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Old 10-26-2015, 04:08 PM
 
17 posts, read 21,970 times
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We are thinking of relocating to Corvallis or north of there from the East coast. When we visited Corvallis, we loved the friendliness of the people and sense of community, but were put off by the real estate situation.

We want to have a quiet home on a private acre or more but homes in town seemed to be primarily in suburban type developments one right next to the other.

We are looking in the $500K range. There were a few such homes available just outside of Corvallis when we looked last April, but the selection was quite limited and we were told that when such a home comes up it is goes so fast that we'd have to put an immediate offer on it and THEN arrange to come and see it if we were to have any hope of getting it.

Any information on this problem? Is the real estate situation getting better? Worse?
When I posted this thread on the Eugene forum someone suggested I add "north of Corvallis" and post it on the Salem forum.
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Old 10-26-2015, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
4,252 posts, read 6,461,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corvus_corax9 View Post
...........
When I posted this thread on the Eugene forum someone suggested I add "north of Corvallis" and post it on the Salem forum.
Corvallis is a city unto itself.

It is not a suburb of Eugene or of Salem.

It is not a part of the metropolitan area of Eugene or of Salem.

Corvallis questions should be posted in the general Oregon forum.
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Old 10-26-2015, 05:00 PM
 
4,060 posts, read 4,858,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karlsch View Post
Corvallis is a city unto itself.

True, though people post Corvallis questions in Eugene/Salem threads as well as the state forum. I'd suggest the OP post here mostly to get Silverfall's attention.
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Old 10-26-2015, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Portland Metro
2,300 posts, read 4,114,061 times
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What you are looking for is just not that abundant in Oregon. You call it "problem" and we just look at it as the reality of the real estate landscape here--that is, you just don't see many homes on acreage unless you are looking for farm or ranch land. Partly because of land use laws, we don't do subdivisions with 1-acre parcels like they do back east. And yes, when you do see a home available, they tend to get snatched up quickly.

There's no "getting better" or "getting worse" to it, other than it seems like there's a lot of demand right now. Your only option would be to wait until interest rates go up or something else causes the real estate market to tumble and for more inventory to come up for sale. Or you could move out here into some sort of temporary housing and then you would be more able to jump on a property when it goes on the market. But who wants to move twice, right?

And trust me, this will be just the beginning of things you'll have to get used to here in Oregon that are different from the east coast. If you really want to move, you might as well start embracing those differences rather than thinking of it as a "problem" or something wrong.
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Old 10-26-2015, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
14,700 posts, read 35,576,072 times
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ALL Oregon cities have urban growth boundaries (UGB). These are artificial lines drawn around each city. Development must occur within the boundaries. Once there begins to be a shortage of developable land, then and only then, can the boundary around the city expand. The reason Oregon does this is to preserve our farm and forestland.

So, you are asking for a small acreage parcel which aren't made anymore. Zoning outside of the UGB is done in two-acre parcels, like an AR-2 zone, AR-5, or farming zones such as SA, EFU, and FF. So really the only one acre parcels, with a few exceptions, that are left outside city boundaries are ones that were created before Senate Bill 100 which passed in 1975. As such, they are a rare thing. So it isn't that there is a problem. It is the way real estate is here so that we can preserve farmland.

I agree that there isn't a "north of Corvallis" as we have cities and then farmland here. So yes, if you want one of the few small acreage parcels that comes up for sale around Corvallis, that is a nice stick built home, then you would likely need to write an offer without seeing it. If you get the house, then fly out during the home inspection.
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Old 10-27-2015, 03:49 AM
 
17 posts, read 21,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjpop View Post
What you are looking for is just not that abundant in Oregon. You call it "problem" and we just look at it as the reality of the real estate landscape here--that is, you just don't see many homes on acreage unless you are looking for farm or ranch land. Partly because of land use laws, we don't do subdivisions with 1-acre parcels like they do back east. And yes, when you do see a home available, they tend to get snatched up quickly.

There's no "getting better" or "getting worse" to it, other than it seems like there's a lot of demand right now. Your only option would be to wait until interest rates go up or something else causes the real estate market to tumble and for more inventory to come up for sale. Or you could move out here into some sort of temporary housing and then you would be more able to jump on a property when it goes on the market. But who wants to move twice, right?

And trust me, this will be just the beginning of things you'll have to get used to here in Oregon that are different from the east coast. If you really want to move, you might as well start embracing those differences rather than thinking of it as a "problem" or something wrong.
What are the main differences that you had in mind ?
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Old 10-27-2015, 10:24 AM
 
4,060 posts, read 4,858,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corvus_corax9 View Post
What are the main differences that you had in mind ?
It's hard to find a Dunkin Donuts out here. For some people I know that alone would be a deal-breaker.
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Old 10-27-2015, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Salem, OR
14,700 posts, read 35,576,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bler144 View Post
It's hard to find a Dunkin Donuts out here. For some people I know that alone would be a deal-breaker.
Ha. Ha. When we were back in the DC area with our kids a couple of years ago, my son commented on all of the Dunkin Donuts shops everywhere.

The old Dunkin Donuts is Daynight Donuts now.
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Portland Metro
2,300 posts, read 4,114,061 times
Reputation: 2732
Quote:
Originally Posted by corvus_corax9 View Post
What are the main differences that you had in mind ?
People, government, tax system, infrastructure, entertainment opportunities.

But mostly living in a country in which the national media and government seem to think of the PNW as an afterthought. We ain't the eastern seaboard, Texas, or California.
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:57 AM
 
17 posts, read 21,970 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjpop View Post
People, government, tax system, infrastructure, entertainment opportunities.

But mostly living in a country in which the national media and government seem to think of the PNW as an afterthought. We ain't the eastern seaboard, Texas, or California.
Thanks for this. We have lived in Detroit, MN, San Diego, Providence, Chicago, LA, Boston, DC , Vermont, NC and have travelled many places.
We clearly felt the difference in people than the eastern seaboard . So, not being eastern seaboard, Texas or California is fine although there are places and people in those locations that are wonderful.

Could you comment more on what you had in mind in the areas of government, tax system, infrastructure ?
thanks
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