the most quintessentially Californian city; by that I mean it's not part of the modern flashiness of the tech industry or Hollywood but rather feels like an organic, gradually developed City that grew out of everything that lured the first (non-native) people to California in the first place: fertile land, open space, a healthful climate, access to the beauty of nature. You can really see how Sacramento kept progressing steadily out of those 19th century roots, rather than being a place of new ideas and reinvention. And I think that's a very cool mix of history and modernity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2023, 01:08 PM
 
6,906 posts, read 8,275,166 times
Reputation: 3877
Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
These are all great recommendations. I'm not sure that they would be huge tourist draws from outside of the area, but for locals, there is plenty to do and see. I suppose every midsize City works hard to offer similar things, but Sacramento really does have a unique combination of being a historically significant city, a state capitol, and an agricultural region. In many ways, Sacramento is the most quintessentially Californian city; by that I mean it's not part of the modern flashiness of the tech industry or Hollywood but rather feels like an organic, gradually developed City that grew out of everything that lured the first (non-native) people to California in the first place: fertile land, open space, a healthful climate, access to the beauty of nature. You can really see how Sacramento kept progressing steadily out of those 19th century roots, rather than being a place of new ideas and reinvention. And I think that's a very cool mix of history and modernity.
TS, Yes valid comments, but I think you are missing something, Sacramento has always been part of Californians contributions to Tech, Aerospace, the Military, and Public policy and Politics, and California culture.

If only Hollywood ever addressed us as much as other medium size American cities and metros of the same size I'm sure Sacramento would be more well known for its contributions.

Hollywood and the media has always ignored or underrated what happens in the Sacramento region.

I think they do that for various reasons. Because of their sheer size, LA, the Bay Area and San Diego get all the attention and there is little energy remaining to discuss the Sacramento Metro. There is a disdain for Capitol cities, especially Capitol cities that dictate so much public policy like Sacramento. Sacramento is far removed from the energy of SoCal, even Phoenix and Vegas are closer to SoCal. There is an overemphasis of our Central Valley identity, we have always been so much more than just another Ag town in the Great Central Valley; in fact, Ag has always been just a small part of who we are.

Do you remember the Record Industry's impact on culture of the last 75yrs? Well, the most important Giant in that industry was Tower Records. Tower Records was a Sacramento company. It was started by a Sacramentan, and as the company grew from a drugstore in the 1940's to a Giant in the Record Industry, the owner kept his headquarters in Sacramento. Russ Solomon is the man, and you can visit one of his Record stores on the K Street Mall, The store was restored and reimagined into a Jewish style Restaurant, Full Bar and a Music Venue, Art Gallery, and Social Space. Only recently have they moved away from the traditional Jewish-American offerings to a more contemporary menu.

Check it out. Solomons - 7th and K Streets. There is also a documentary, "All Things Must Pass", about Tower Records.
The original Tower Records building and Theatre is on Broadway at Land Park Drive/16th Street.

Last edited by Chimérique; 06-12-2023 at 01:55 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2023, 04:28 PM
 
8,673 posts, read 17,282,794 times
Reputation: 4685
Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
These are all great recommendations. I'm not sure that they would be huge tourist draws from outside of the area, but for locals, there is plenty to do and see. I suppose every midsize City works hard to offer similar things, but Sacramento really does have a unique combination of being a historically significant city, a state capitol, and an agricultural region. In many ways, Sacramento is the most quintessentially Californian city; by that I mean it's not part of the modern flashiness of the tech industry or Hollywood but rather feels like an organic, gradually developed City that grew out of everything that lured the first (non-native) people to California in the first place: fertile land, open space, a healthful climate, access to the beauty of nature. You can really see how Sacramento kept progressing steadily out of those 19th century roots, rather than being a place of new ideas and reinvention. And I think that's a very cool mix of history and modernity.

What lured the first non-native people to California in the first place was the desire to get rich quick in the Gold Rush, either by digging up lots of gold or by selling outrageously priced goods and services to the gold miners--traditionally, the second method worked much more effectively than the first. Sacramento was hardly an example of gradual growth: we went from a remote Mexican outpost to the second largest city on the west coast in a couple years (with San Francisco doing the same, except they were an even older Mexican military outpost and became the largest city.) Then we became a center of technological innovation, when "high tech" industry meant steam-powered railroads and long-distance telegraph lines; we had the first railroad in the west, then built the first transcontinental railroad during the era when railroading was basically "big tech" of its day--exciting, technologically advanced (the SP Shops produced a huge list of patents & inventions), drawing huge investment and excitement, and causing huge amounts of economic chaos (it was far more profitable to start a railroad than to operate a railroad, and the two biggest economic crashes of the late 19th Century, the Panic of '73 and the Panic of '93 were both attributable to overextended railroad investors causing the booming market to bust.)



