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Old 02-12-2011, 10:05 PM
 
53 posts, read 110,202 times
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Hello, my family & I are moving to SLC here shortly & I've heard the best places to live are Sugarhouse or the Avenues. What I want to know are these places like a Scottsdale in Arizona where all the people are plastic or trying to keep up with the Jones & not really genuine people?

We currently live in Chandler & would like to find a place where it's not as important as to what you drive or how much money you make.

Thanks.
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Old 02-12-2011, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
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The 2 areas are nothing like Scottsdale where everyone is the same economic class. Both areas have wealthy, middle-class, and somewhat poorer residents. Both are old areas with no subdivisions/HOAs, no consistency in appearance.
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Old 02-13-2011, 10:01 AM
 
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Thanks for your reply. So another question about those areas are there bad areas mixed in with the good? I know here in Arizona, we have multi-million dollar homes and then you go a block away and there are really bad areas where you wouldn't dare walk around by yourself.

Just curious.
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Old 02-13-2011, 10:59 AM
 
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There is greater economic disparity in the Avenues than in Sugarhouse with some truly expensive homes in the upper Avenues and more older/smaller homes and apartment buildings in the lower Avenues. But at the same time I think the whole Avenues area has more of a tight community attitude than Sugarhouse. Within Sugarhouse there are bigger and smaller homes like SoBelle said, but Sugarhouse is more the same economically than the Avenues. I grew up in Sugarhouse and lived briefly in the lower Avenues when I first was on my own. I'd say Sugarhouse feels more like a 50s neighborhood and the Avenues is more eclectic/artsy. People tend to like the Avenues if they want to be close to downtown and the theater/symphony/shopping. People would gravitate to Sugarhouse for affordable postwar brick bungalows in nice neighborhoods. I'd personally feel safe walking at night in either the Avenues or Sugarhouse. Both areas are home to well educated hard working regular people.
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Old 02-13-2011, 12:08 PM
 
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That certainly helps. I want to ensure that we are in an area where my daughter can make friends easily (and us to). I would love to have it so the neighbor kids are always at our house or my daughter at theirs. Where there are block bbq's and get togethers within the neighborhood.
We don't really have that where we currently live. Everyone pretty much keeps to themselves.
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Old 02-13-2011, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,857 posts, read 61,776,236 times
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While my block does have a block party annually and we talk to each other a lot, there are few school-age children on my block. There's a college student, 2 high-school students, a few toddlers, and maybe a 1st grader. It varies by block. neither area is homogenous for age of residents, although in Sugar House it is mostly older folks and new couples.
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Old 02-15-2011, 12:18 PM
 
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Look into Holladay as a possibility. I really think that when the "Make it Appear That You're Ahead Of The Jones" crowd lost their homes, and the "Who The Hell Are the Jones?" crowd kept theirs, the whole plastic attitude cracked. Holladay has had a reputation for being over-represented in the Uppity Yuppie category, but when you look at who still lives in your neighborhood here in Holladay, it's the people who have block barbeques and live in older smaller homes. Holladay has an identity like the Avenues does, but it's architecturally more like Sugarhouse. It's in the stage of "turning over" with a lot of young families replacing the retirees. I think you might like it here. It's as far as you can get from homogeneous housing, so you'd have to do some searching to find the "just right" home, but they do exist, and there are some real deals that the exiting plastic people left behind.
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Old 02-15-2011, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
13,145 posts, read 21,053,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mahenley View Post
Hello, my family & I are moving to SLC here shortly & I've heard the best places to live are Sugarhouse or the Avenues. What I want to know are these places like a Scottsdale in Arizona where all the people are plastic or trying to keep up with the Jones & not really genuine people?

We currently live in Chandler & would like to find a place where it's not as important as to what you drive or how much money you make.

Thanks.
No, East bench Sandy and Draper are the Salt Lake equivilent of Scottsdale. Sugarhouse and the Avenues are old victorian and bungalow neighborhoods; they remind me more of places like Pasadena CA. There really is no Phoenix equivilent; Phoenix is too new.
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Old 02-15-2011, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
25,297 posts, read 25,901,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahRoots View Post
Look into Holladay as a possibility. I really think that when the "Make it Appear That You're Ahead Of The Jones" crowd lost their homes, and the "Who The Hell Are the Jones?" crowd kept theirs, the whole plastic attitude cracked. Holladay has had a reputation for being over-represented in the Uppity Yuppie category, but when you look at who still lives in your neighborhood here in Holladay, it's the people who have block barbeques and live in older smaller homes. Holladay has an identity like the Avenues does, but it's architecturally more like Sugarhouse. It's in the stage of "turning over" with a lot of young families replacing the retirees. I think you might like it here. It's as far as you can get from homogeneous housing, so you'd have to do some searching to find the "just right" home, but they do exist, and there are some real deals that the exiting plastic people left behind.
Obviously, you're in a better position to describe Holladay than I am, but wouldn't you agree that a great many homes in Holladay would cost at least a couple of hundred thousand dollars more than the average house in Sugarhouse?

Also, I agree that Holladay is "as far as you can get from homogeneous housing." To some people, that would be a plus. To me, it would probably be the sole drawback to living in Holladay. I don't like street after street of cookie cutter houses, but when I see a nearly new $500,000+ home sitting right in between a small frame cracker-box and a 1960's flat-roofed tract-style home, it just makes me cringe. Of course not all parts of Holladay are like that, and a few parts of many other neighborhoods are. Still, it's something to consider. Personally, I like variety in the houses' floorplans, etc. but a generally homogeneous look of the neighborhood. Both the lower Avenues and Sugarhouse would be more homogeneous than either Holladay or Cottonwood Heights.
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Old 02-15-2011, 11:42 PM
 
226 posts, read 530,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
Obviously, you're in a better position to describe Holladay than I am, but wouldn't you agree that a great many homes in Holladay would cost at least a couple of hundred thousand dollars more than the average house in Sugarhouse?

.
Not anymore. The 84105 (Sugarhouse) 2010 median sales price was $263K (up 2.3%)and the 84117 (Holladay) 2010 median price was $302K (down 15.8%) I really wasn't exaggerating about the number of homes on the market and the crash of prices. The only Sugarhouse neighborhood I think you could compare with Holladay for home values and similar feel would be the Harvard/Yale area, and the 2010 median price there was $263K (up 2%). And those lots are TEENY in comparison with most in Holladay. The 84103 zipcode (I think that's right around the U of U in the "M" street area) median sales price was $424K (up 17.8%) and those are nice houses but on quarter acre lots. So boy, if you're looking for big lots and nice houses, Holladay is it right now.

As far as the "far from homogeneous" nature of the houses – that's just a matter of personal taste. I like it. I like the architectural variety. Neighborhoods where all the houses alternate between three basic styles make me feel like I'm in Stepford. Now I'll grant you that the really oldest homes in Holladay are pioneer homes and they do look ridiculous sandwiched in between McMansions. But as they sell, they're torn down. The most recently built new homes are more in the Craftsman style and much smaller than the fake stucco McMansions that were built five years ago and are now sitting empty. There are homes in my neighborhood that have been sitting on the market for over a year and the asking prices have dropped $100K or more.
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