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Old 10-02-2010, 05:48 AM
 
Location: Ogden/Roy
23 posts, read 79,469 times
Reputation: 22

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Quote:
Originally Posted by openroadie View Post
Thanks for all the information given on the Ogden area. My husband and I are mid-50's and retired, and are so very tired of southern heat. My son lives in the Salt Lake City area, and we are going to coming out next spring to have a look around, and possibly house hunt. We aren't able to participate in a lot of the outdoor activities since my husband in a disable vet, but we can certainly enjoy the beauty! Would any of you have an opinion on what areas of Ogden is better to look for a home? I 'd love to hear from some of you. Any advice would be appreciated!
I'd look in North or South Ogden for a home. Central Ogden is a little more rundown but is in the process of being brought back up. However, above Harrison blvd, next to the mountain, you can find nice housing in central Ogden. Up close to the mountain is often referred to as "the bench" so if you see anything that says it's on the bench you'll know what it means.
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Old 10-07-2010, 09:46 AM
 
146 posts, read 462,032 times
Reputation: 104
I love Ogden and would live there no problem.

You can't really compare it to Salt Lake City though, SLC is a big city, Ogden is a smallish city.

Outdoor opportunities up the wazooo and smaller crowds so you aren't fighting for powder and lift lines are short.

Really nice people up there.

A few Park City quality restaurants at 2/3 the price.

It's a great little city.
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Old 12-23-2010, 11:43 AM
 
Location: ogden,ut
1 posts, read 1,630 times
Reputation: 10
i love ogden. i moved here from Portland and thought id hate it but there is so much to do.
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Old 12-23-2010, 04:53 PM
 
226 posts, read 528,818 times
Reputation: 179
Katzpur, you and I share a prejudice against Ogden that I think at one time (half a century ago) was probably deserved. We remember when it was a terribly run-down railroad town that was high crime and low rent, but on a travel-related website that I participate in, you'd be amazed at how many people from out of state prefer the Powder Mountain and Snowbasin resorts to Snowbird and Alta. And they speak of Ogden as being kind of like the nostalgic all-American town. Maybe it's turning around...
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Old 12-23-2010, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
24,957 posts, read 25,631,834 times
Reputation: 12026
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauka View Post
You can't really compare it to Salt Lake City though, SLC is a big city, Ogden is a smallish city.
Wow! When did Salt Lake City become a big city? A downtown area of perhaps six square blocks hardly qualifies as a big city in my opinion.
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Old 12-23-2010, 11:18 PM
 
12,054 posts, read 11,372,409 times
Reputation: 38423
Quote:
Katzpur, you and I share a prejudice against Ogden that I think at one time (half a century ago) was probably deserved. We remember when it was a terribly run-down railroad town that was high crime and low rent, but on a travel-related website that I participate in, you'd be amazed at how many people from out of state prefer the Powder Mountain and Snowbasin resorts to Snowbird and Alta. And they speak of Ogden as being kind of like the nostalgic all-American town. Maybe it's turning around...

You don't have that quite right. Ogden's heyday was probably a half century ago. When I complain about what the city has declined too that is what I am comparing it against.

Fifty years ago, Ogden was a vibrant community. From 22nd Street to 26th Street, stores, shops, and hotels lined both sides of the street. Christmas time was an incredible time because the whole downtown was flooded with people doing shopping. Police were often called to direct the traffic. One particular specialty were clothing stores. Perhaps, the most notable was the "Fred M. Nye Company". This store was located in a three story building. It had the very latest in fashions. The Ben Lomond Hotel was a very famous landmark. There was a coffee shop in the hotel called the "Top of the Town" where Ogden's business elite gathered to discuss matters. Other businesses that were present included the Egyptian Theater, Keeley's Cafe, the Orpheum Theater. The Ogden Standard Examiner, the daily newspaper, was thick and packed with advertising. Rainbow Gardens at the mouth of Ogden Canyon was a fun resort complete with swimming pools that many people went on Saturday.