New ideas and reinvention were basically a Sacramento brand starting after the 1893 panic and the Pullman Strike, which paralyzed the state transportation network from the Southern Pacific Shops; Sacramento businessmen tried multiple times to reinvent the city after the housing market bubbles resulting from Santa Fe RR entering the LA and Oakland markets bumped Sacramento from the 2nd biggest city in the state to 3rd and then 4th. Instead of being an industrial city with its industrial workers, Sacramento tried to tie its future to a mostly-mythical agricultural legacy based on John Sutter rebranded as an agricultural visionary and not a second-rate con man. And even as Sacramento repositioned itself as a post-WWII center for state and federal employment and Cold War military/aerospace contracting to get away from association with its immigrant/labor-heavy past, local boosters stuck to the "farm town" mythology as a way to attract GIs looking for a quiet place to settle down in new subdivisions that the fertile land around Sacramento was bulldozed to build. One of the little-known side effects of that transition was that, in the 1970s, we were one of the national hubs for Star Trek fandom! Even today, the "Farm to Fork" thing is mostly an effort to leverage the farm-town myth, even as it elides association with the migrant workers who do the labor, just as "Old Sacramento" makes little reference to its former role as the great hiring hall for Californian industrial agriculture (prior to I-5 and its tourist makeover, the area was the site where 25% of the hiring in CA migrant labor was done, with thousands of SRO rooms and a business district that catered to the needs of migrant laborers returning to Sacramento with full wallets and empty stomachs.)



The recommendations were intended as references for someone asking about not-so-well-known local attractions to a traveling friend, rather than assuming that any of them would turn into internationally acclaimed attractions (although the Railroad Museum definitely already has that status.) Many travelers visit cities to seek out their little-known attractions--sure, plenty of people visit LA with plans of going to Disneyland or Hollywood & Vine, but personally I find a visit to the Velveteria velvet-painting museum or Sawtelle Japantown a lot more interesting, even if they aren't advertised with colorful brochures at the airport. In Sacramento, we have fewer flashy attractions to obscure the real city, so people tend to assume that Old Sacramento's fragmented and disjointed view of local history is all there is to know about the place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2023, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
11,483 posts, read 6,002,443 times
Reputation: 22526
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chimérique View Post
B Street Theatre/Sofia Center

Crocker Art Museum

Sacramento Museum of Science and Curiosity

Music Circus

Standard Mansion/Museum

State Capitol and Capitol Park

Old Sacramento

Sacramento Zoo

Concerts, show, games at Golden 1 Center

Sacramento AAA Baseball Park (Sutter Health Stadium) for games and shows

Beyond the train museum, there is not a top tier tourist attraction in the entirety of Sacramento. Not a single "must see". The Museum of Science is a decent runner-up to the train museum, but neither a top tier or must see.

Professional sports do not make for a tourist town. Oklahoma City has pro basketball and is not a tourist town, despite a couple of nice little history museums.

I think you meant, the Leland Stanford Museum.

I will give you the B-Street theater and Music Circus. I enjoyed productions there many times.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2023, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Elk Grove, CA
580 posts, read 513,929 times
Reputation: 1099
I think people are over thinking this. Very few 3rd tier mid sized metros are tourist traps. I mean you got Vegas, New Orleans, and Orlando areas and that is really it.

I mean who do you know that takes a vacations to Salt Lake City, Columbus, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Baltimore, San Antonio, or St Louis for fun??

Honestly, 2nd tier regions like San Diego, Minneapolis, Denver, Portland, and such do have a bit more vibrancy/energy/amenities vs 3rd tiers like Sac. But 2nd tier regions are much closer to 3rd tiers than they are to 1st tiers.
San Diego or Portland is much closer to Sac than they are to The Bay, NYC, LA, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2023, 10:31 AM
 
927 posts, read 759,117 times
Reputation: 934
Darn I have to go back to Sacramento
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2023, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Elk Grove, CA
580 posts, read 513,929 times
Reputation: 1099
Quote:
Originally Posted by Igor Blevin View Post
Beyond the train museum, there is not a top tier tourist attraction in the entirety of Sacramento. Not a single "must see". The Museum of Science is a decent runner-up to the train museum, but neither a top tier or must see.

Professional sports do not make for a tourist town. Oklahoma City has pro basketball and is not a tourist town, despite a couple of nice little history museums.

I think you meant, the Leland Stanford Museum.

I will give you the B-Street theater and Music Circus. I enjoyed productions there many times.
That is what I have always told people. Sac has everything you need, just in a "one horse town" type of way. We do have a world class museum, it just happens to be trains.

Golden One can definitely be attributed to adding more tourism in Sac. And I am not talking about the Kings. The NCAA had games there this year, and it was packed with out of towners. More than I have ever seen in Downtown in 20+ years.

A lot of big name acts performing there now too. Comedians, musicians and all that. After shock is pretty much the largest rock festival on the west coast.

I will give credit where it is due. Sac has gotten a hell of a lot more interesting in the last 20 years. I was born in the mid 80's and my generation wanted to escape Sac for the city. Now these kids want to live on the grid when they get out of high school
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Sacramento

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top