Than, the railroad which was responsible for much of Ogden's development underwent a huge decline. By 1970, passenger trains had completely stopped running. The railroad laundry, the Union Pacific Fruit Express, and many companies which depended on the railroad closed. It had a huge economic impact. From 1970 to 1980 and 1980 to 1990, Ogden lost population. What was a vibrant blue collar community turned into a much poorer community with a large segment of retirees and people on government assistance.

The "run down" period began in about 1970 and has continued until quite recently. In the last five years, there have been some signs of hope. The new mall is slowly taking shape. A system of hiking trails is being built along the Ogden River. The Dinosaur Park was established. IRS built a brand new facility next to the railroad track. The coming of commuter rail has revitalized much of the area by the railroad tracks around 24th Street.

The greatest thing Ogden has going for it is the surrounding area. The mountains, forests, and ski resorts could make for tourism and some amazing recreational opportunities. Weber State University is important to the area as well. Unfortunately, Weber State will probably always be a bit smaller and less well funded than both the University of Utah and Utah State University.

Anyway, that's the correct story. You aren't completely wrong, but the problem with Ogden is that until revitalization is complete its best days will definitely appear to be those that occurred 50 years ago.
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Old 12-24-2010, 12:27 AM
 
202 posts, read 330,104 times
Reputation: 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
You don't have that quite right. Ogden's heyday was probably a half century ago. When I complain about what the city has declined too that is what I am comparing it against.

Fifty years ago, Ogden was a vibrant community. From 22nd Street to 26th Street, stores, shops, and hotels lined both sides of the street. Christmas time was an incredible time because the whole downtown was flooded with people doing shopping. Police were often called to direct the traffic. One particular specialty were clothing stores. Perhaps, the most notable was the "Fred M. Nye Company". This store was located in a three story building. It had the very latest in fashions. The Ben Lomond Hotel was a very famous landmark. There was a coffee shop in the hotel called the "Top of the Town" where Ogden's business elite gathered to discuss matters. Other businesses that were present included the Egyptian Theater, Keeley's Cafe, the Orpheum Theater. The Ogden Standard Examiner, the daily newspaper, was thick and packed with advertising. Rainbow Gardens at the mouth of Ogden Canyon was a fun resort complete with swimming pools that many people went on Saturday.

Than, the railroad which was responsible for much of Ogden's development underwent a huge decline. By 1970, passenger trains had completely stopped running. The railroad laundry, the Union Pacific Fruit Express, and many companies which depended on the railroad closed. It had a huge economic impact. From 1970 to 1980 and 1980 to 1990, Ogden lost population. What was a vibrant blue collar community turned into a much poorer community with a large segment of retirees and people on government assistance.

The "run down" period began in about 1970 and has continued until quite recently. In the last five years, there have been some signs of hope. The new mall is slowly taking shape. A system of hiking trails is being built along the Ogden River. The Dinosaur Park was established. IRS built a brand new facility next to the railroad track. The coming of commuter rail has revitalized much of the area by the railroad tracks around 24th Street.

The greatest thing Ogden has going for it is the surrounding area. The mountains, forests, and ski resorts could make for tourism and some amazing recreational opportunities. Weber State University is important to the area as well. Unfortunately, Weber State will probably always be a bit smaller and less well funded than both the University of Utah and Utah State University.

Anyway, that's the correct story. You aren't completely wrong, but the problem with Ogden is that until revitalization is complete its best days will definitely appear to be those that occurred 50 years ago.
you do realize that your description of ogden's trajectory over the past 50 years probably is exactly the same for many mid-sized town/cities in america?
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Old 12-24-2010, 09:15 AM
 
313 posts, read 867,677 times
Reputation: 228
Utahroots, what ski related site were you talking about?

I love Snowbasin and Powder Mountain and would love to share my experiences there.
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Old 02-27-2011, 01:01 PM
 
8 posts, read 19,610 times
Reputation: 24
Real estate in Ogden is a lot cheaper than in SLC.
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